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ePub From Appomattox to Montmartre: Americans and the Paris Commune (Harvard Historical Studies) download

by Philip M. Katz

ePub From Appomattox to Montmartre: Americans and the Paris Commune (Harvard Historical Studies) download
Author:
Philip M. Katz
ISBN13:
978-0674323483
ISBN:
0674323483
Language:
Publisher:
Harvard University Press; 206th ed. edition (December 1, 1998)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1833 kb
Fb2 file:
1128 kb
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Rating:
4.5
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944

Harvard Historical Studies 131. From Appomattox to Montmartre. Americans and the Paris Commune. Katz shows how American political culture in the period that followed the Paris Commune was shaped by that event

Harvard Historical Studies 131. Katz shows how American political culture in the period that followed the Paris Commune was shaped by that event. The telegraph, the new Atlantic cable, and the news-gathering experience gained in the Civil War transformed the Paris Commune into an American national event. News from Europe arrived in fragments, however, and was rarely cohesive and often contradictory. Americans were forced to assimilate the foreign events into familiar domestic patterns, most notably the Civil War.

From Appomattox to Montmartre book. The American Civil War and the Paris Commune of 1871, Philip Katz argues, were part of the broader sweep of transatlantic development in the mid-nineteenth century - an age of democratic civil wars.

Marxism: An Historical and Critical Study is a 1961 book by George Lichtheim, in which the author provides a study of the development of Marxism from its origins to 1917. It has been seen as a classic discussion of the subject, though it has received some criticism. The historian Peter Gay described Marxism: An Historical and Critical Study as one of the best discussions of alienation in the literature on Marx and Hegel.

Book Overview Katz shows how American political culture in the period that followed the Paris Commune was shaped by that event.

The American Civil War and the Paris Commune of 1871, Philip Katz argues, were part of the broader sweep of transatlantic development in the mid-nineteenth century-an age of democratic civil wars.

The American Civil War and the Paris Commune of 1871, Philip Katz argues, were part of the broader .

Harvard University Press, 1998. Mistakes and Myths: The Allies, Germany, and the Versailles Treaty, 1918–1921. Defenestration as Ritual Punishment: Windows, Power, and Political Culture in Early Modern Europe. Sociology and Colonialism in the British and French Empires, 1945–1965. An Identity of Opinion: Historians and July 1914.

Similar books and articles. Gay L. GULLICKSON, Unruly Women of Paris : Images of the Paris Commune, Ithaca, NY, Cornell University Press, 1996.

The European Legacy 8 (4):522-522 (2003). Similar books and articles. The People's Communes and the Paris Commune. Joseph Liu - 1972 - Studies in East European Thought 12 (2):149-165. Denise Z. Davidson - 1998 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 1:24-24. Samuel Bernstein - 1941 - Science and Society 5 (2):117 - 147. La Commune de Paris, Fête populaire. Henri Lefebvre - 1972 - Dialogue 11 (3):360-375.

From Appomattox to Montmartre: Americans and the Paris Commune

From Appomattox to Montmartre: Americans and the Paris Commune. The American Civil War and the Paris Commune of 1871, Philip Katz argues, were part of the broader sweep of transatlantic development in the mid-nineteenth century-an age of democratic civil wars.

Excellent historical studies are provided in The Siege of Paris, 1870–1871: A Political and Social History (1971) by Melvin Kranzberg; and From Appomattox to Montmartre by Philip Katz (1998). 267 I shall deem it my duty: Elihu Washburne to Secretary of State Hamilton Fish, July 19, 1870, Washburne, Franco-German War and the Insurrection of the Commune, Correspondence of E. B. Washburne, 1. 267 There are no carriages: Elihu Washburne Diary, September 19, 1870, Library of Congress. 267 Has the world ever witnessed : Ibid.

The American Civil War and the Paris Commune of 1871, Philip Katz argues, were part of the broader sweep of transatlantic development in the mid-nineteenth century--an age of democratic civil wars. Katz shows how American political culture in the period that followed the Paris Commune was shaped by that event.

The telegraph, the new Atlantic cable, and the news-gathering experience gained in the Civil War transformed the Paris Commune into an American national event. News from Europe arrived in fragments, however, and was rarely cohesive and often contradictory. Americans were forced to assimilate the foreign events into familiar domestic patterns, most notably the Civil War. Two ways of Americanizing the Commune emerged: descriptive (recasting events in American terms in order to better understand them) and predictive (preoccupation with whether Parisian unrest might reproduce itself in the United States).

By 1877, the Commune became a symbol for the domestic labor unrest that culminated in the Great Railroad Strike of that year. As more powerful local models of social unrest emerged, however, the Commune slowly disappeared as an active force in American culture.