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ePub Foreign and Female: Immigrant Women in America download

by Doris Weatherford

ePub Foreign and Female: Immigrant Women in America download
Author:
Doris Weatherford
ISBN13:
978-0816034468
ISBN:
081603446X
Language:
Publisher:
Checkmark Books; Reprint edition (October 1, 1996)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1661 kb
Fb2 file:
1614 kb
Other formats:
lit lrf azw doc
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
383

Foreign And Female book.

Foreign And Female book. From 1840 to 1930 the United States received the greatest number. Drawing from the letters and diaries of immigrant women, the author records what life was like for female newcomers to America: how they lived, what they ate, how they worked, how they married, and much, much more.

Foreign and Female: Immigrant Women in America, 1840-1930, by Doris Weatherford. New York: Schocken Books, 1986. Making Americans: Immigration, Race, and the Origins of the Diverse Democracy, by Desmond King. Harvard University Press, 2000. Natives and Strangers: A Multicultural History of Americans, by Leonard Dinnerstein, Roger L. Nichols, David M. Reimers. New York : Oxford University Press, 1996.

Series: History of Women in America. She uses a great deal of personal diary entries in the book which general depict a woman's frustration with her role or world and then Weatherford puts herself in the woman's shoes

Series: History of Women in America. She uses a great deal of personal diary entries in the book which general depict a woman's frustration with her role or world and then Weatherford puts herself in the woman's shoes. For almost every "fact" that she delivers, she then adds her own take on the facts and the woman's position. Weatherford pretty soon becomes one of the diarist's angry entries page after page.

Discrimination and prejudice effected most immigrants, but Weatherford notes it was doubly felt by the woman as her status was even lower than the male

The author begins by making clear the difference between the European tradition of fatalistic acceptance and the prevailing American philosphy of individualism and self-determination. Discrimination and prejudice effected most immigrants, but Weatherford notes it was doubly felt by the woman as her status was even lower than the male.

DORIS WEATHERFORD is Adjunct Professor at the University of South Florida. reign and Female: Immigrant Women in America, 1840-1920. and ^IAmerican Women in World War II. Her book ^IA History of the American Suffragist Movement was selected as a 1998 Honor Book by the Society of School Librarians International. Her other books include ^IMilestones: A Chronology of American Women's History. erican Women's History: An A-Z of People, Organizations, Issues and Events.

Foreign Females In America. Aiming to be one of the biggest media for beautiful foreign females

Foreign Females In America. Aiming to be one of the biggest media for beautiful foreign females  . See actions taken by the people who manage and post content. Page created – 7 January 2017.

Liberty’s Daughters: The Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750-1800 by Mary Beth Norton (Cornell University Press)

Liberty’s Daughters: The Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750-1800 by Mary Beth Norton (Cornell University Press).

I resolved that when I finished my first book, Foreign and Female: Immigrant Women in America, 1840–1930, I. .

I resolved that when I finished my first book, Foreign and Female: Immigrant Women in America, 1840–1930, I would explore World War II. I learned some things, and in 1995, the Council on America’s Military Past invited me to speak at their annual convention. The several hundred people who attended were overwhelmingly male, and most were high-ranking officers who had added graduate degrees in history to their credentials. Frankly, I was nervous and feared they would accuse me of overstating the case for women.

Immigrant Women in the Land of Dollars: Life and Culture on the Lower East Side, 1890-1925. Foreign and Female: Immigrant Women in America, 1840-1930. From the Other Side: Women, Gender, and Immigrant Life in the . Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1994. New York: Facts on File, 1995.

Immigrant women from various ethnic groups share their feelings about their homelands, men, families, work, and other major facets of their lives
  • I bought "Foreign and Female" because I am an amateur genealogist, and I hoped to gain more insight to the lives of those 19th- and early 20th-century European female ancestors whose lives I am researching. I was not disappointed: For this purpose, I think, the book is rivaled only by Oscar Handlin's "The Uprooted", and it should be mandatory reading for any would-be American family historian.
    Beyond this, though, I highly recommend "Foreign and Female" to any American--man or women--who is interested in the history of our nation, warts and all. In recounting the hunger, hardships and heartaches of women who immigrated to America between 1840 and 1930, she also touches on the story of ALL American women, and their struggle for equal rights. Moreover, because these women often were the "tentpoles" of their families, we learn a lot about the lives of their children and male relatives--fathers, brothers, and husbands--as well.
    Finally, as a citizen of New York City, whose foreign-born population has surged once again to 10%(!), I valued the insight that this book gave me to the likely feelings of my immigrant neighbors and work colleagues, and their families. With the challenges that our city and country now face, understanding each other has become ever more important.
    I notice that reviews of Ms. Weatherford's other books often use the word "meticulous", and that adjective applies to this work as well. It is readily apparent that this author is very smart, and undaunted by original source material that others have bypassed. She does a remarkable job of weaving together the pertinent statistics that support her understanding of the life experience of "typical" female immigrants. But what made this book so compelling for me was her presentation of the voices of these women themselves, through their diaries and letters to the Old Country. Very well balanced, and very moving.
    My only criticism--and it is minor--is that the stories she tells seem to portray almost all men of this era as "cads". I do not doubt that the male chauvinism of the day was virtually universal, but do too many of her anecdotes show men as being coldly selfish, oppressive, and cruel?
    I have urged my wife, who is a school teacher, and my daughter, who is a college student, to find the time to read this book. I highly recommend it, too, to all other thoughtful Americans who want to understand better where our families and our nation really came from.

  • I really enjoyed this book. My ancestors were immigrant women and this book really explained the challenges they faced in coming to America during this period. It cleared up some questions I had about immigration generally. I felt it was well researched. It contained more statistical information than I was interested in, but overall a good book.

  • I picked this up at a museum bookstore quite a while ago. This is a facinating, unvarnished study of the American immigrant women's experience. As a member of gen-x, I was shocked at the birth mortality rates and the medical, cultural and religious bias' against women back in those days. Those of us who are descendants of these immigrant women owe them a huge debt of gratitude for their hardships, loss, perseverance and faith. If you, like me, picture your Great-Great-Great Grandmother perched on the bow of a ship heading toward Ellis Island and a glorious new world - read this book for the real story. This book should be required reading in American/Women's Studies courses in college. Note: there are alot of statistics in this book but they do a great job of supporting the author's interpretation of "herstory". Also, I particularly enjoyed the many excepts from actual letters written by women of the time - truly voices from the past.

  • I may have picked this book up on a remainder table. It sat for years on my bookshelf. Post 2012 election I began reading it. To be reminded of what women endured was timely. The first-hand accounts make it impossible to put down. My mother was born in 1914 in NY City. She was left at the Foundling Home when she was three months old, then went on the orphan trains. Before she died my sisters and I were able to piece together some of her story, but this book with its details about living and working conditions and disease, shed more light on what might have happened and why she may have been given up. As a writer, I will use it for research and plan to give it as a gift to female friends. My mother was an avid reader. Too bad she missed this one.

  • This book contains so many endearing accounts of women and their lives. I smile and cry reading these stories, thinking of my own ancestors and their similar stories! After reading this book, I feel so much closer to the women to whom I am so similar, and yet never met!