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ePub Cities of the Heartland: The Rise and Fall of the Industrial Midwest (Midwestern History and Culture) download

by Jon C. Teaford

ePub Cities of the Heartland: The Rise and Fall of the Industrial Midwest (Midwestern History and Culture) download
Author:
Jon C. Teaford
ISBN13:
978-0253209146
ISBN:
0253209145
Language:
Publisher:
Indiana University Press; New edition edition (April 22, 1993)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1120 kb
Fb2 file:
1486 kb
Other formats:
mobi doc lit rtf
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
438

Library Journal Teaford writes a definitive history of the transformation of America's heartland into the Rust Belt

Library Journal Teaford writes a definitive history of the transformation of America's heartland into the Rust Belt. This book doesn't read like a history book at all - in a good way. It really treats the cities like characters in themselves, discussing the cities' social, political and economic issues at the same time. It is, however, somewhat circular, so if you are looking for a singular analysis of american cities as a whole, you are out of luck. I'll say my city was addressed with the tenderness of a native, and so I am inclined to believe that each of the cities are more fairly portrayed than other histories. One person found this helpful.

Midwestern History and Culture.

Cities of the Heartland book. Jon C. Teaford is Professor Emeritus in the department of history at Purdue University. Books by Jon C. Teaford. In 1950 60% of all Southern born migrants in the Midwest were white, 40% black, almost the exact reversal of the Northeastern statistics, and this pattern continued to the 1970s. Furthermore, many polls, like one in Detroit in 1951, ranked poor white southerns as the most undesirable people in the city, far ahead of blacks in the vituperative response they elicited. Teaford

Jon C. Teaford is a professor of history at Purdue University.

Geographically, economically, and culturally, the midwestern city is "a legitimate subspecies of urban life. Creating the Urban Network.

The American Midwest: Rethinking the History of an American Nation (1990).

The American Midwest: Rethinking the History of an American Nation (1990). Good, David F. "American History through a Midwestern Lens. Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft 3. (2012): 435+ online; emphasis on economic history. Planting Corn Belt Culture: The Impress of the Upland Southerner and Yankee in the Old Northwest (1953). Van Tassell, David, and John J Grabowski, eds. The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History (2nd ed.

Recommend this journal.

Recommended for all who want to learn about the origins of the contemporary urban crisis

Recommended for all who want to learn about the origins of the contemporary urban crisis.

Recommended for all who want to learn about the origins of the contemporary urban crisis." ―Library Journal

Teaford writes a definitive history of the transformation of "America's heartland" into the "Rust Belt," chronicling the development of the cities of the industrial Midwest as they challenged the urban supremacy of the East, from their heyday to the trying times of the 1970s and '80s. The early part of this century brought wealth and promise to the heartland: automobile production made Detroit a boomtown, and automobile-related industries enriched communities; Frank Lloyd Wright and the Prairie School of architects asserted the Midwest's aesthetic independence; Sherwood Anderson and Carl Sandburg established Chicago as a literary mecca; Jane Addams made the Illinois metropolis an urban laboratory for experiments in social justice. Soon, however, emerging Sunbelt cities began to rob such cities as Cincinnati, Saint Louis, and Chicago of their distinction as boom areas, foreshadowing urban crisis.

  • This book doesn't read like a history book at all - in a good way. It really treats the cities like characters in themselves, discussing the cities' social, political and economic issues at the same time. It is, however, somewhat circular, so if you are looking for a singular analysis of american cities as a whole, you are out of luck. I'll say my city was addressed with the tenderness of a native, and so I am inclined to believe that each of the cities are more fairly portrayed than other histories.

  • This book had a lot of facts. And I would write more but I am on a time crunch, just wanted to note that it helped in my history class.