mostraligabue
» » The Worst Team Money Could Buy

ePub The Worst Team Money Could Buy download

by John Harper,Bob Klapisch

ePub The Worst Team Money Could Buy download
Author:
John Harper,Bob Klapisch
ISBN13:
978-0803278226
ISBN:
0803278225
Language:
Publisher:
Bison Books (March 1, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1564 kb
Fb2 file:
1472 kb
Other formats:
rtf txt mobi docx
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
630

Ships from and sold by Manor26. Coming into the 1992 season, the Mets spent a lot of money to bring in Bret Saberhagen (worked out well), Bobby Bonilla (one of the all-time great NY free-agent disasters) and Eddie Murray (a Hall of Fame 1b at the end of his career who hated the press). Compounding the problem was Vince Coleman, whom the Cardinals were happy to let walk before the '91 season.

This book mainly chronicles the 1992 season, yet slowly sutures the teams fall from their championship season six short years ago.

The partying, women, egos, and many other on and off field distruptions put the mets in the cellar. The authors do a good job digging into the dirt and details of the many overpaid and under productive players who made up this abortion of a team.

He is the author of five baseball books, including High and Tight: The Rise and Fall of Dwight Gooden and Darryl Strawberry.

Books with the subject: New York Mets (baseball Team). Bad Guys Won - Jeff Pearlman. New york mets (baseball team), world series (baseball). New york mets (baseball team). Can't Anybody Here Play This Game?: The Improbable Saga of the New York Met's First Year - Jimmy Breslin. New york mets (baseball team), baseball fans, new york (state)-new york.

BBWAA - Badge List Archived July 13, 2007, at the Wayback Machine, The Biz of Baseball, posted December 10, 2007

304 pp. New York: Random House.

Paperback John Steinbeck Books. Biographies & True Stories Harper Lee Paperback Books. Paperback Harper Lee Books. Classics Paperback Fiction Books Harper Lee. Paperback Fiction Books in English Harper Lee. Harper Lee Paperback Children's & Young Adults' Books. Additional site navigation.

July 31, 2010 History. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Published 2005 by University of Nebraska Press in Lincoln. History, New York Mets (Baseball team).

newspaper, the

Even before the New York Mets began the 1992 season, they had set a critical record: the highest payroll ever for a major-league team, $45 million. With players Bobby Bonilla, Vince Coleman, Bret Saberhagen, and Howard Johnson, winning another championship seemed a mere formality. The 1992 New York Mets never made it to Cooperstown, however. Veteran newspapermen Bob Klapisch and John Harper reveal the extraordinary inside story of the Mets’ decline and fall—with the sort of detail and uncensored quotes that never run in a family newspaper. From the sex scandals that plagued the club in Florida to the puritanical, no-booze rules of manager Jeff Torborg, from bad behavior on road trips to the downright ornery practical “jokes” that big boys play, The Worst Team Money Could Buy is a grand-slam classic.
  • 3.5 stars

    This 287 page book reads very quickly. It was co-written by two of the daily reporters that covered the Mets during their disastrous 1992 season (there were seven regular beat writers at that time). Both of them had covered the team for years, so there were stories from the '86 championship and the '88 disappointment. Despite having left for the Dodgers after the '90 season, Strawberry looms large in the book.

    Coming into the 1992 season, the Mets spent a lot of money to bring in Bret Saberhagen (worked out well), Bobby Bonilla (one of the all-time great NY free-agent disasters) and Eddie Murray (a Hall of Fame 1b at the end of his career who hated the press). Compounding the problem was Vince Coleman, whom the Cardinals were happy to let walk before the '91 season. The Mets were plagued by injuries, scandals, lying, and Jeff Torborg's poor leadership.

    2017 Met fans will see a long history of poor leadership from the Wilpons and injury problems that range back before 1992. It's a tough history to read in that sense.

    It's fun, but no stories really stick out like the books on the '78 Yankees (Kahn's book is better than Lyle's) or '97 Marlins. That said, it reads quickly and has lots of insider information. If you are a NY fan (either team) or a baseball nut, you'll really like it.

  • While this book covered the era of the early 1990s and the destruction of what it took to win the 1986 World Series and the 1988 National League East championship, every single man who contributed to the heart and soul of those teams were gone, by either trade or otherwise (Ray Knight, Lenny Dykstra, etc). And what is glaringly obvious is that Mets management were surrounded by a bunch of front office guys who knew little about baseball, the ability to recognize talent, and through free-agent signings and player development weren't able to put a respectable, winning team on the field. The saddest statement of all is here we are in 2013, and in 20+ years' time the Wilpons still haven't managed to surround themselves with knowledgeable people who have any sense of the game or the guys who play it. Their refusal to sell the team is to the detriment of their fans. What I've come to believe is that as long as the Wilpons are the owners of the New York Mets, they will never win another championship. And to have a brand new ball park with the seats half full, game after game, is a pitiful sight to behold.

  • Another book portraying Gregg Jefferies as a prima donna. Jefferies was such a pain in the butt that he'd have his bats shipped separately from the other players bats. Roger McDowell got even with him by sawing all his bats in half and then tapping them together. Jefferies had no idea until one day he went to grab an extra bat during a game and the bat broke in his hands. It's interesting to read about the players from my time period 1988-93. Those were my peak years of viewing MLB baseball. My favorite quote of the book was from David Cone in reaction to alcohol being banned from Mets' charter flights. "You have a rule that makes us look like screw-ups...You haven't given us a chance to prove we can handle alcohol like adults. Right off the bat you put us in a negative light."

    I guess Steve Carlton made enemies as well with the press. He would routinely say "No comment" when asked about a game he pitched in. However when he was at the tail end of his career, he fell back into the good relations with the press in an effort to prolong his career.

  • I was able to see this group play in person. Everyone was hyped for the super team. The book grasped era and the times. There doesn't seem to many books about teams from the 87 to 95 seasons. For young writers it is a good first person account of journalism pre Internet.

  • This read is terrific at giving an insider's account of a baseball season. Klapisch and Harper show not only what it is like to work as sports writers but also what it is like to cover a huge franchise in a big city where the media coverage is mighty. The stories about the 1992 Mets are interesting and many of the issues (money, teamwork, injuries, poor management) probably resonate to sports teams even today. This is one of the better sports books around.

  • Beat writers are actually among the best sources for what really happens in the closed-door fraternity of professional sports. Klapisch and Harper don't spare any feelings in describing the dysfunction of the early '90s Mets; lots of raw truth. -Brad Balukjian

  • great book at a great price

  • WORST TEAM MONEY CAN BUY IS ABOUT THE 1992 METS WHO HAD THE HIGHEST PAYROLL IN BASEBALL BUT WERE A HUGE FLOP. THE PARTYING, WOMEN, EGOS, AND MANY OTHER ON AND OFF FIELD DISTRUPTIONS PUT THE METS IN THE CELLAR. THE AUTHORS DO A GOOD JOB DIGGING INTO THE DIRT AND DETAILS OF THE MANY OVERPAID AND UNDER PRODUCTIVE PLAYERS WHO MADE UP THIS ABORTION OF A TEAM. FROM MANAGER JEFF(THE CHRISTIAN) TORBORG, BOBBY BO, DAVID CONE(HEAD) AND ALL THE REST OF THE CHARACTERS IT'S ALL THERE. I THINK THIS IS MOSTLY FOR TRUE DIE HARD MET AND BASEBALL FANS.