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by Richard B. Drake

ePub A History of Appalachia download
Author:
Richard B. Drake
ISBN13:
978-0813190600
ISBN:
0813190606
Language:
Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky; Reprint edition (September 1, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1339 kb
Fb2 file:
1650 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
882

Richard Drake is convincing that there are enough distinctions in history, society and culture to Appalachia for .

Richard Drake is convincing that there are enough distinctions in history, society and culture to Appalachia for it to be a distinct region. Perhaps less convincing is his discussion of the "Yeoman" culture. The scope of the book is broad starting with the Indian Era through the Civil War, to the "new Appalachia" of 1930-2000, and into the future. The biggest flaw in Drake's otherwise admirable book is his rejection of what might be called the Fischer premise (stated in his "Albion's Seed"), that Appalachia was (and is) more violent than the American general level. Drake says the stereotypical version of the feudin', fightin', cousin-marryin' highlander is exaggerated.

Электронная книга "A History of Appalachia", Richard B. Drake. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "A History of Appalachia" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

A History of Appalachia book. Richard Drake has skillfully woven together the various strands of the Appalachian experience into a sweeping whole. Touching upon folk traditions, health care, the environment, higher education, the role of blacks and women, and much more, Drake offers a compelling social history of a unique American region. The Appalachian region, extending from Alabama in the South up to Richard Drake has skillfully woven together the various strands of the Appalachian experience into a sweeping whole.

Richard Drake has skillfully woven together the various strands of the Appalachian experience into a sweeping whole. A History of Appalachia also examines pockets of urbanization in Appalachia. Chemical, textile, and other industries have encouraged the development of urban areas.

A history of Appalachia. by. Drake, Richard . 1925-. Lexington : University Press of Kentucky. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; americana. A social history of Appalachia, touching upon folk traditions, health care, the environment, higher education, and the role of Blacks and women. The author looks at t.

A splendid synthesis by Kentuckian Drake (History/Berea Coll. who has devoted his career to the study of Appalachia. In the author’s definition, Appalachia comprises territory from New York to Alabama. He begins this swift, sweeping study not with the geological story (a questionable omission), but with the history of the earliest humans-Indians who lived in what is now northern Alabama about 8,000 years ago. (Earlier Indian groups had hunted in the region but did not remain. Drake then considers the Europeans immigrants and identifies among them a mentality that remains today-what he calls a yeomanesque aspiration for land.

Geographic Name: Appalachian Region History. Download now A history of Appalachia Richard B. Download DOC book format. Download PDF book format. book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

For more than 20 years historians have expressed the critical need for a single-volume history of Appalachia in Virginia. Responding to this demand, the author of this text has woven together the various strands of the Appalachian experience into a sweeping whole.

Richard Drake has skillfully woven together the various strands of the Appalachian experience into a sweeping. University Press of Kentucky. Richard Drake has skillfully woven together the various strands of the Appalachian experience into a sweeping. ISBN10 : 9780813137933, ISBN13 : 0813137934.

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  • The book presents definitions of the Appalachian region that range from those of the Appalachian Regional Commission (Mississippi to New York State) to more restrained definitions but it concentrates on the Appalachian South, which makes for interesting reading. The chapters cover topics ranging from differences in land settlement that arose from different land laws, to literature from or about Appalachia, to abolitionism and postbellum politics. The author covers the changes brought by mining the significant mineral wealth and challenges that remain. This book is good introduction to many aspects of Appalachia.

  • Not quite what I was looking for; reads like s text book.

  • Good resource

  • Richard Drake is convincing that there are enough distinctions in history, society and culture to Appalachia for it to be a distinct region. Perhaps less convincing is his discussion of the "Yeoman" culture. The scope of the book is broad starting with the Indian Era through the Civil War, to the "new Appalachia" of 1930-2000, and into the future. All though he states the region is diverse, I would have appreciated more discussion about differences within the region: I suspect that SE Kentucky is very different than Northern Pennsylvania.

    The book tends to be dry and only when I focused more on my own state (Kentucky) did it seem more coherent. The inclusion of 16 pages of black and white photographs, also help give a more complete picture.

  • wesome book that everyone should read and enjoy from kids to adults it is full of great history and fully real

  • A part of America that most Americans really don't understand, or care about, or know about. Some parts of Appalachia are like a Third World country..

  • From Lookout Mountain, Tennessee, on a clear day you can see most of Appalachia: See Seven States is the slogan. From my grandmother's porch on "The Brow" nearby on Signal Mountain, you could see six states.

    But is Appalachia even a place? It is surely an ecological province, and a very interesting one. For its size, it has more tree species than any other part of the temperate zone, for example. But is it a specific historical zone?

    Richard Drake, who was a historian at Berea College, takes this question seriously. Some other scholars have averred that Appalachia was an invention of outsiders. As an Appalachian myself, I never had any doubts that we were different from other folks, and Drake concludes the same.

    Geographically, Appalachia extends nearly to Canada, but in human terms it divides fairly cleanly into northern and southern sections, and it is the southern part that is usually thought of when the word is used. For most purposes, Drake takes Appalachia to run south from Pittsburgh.

    The original residents of Appalachia do not seem to have formed a distinctive zone. Indian cultures, so far as we know them, were not coterminous with the several hundred counties in 10 states that make up Drake's Appalachia. The reason, not identified by Drake, is simple. Uncomplicated Indian material culture was not constrained by rugged mountains. One could hunt, fish and grow a little corn and pumpkins as easily in the mountains as in the bottoms. (Hawaii, where I live now, shows a similar situation. Places, such as valleys on the north shore of Molokai, that today are so remote that people scarcely visit them, were populated in premodern times, because they were nearly self-sufficient.)

    It was the irupution of iron, gunpowder and woven cloth into the southeast that allowed the evolution of a distinctive Appalachian cultural zone. Mountain people were necessarily going to be poorer than residents of the Piedmont. Drake distinguishes three kinds of Appalachians: the educated, politically dominant county seat townsfolk, the prosperous farmers in the bottoms and the ones he cares most about, who have been called Branchwater Mountaineers: Largely unschooled, with unproductive farms and, until radio came, spotty contact with the rest of the world.

    Drake defines these backwoodsmen as inheritors of a "yeomanesque" outlook, derived from their ancestors in (mostly) Britain and Germany (although he frequently reminds his readers that Africa was the origin about about 10 percent of Appalachia's non-native population), who yearned for their own land and a chance to live on their own. They had little hankering for money income and so no inclination to commercial agriculture.

    As often happens when people are in no position to become wealthy, they developed a system, of esteem and respect that was not based on money. That alone made Appalachians outsiders in the American culture.

    By an historical accident, the people who settled Appalachia were largely from what David Hackett Fischer calls the British Borderlands of northern England, lowland Scotland and northern Ireland, an area without effective central government but with a culture of honor, blood feuds, primitive agricultural methods and violence. Drake specifically says these "Scotch-Irish" were good farmers, but he is wrong and Fischer is right. The Germans, largely from the Palatinate, were good farmers, but the English-speakers were, and are, not.

    The biggest flaw in Drake's otherwise admirable book is his rejection of what might be called the Fischer premise (stated in his "Albion's Seed"), that Appalachia was (and is) more violent than the American general level. Drake says the stereotypical version of the feudin', fightin', cousin-marryin' highlander is exaggerated.

    Not by much. As a Kentucky writer, he has to address the Hatfield-McCoy legend and some other aspects of Southern mountain violence (like the Saltville massacre), but he downplays its pervasiveness.

    In order to do this, he has to overlook some serious kinds of organized and unorganized violence. The Night Riders of Kentucky in 1907-08, the Siege of Athens (Tennessee) and the Homestead strike, for example, which he doesn't mention.

    On the other hand, he is right to emphasize the almost crazed land hunger that marks the southern highlander. The fierceness with which the typical Appalachian defends his property line, especially from the occasional agent of public law, is no stereotype.

    Drake is also under the influence of Immanuel Wallerstein and World System Theory and tends to favor some recent scholarship that treats Appalachia as an internal colony for resource extraction in the larger country. This is defensible but unpersuasive. Drake, judicious throughout, sympathizes with the economic plight of the Branchwater Mountaineer but draws back from the forthright anger of a Harry Caudill ("Night Comes to the Cumberlands").

    I find Caudill more persuasive.

    "A History of Appalachia" reads as if it were written as a text for an introductory level college course, and in a few pages tries to be comprehensive. I think he underdoes mountain religion and music and overdoes the printed part of mountain culture.

    Southern Appalachia is a strange and beautiful place, populated by a strange and prideful people, too exuberant, idiosyncratic and standoffish to be limned in a volume of fewer than 300 pages. But as a thoughtful introduction, "A History of Appalachia" covers, or at least touches upon, all the bases.

  • A HISTORY OF APPALACHIA is a well-written, history of Appalachia. The introduction notes that "....there are those who reserve as Appalachia only those areas of the Southern Appalachians that are `real mountains." The author's definition is broader including "all of the provinces of the Southern Appalachian" and extends to western Pennsylvania.
    The book is organized in three parts. Part 1, titled THE CONTEST FOR APPALACHIA, covers the period from the Indians through the American Revolution. The author writes "The principal class who migrated to America after 1715 were mostly folk who shared a....desire for land to support their basically simple lives." These migrants passed through the coastal area and settled in the backwoods where small acreages were cleared and became basically a predominately yeoman (farm) economy.
    Part 2, THE NEW NATION AND THE APPALACHIAN BACKWOODS, covers the period through the Civil War. While Appalachia supported the Revolution, they had no representation at the constitutional debates of 1787-1789. "By 1800 quite a different European-derived society had developed along the Appalachian frontier" and the author notes that a "snug little rivalry" developed between the east and west sections of the eastern states. Appalachia supported the War of 1812 when loyalty soared in the Appalachian backwoods but divisive issues would soon appear.
    The text notes "most small farmers in East Tennessee, northern Georgia, West Virginia and eastern Kentucky usually identified more strongly with the....Union." These areas were often identified with the Radical Republican during Reconstruction.; however, by 1876 the ex-Confederates had again assumed control. The text briefly discusses the feuds of the era noting many were active "before the Civil War."
    The author notes that after the Civil War in the remoteness of mountain regions far from adequate transportation ", a remarkable similar way of life developed in Appalachia's most isolated sections" which resulted in increased isolation reinforcing a stereotype about a `strange and peculiar people."
    MODERN APPALACHIA, Part 3, narrates the period from Post-Reconstruction to the year 2000 covering the Industrial Revolution, the Depression, the War on Poverty, and finally the dawning of the Information Age. As the text notes "Appalachia has always been a complex area." From "1865 to 1920, Appalachia was discovered" and defined "by literate America who were northern writers. The picture that emerged was often grossly inaccurate, based on stereotype and self-serving characteristics." For example, "....the word hillbilly did not appear until 1900 when a New York Journal reporter defined such people as `free and untrammelled white' citizens living in the hills' with `no means to speak of, `who dresses as he can,'drinks whiskey, and fires off his revolver as fancy takes him."
    During the machine age the mineral exploitation of the area took place and in many areas of the Great Valley significant industrial developments followed the railroads with an area like the Kanawha Valley in West Virginia becoming what was called "the American Ruhr. "By 1900 all the coalfields in West Virginia....were in full production." Lumbering also became an important Appalachian industry.
    Tourism was another commercial activity that invaded the cultural traditional of Appalachian society, aided by the development of the National Forests of Appalachia and the emergence of The Great Smoky Mountain National Park.. However, the exploitation of region's fossil fuels was the major industrial invasion.
    The author states that Appalachia went from a plutocracy to the Welfare State and back again to the present governing by the rich and powerful. With the collapse of the country's market system during the Depression new life came into the yeoman system of self-sufficient agriculture. "Because of the great economic maladjustments in Appalachia's major industries....large numbers of people were able to qualify for welfare benefits"....with the nations welfare system growing out of New Deal reform measurers. The War on Poverty, 1964 to 1968, resulted in 1965 of the formation of the Appalachian Regional Commission which remains active today benefiting the region. Regarding welfare reform, the author makes the interesting observation that "Even yet in Appalachia, it may be that the only reform that can succeed must be seen through the lens of yeomanry."
    The text notes "...the region's society is far more diversified than the traditional picture painted as a stable enclave of Anglo-Saxon, Scotch-Irish, and Germans." The 1930s and WWII brought important changes to the Appalachian culture. During WWII, there was a mass migration of Appalachians north for employment. Also, there was the wartime industrial growth in Appalachian fossil fuel extraction and the development of the chemical industry in West Virginia. Unfortunately, the text notes "The regional picture in Appalachia since the 1980s has been generally gloomy."
    Chapter 13 discusses the Appalachian Mind noting that "....the area began to find its own scholarly voice soon after World War II" and states this scholarship betrays a strong anger against American corporate capitalism and "....attests to the kind of tragic picture that Appalachian history presents."
    The final chapter discusses the future of Appalachia noting "As coal and agriculture,...., move into further decline, the essentially insatiable industries of education, health services, recreation, and tourism will provide the major job opportunities in the future." Regarding the future, the text concludes " There is, and in fact has always been, a place for a viable, yeomanesque-style of life that is attractive to those unwilling or unable to join the mainstream's affluence." Shades of today's politician's statements about "the family farm."
    The Source listing for this book is excellent. Instead of a long alphabetical and/or type listing of sources, sources are listed separately for each chapter so that the reader can determine the author's sources plus read in further depth if desired.
    The only technical error I noted is on page 200 where the author stated that the nuclear fuel for the atomic bombs was processed "At its vast Centrifugal Plant, Oak Ridge...." The fuel for these bombs was processed at the Oak Gaseous Diffusion Plant NOT at a Centrifugal Plant. An Oak Ridge Centrifugal test loop wasn't built until the 1970s