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ePub The Limits of Dissent: Clement L. Vallandigham and the Civil War (The North's Civil War) download

by Frank L. Klement

ePub The Limits of Dissent: Clement L. Vallandigham and the Civil War (The North's Civil War) download
Author:
Frank L. Klement
ISBN13:
978-0823218905
ISBN:
0823218902
Language:
Publisher:
Fordham University Press (January 1, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1989 kb
Fb2 file:
1543 kb
Other formats:
azw doc mbr lrf
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
311

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The limits of dissent: Clement L. Vallandigham & the Civil War. Frank L. Klement. Download (epub, . 1 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Vallandigham was the foremost northern opponent of Lincoln and the prosecution of the Civil War; serving three terms in congress and running an unsuccessful campaign for governor of Ohio while in political exile during 1863

Vallandigham was the foremost northern opponent of Lincoln and the prosecution of the Civil War; serving three terms in congress and running an unsuccessful campaign for governor of Ohio while in political exile during 1863. Klement clearly admired Valladigham as a proponent of fundament liberties, including the freedom to dissent during wartime. The subject does emerge in a sympathetic light, although he was clearly bigoted and self-righteous. The author does not deny these traits in his subject.

Frank L. Klement once jokingly told an audience that there were only two important central figures in the Civil Wa. Klement once jokingly told an audience that there were only two important central figures in the Civil War. Abraham Lincoln was number one. Clement L. Vallandigham, Lincoln’s most notable critic, was number two- mainly because I did a book about him, Klement chuckled. Although he could occasionally intersperse a bit of humor into his lectures about the Copperheads, Klement saw it as no laughing matter the way Vallandigham and other outspoken northern critics of the Lincoln administration were treated by the Northern government during the conflict, and by historians afterward.

Every American war has brought conflict over the extent to which national security will permit protesters to exercise their .

Every American war has brought conflict over the extent to which national security will permit protesters to exercise their constitutional guarantee of freedom of expression. The most famous case was that of Clement L. Vallandigham, the passionate critic of Lincoln's Civil War policies and one of the most controversial figure in the nation's history. In the great crisis of his time, he insisted that no circumstance, even war, could deprive a citizen of his right to oppose government policy freely and openly

The Limits of Dissent book. Klement reassesses Clement L. Vallandigham, the passionate critic of Lincoln's policies, and history's judgment of him. Get A Copy.

The Limits of Dissent book.

No figure of the Civil War era was more controversial than Clement L. Vallandigham. Although Clement L. Vallandigham and Stephen A. Douglas held similar views on most issues, they were slow to become allies. Both had supported Lewis Cass, the Democratic candidate for president in the election of 1848, and both seemed disposed to accept the Cass doctrine -that residents in a territory have the right to choose their own domestic institutions -as a means to lessen debate over slavery in Congress. In the great crisis of his time, he insisted that no circumstance, even war, could deprive a citizen of his right to oppose government policy freely and openly. The consequence was a furor which shook the nation's legislative halls.

Beals, War Within a War, 3, 4; James Alex Baggett, The Scalawags: Southern Dissenters in the Civil War and Reconstruction . Frank Klement, The Limits of Dissent: Clement L. Vallandigham and the Civil War (New York: Fordham University Press, 1998), 11. oogle Scholar.

Beals, War Within a War, 3, 4; James Alex Baggett, The Scalawags: Southern Dissenters in the Civil War and Reconstruction (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2003), 4. 6. Georgia Lee Tatum, Disloyalty in the Confederacy (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1934), 5, 14. 34. David Herbert Donald, Lincoln (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995), 530–32.

The Limits of Dissent Clement L. Vallandigham and the Civil War by Frank L. Klement and Publisher The University Press of Kentucky. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780813163741, 0813163749. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780813153551, 0813153557.

Frank L. Klement reassesses Clement L. Vallandigham, the passionate critic of Lincoln's policies, and history's judgment of him.
  • Definitive biography
    Jennifer Weber's recent popular work on the Copperhead movement has challenged many of Frank Klement's contentions that Peace Democrats were harmless, if racist, dissenters who were primarily concerned with constitutional liberties and Abraham Lincoln's expansion of federal powers. Vallandigham was the foremost northern opponent of Lincoln and the prosecution of the Civil War; serving three terms in congress and running an unsuccessful campaign for governor of Ohio while in political exile during 1863.
    Klement clearly admired Valladigham as a proponent of fundament liberties, including the freedom to dissent during wartime. The subject does emerge in a sympathetic light, although he was clearly bigoted and self-righteous. The author does not deny these traits in his subject. Although I do not share Klement's contentions that copperheads were harmless, his biography of Vallandigham does not appear to be in need of revision. Klement's does a fine job of tracing the important moments of Vallidigham's life in spite of a lack of primary material from the subject. It is doubtful that a more critical examination of Vallandigham would surpass Klement's work in value.

  • Frank Klement's bio of the most controversial and yet largely forgotten figure of the Civil War era is one that all scholars should read. It is also interesting enough to tickle a general history reader's fancy. The one flaw is that Klement likes his main character a bit too much. Clement L. Vallandigham was an obnoxious, negrophobic, Republican-hating gadfly (the title of one of the chapters) whose stick-it-in-your-eye attitude both in and out of Congress made him unappealing even within his Democratic party. Klement regularly refers to Vallandigham's severest critics as "bigots" (largely true), but never does he label Vallandigham with that title, even though he deserved it. Klement's explanation as to why Vallandigham lost the Ohio governor's race in 1863 is lopsided, just bad luck after the victories at Gettysburg and Vicksburg and the repelling of John Hunt Morgan's raid into Ohio. Klement seems unable to admit that many people passionately hated Vallandigham, not the least of whom were the soldiers fighting in the field for the cause against which he spoke so vehemently. (Sound familiar here in 2006?) Nonetheless, Clement Vallandigham was a force during his time and became an icon to civil rights after Ambrose Burnside ordered his arrest and trial and Lincoln banished him to the South. He never accepted the fact that war might require a different approach to civil liberties. (Speaking of Burnside, there is an extraordinary error on page 122. Klement refers to Burnside's defeat Dec. 13, 1862, at the battle of Chancellorsville and repeats it further down the page. That battle, of course, was Fredericksburg. Chancellorsville occurred the following May. Forgive Klement. That kind of error is easy to make even when you know better, as he surely did. But where was the editor?)

  • Critics of this brave man only have to answer the question, "Where in the Constitution of the United States does it permit a President to be a dictator who can decide unilaterally to completely ignore all of the restrictions placed on the power of the Federal Government? Lincoln invaded the South and caused over 1 million casualties, destroyed printing presses in the North, imprisoned politicians that disagreed with him who were from the North, completely threw out the principle of
    "Habeas Corpus" and a right to a trial of your peers and on and on. Lincoln created the Federal Monster in DC that has waged almost constant war since the Korean War of the early 1950's without a declaration of war that only Congress can give. This is the same DC monster that has bankrupted Americans with out of control spending and no accountability for massive waste, abuse and corruption. Finally, the various alphabet soup of "Intelligence" agencies collect every bit of citizen's private communications in emails, texts, phone calls etc. Every bit of this is in complete violation of the law of the land found in the US Constitution and Lincoln was the architect of our current dictatorship in Washington DC. Clement L. Vallandigham was just one of many who were persecuted by Lincoln because they exposed "Saint Abe" as the Emperor without any clothes.