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by Gordon S. Wood

ePub The Idea of America: Reflections on the Birth of the United States download
Author:
Gordon S. Wood
ISBN13:
978-1594202902
ISBN:
1594202907
Language:
Publisher:
Penguin Press; First Edition edition (May 12, 2011)
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Subcategory:
Americas
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1593 kb
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1574 kb
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Rating:
4.1
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944

Gordon S. Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor Emeritus at Brown University. Wood explains via this book how so many of those interpretations are erroneous because of the way they have been constructed over time

Gordon S. His 1969 book, The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787, received the Bancroft and John H. Dunning prizes and was nominated for the National Book Award. His 1992 book, The Radicalism of the American Revolution, won the Pulitzer Prize and the Emerson Prize. Wood explains via this book how so many of those interpretations are erroneous because of the way they have been constructed over time. He explains how the people of the Revolution saw the event and struggled with its meaning because most of them differed in what they wanted the Revolution to be.

The Idea of America book. When it comes to the story of the early American republic, Gordon Woods probably writes this third type of history as well as anyone, alive or dead

The Idea of America book. When it comes to the story of the early American republic, Gordon Woods probably writes this third type of history as well as anyone, alive or dead. This book is a collection of some of Wood's short pieces of academic prose, presented over the course of his career as articles for scholarly journals or speeches in various academic forums, each updated for this collection, with notes after each chapter on Woods' current feelings on the issues he covers.

This is the summary of The Idea of America: Reflections on the .

This is the summary of The Idea of America: Reflections on the Birth of the United States by Gordon S. Wood. Relaxing Jazz Piano Radio - Slow Jazz Music - 24/7 Live Stream - Music For Work & Study Cafe Music BGM channel 1 351 зритель.

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Gordon S. Dunning prizes and was nominated for the National Book Award

Gordon S. His 2009 book, Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815, won the New-York Historical Society Prize in American History. In 2011 Wood was awarded a National Humanities Medal by President Obama

Also by gordon s. wood

Also by gordon s. The Creation of the American Republic, 1776–1787. winner of the Bancroft Prize). In addition to several books on the Revolution and its leaders, I have published a number of articles on the Revolutionary era, some of which are collected in this book. My preoccupation with the Revolution comes from my belief that it is the most important event in American history, bar none.

Reflections on the Birth of the United States. 385 pp. The Penguin Press. David Hackett Fischer teaches history at Brandeis University. He is the author of Champlain’s Dream and the forthcoming Fairness and Freedom: A History of Two Open Societies, New Zealand and the United States. Continue reading the main story.

Gordon Stewart Wood (born November 27, 1933) is an American historian and university . Reflections on the Birth of the United States. Penguin Press, New York City, 2011. ISBN 978-0143121244).

Gordon Stewart Wood (born November 27, 1933) is an American historian and university professor at Brown University. He is a recipient of the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for History for The Radicalism of the American Revolution (1992). He focused on the idea of equality as "the most radical and most powerful ideological force" that the American Revolution unleashed. This powerful sense of equality is still alive and well in America, and despite all of its disturbing and unsettling consequences, it is what makes us one people.

Mobile version (beta). The Idea of America: Reflections on the Birth of the United States. Download (epub, 403 Kb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format. Woo. as long been recognized as one of the preeminent historians of the era of the American Revolution. In this series of cogent, beautifully written essays, Wood repeats some of his familiar themes, but they are well worth revisiting.

The preeminent historian of the American Revolution explains why it remains the most significant event in our history. More than almost any other nation in the world, the United States began as an idea. For this reason, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Gordon S. Wood believes that the American Revolution is the most important event in our history, bar none. Since American identity is so fluid and not based on any universally shared heritage, we have had to continually return to our nation's founding to understand who we are. In The Idea of America, Wood reflects on the birth of American nationhood and explains why the revolution remains so essential. In a series of elegant and illuminating essays, Wood explores the ideological origins of the revolution-from ancient Rome to the European Enlightenment-and the founders' attempts to forge an American democracy. As Wood reveals, while the founders hoped to create a virtuous republic of yeoman farmers and uninterested leaders, they instead gave birth to a sprawling, licentious, and materialistic popular democracy. Wood also traces the origins of American exceptionalism to this period, revealing how the revolutionary generation, despite living in a distant, sparsely populated country, believed itself to be the most enlightened people on earth. The revolution gave Americans their messianic sense of purpose-and perhaps our continued propensity to promote democracy around the world-because the founders believed their colonial rebellion had universal significance for oppressed peoples everywhere. Yet what may seem like audacity in retrospect reflected the fact that in the eighteenth century republicanism was a truly radical ideology-as radical as Marxism would be in the nineteenth-and one that indeed inspired revolutionaries the world over. Today there exists what Wood calls a terrifying gap between us and the founders, such that it requires almost an act of imagination to fully recapture their era. Because we now take our democracy for granted, it is nearly impossible for us to appreciate how deeply the founders feared their grand experiment in liberty could evolve into monarchy or dissolve into licentiousness. Gracefully written and filled with insight, The Idea of America helps us to recapture the fears and hopes of the revolutionary generation and its attempts to translate those ideals into a working democracy.
  • Gordon Wood is one of America’s premier historians. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for The Radicalism of the American Revolution, Wood has been studying and writing about the Revolution for over fifty years. He is the Alva O. Way University Professor Emeritus at Brown University. Together with Bernard Bailyn and many of Bailyn’s graduate students at Harvard, he helped redefine our understanding of the Revolution.

    In this book, Wood has revisited many of his former speeches and essays on various subjects dealing with the Revolution. He explains how the concept of American Exceptionalism developed over time from its roots in the Revolution. He reiterates the understanding of the Revolution via radicalism which is so foreign to many today who consider the US to be a permanent fixture in the world and its history. As a community college professor I find it very difficult to get most students to understand the utter alien feeling we should have for this period of time. They’ve had it presented to them via polemic interpretations for years, and struggle when confronted by the raw facts about the Revolution because those facts conflict with their inherited beliefs.

    Wood explains via this book how so many of those interpretations are erroneous because of the way they have been constructed over time. He explains how the people of the Revolution saw the event and struggled with its meaning because most of them differed in what they wanted the Revolution to be. People today have difficulty with that idea, but they shouldn’t because if they would bother to look around them they would see a multitude of differing ideas about events today.

    The book is broken into three parts. The first is The American Revolution and deals with the views of the various people of the time. People at that time saw the world around them in a very different lens than the people today. They also saw history differently which is what Wood explains in the second chapter of this section, the Legacy of Rome in the American Revolution. This is followed by an essay on causality and deceit in that century. When used with the Five C’s of history, one can easily see how Wood is explaining the context behind the people of the period.

    The second part of the book is The Making of the Constitution and American Democracy. I particularly liked the last chapter in this section on the radicalism of Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Paine. So many today want to refer to Jefferson to give their opinions credibility, but they often have no idea that Jefferson was seen as a radical figure in his time period who polarized the nation with his views. Wood explains that Jefferson was able to get political power because he kept most of his radical ideas under wraps whereas Paine was quite open about his. As a result Paine alienated many people who felt his ideas, which were compatible to Jefferson’s, were too radical. I thought this was one of the best chapters of the book.

    The third and final section was about the Early Republic. Having read Empire of Liberty, a Pulitzer Prize finalist book written by Wood a few years earlier, I was not surprised by these chapters at all. Wood didn’t disappoint me with his interpretation since I already had an idea of what he was going to say. The last chapter of this section dealt with the history of rights in the early American Republic stage of our nation. The meaning of the word and the definition of rights has changed over the years. That is pretty normal as historians see things, but most people struggle to understand that. Many today take rights for granted, but Wood explains how the people of the Revolution felt about rights and how they felt those rights were not to be taken for granted. We today see a list of rights. The people of the past saw their rights under attack and demanded that they be written down to avoid future challenges to them. Unfortunately for them, they failed to understand that the meaning of those rights would change over time as the world changed over time. Fortunately for everyone, the people of the past put together a very flexible system of government that was able to adapt to those changes while preserving those rights of the people.

    I was really interested in reading this book. Reading a book by Gordon Wood is not something to be done lightly. It takes a bit of time to digest what he says because it is profound. While he works with facts like any historian does, Wood has one of the greatest contextual understandings of the motives and feelings that the people of the 18th century had. His writing often requires some deep reflection because he challenges assumptions. He really explores the true radicalism of the Revolution and quite frankly, many of our political beliefs that have developed over the years. In many ways, Wood is one of the best historians for proving the saying that, “the past is a foreign country.”

    With that said, I obviously enjoyed reading this book and recommend it to anyone interested in the Revolution. I stress the need to read it in bites as I have never read anything by Wood that speed reading works with. The style of writing is great. It is the depth of understanding behind that style that goes far deeper than most historical monographs which must be realized when reading this book. I have yet to put down one of his books where I have not been going to primary sources to see just what Wood read so I can understand what he is saying. That is the hallmark of a great historian and Gordon S. Wood is one.

  • First of all I must say that, quite simply put, Pulitzer prize winner Dr Gordon Wood has crafted yet another masterpiece. "The Idea of America " is a phenomenal selection of essays regarding the American Revolution and Early Republic with a smorgasbord of topics ranging from trends in historiography, Conspiracy in pre Revolutionary thought, the depth of Thomas Jefferson's republican radicalism, and fears in the early republic of a connection between federalism and a reestablishment of monarchy.

    This work is a series of essays written by Woods over the course of his impressive career in colonial/early Republic writing spanning nearly six decades! Although primarily a work of analysis, this work is an absolute page turner after the initial chapter on historiography. Never before have a found a work of analysis to be so absolutely satisfying of a read. The above-mentioned first chapter is primarily a discussion of the development of revolutionary history writing from the Progressive movement to the later Neo Whig/idealistic interpretations to Woods' own synthesis of both styles. He argues quite convincingly that although ideas cannot by themselves lead to actions they play a significant role in forming of the motives that did lead to action.

    Most fascinating for myself was the chapter on `Conspiracy and the Paranoid Style...'. So engrossing was his description and analysis of the origins of conspiracy theories in pre Revolutionary 18th century America and Europe that I completely forgot my normal note taking for pages at a time. His argument is that rather than widespread conspiracy theories and a "paranoid style" being somehow unique to Americans as Richard Hofstadter wrote decades ago, they were themselves a logical outgrowth of the enlightenment belief in natural law. In compelling fashion Woods analyzes this phenomenon. Indeed, I found myself through this chapter now searching for further, more thorough development of the topic.

    Also gripping in its own right is the chapter on `Disinterestedness' in politics of the early Republic. This is particularly interesting to those biography nuts out there as it gets right to the heart of the issue of the profiles of honorably disinterested public figures and what this actually meant for the revolutionary generation. As hard as it is to believe in time when nearly all public `servants' are up to their necks in some corruption scandal or another, Woods does justice in describing a time when there actually were some (John Adams and George Washington for example) who believed in doing the right things for the nation and the citizens living within its borders.

    Really one could go on and on about the phenomenal scholarship and analysis contained within this collection of essays, as well as Dr. Woods gripping writing style. All in all this is a book which should be included in any college survey of the pre-revolution/early republic period. `The Idea of America' is a six star book that I can unfortunately only rate with five.