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by Darren Staloff

ePub Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson: The Politics of Enlightenment and the American Founding download
Author:
Darren Staloff
ISBN13:
978-0809077847
ISBN:
0809077841
Language:
Publisher:
Hill and Wang; First Edition edition (July 4, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1170 kb
Fb2 file:
1126 kb
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
159

Alexander Hamilton, the worldly New Yorker; John Adams, the curmudgeonly Yankee; Thomas Jefferson, the visionary Virginia squire-each governed their public lives by Enlightenment principles, and for each their relationship to the politics of Enlightenment was transformed by the struggle.

Alexander Hamilton, the worldly New Yorker; John Adams, the curmudgeonly Yankee; Thomas Jefferson, the visionary Virginia squire-each governed their public lives by Enlightenment principles, and for each their relationship to the politics of Enlightenment was transformed by the struggle for American independence. Repeated humiliation on America's battlefields banished Hamilton's youthful idealism, leaving him a disciple of Enlightened realpolitik and the nation's leading exponent of modern statecraft.

Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson book. Where The Ideas for which We Stand came from. Alexander Hamilton, the worldly New Yorker; John Adams, the curmudgeonly Yankee; Thomas Jefferson, the visionary Virginia squire-each governed their public lives by Enlightenment principles, and for each their relationship to the politics of Enlightenment was transformed by the struggle for American independence. Repeated humiliation on America’s battlefields banished Hamilton’s youthful idealism, leaving him a disciple of Enlightened realpolitik and the nation’s leading exponent of modern statecraft.

Darren Staloff talked about his book [Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson: The Politics of Enlightenment and the .

Darren Staloff talked about his book, published by Hill and Wang. At the core of the American movement of Enlightenment politics were Alexander Hamilton, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson, each of whom believed in the fundamentals of Enlightenment but approached the application of Enlightenment from different sides. They represented different segments of society. He discussed their various political theories and battles over government. After his presentation the author answered questions from members of the audience.

Staloff makes a good effort in showing the influence of the Enlightenment on these particular founders and the making of our nation.

If you've ever dreamed of spending an evening with these distinguished Americans to understand what made them tick, Staloff delivers. Staloff makes a good effort in showing the influence of the Enlightenment on these particular founders and the making of our nation.

Staloff, Darren (2007). Thomas Jefferson, author of the declaration of American independence, Thomas Jefferson Bicentennial Commission, 35 pages; Book. Trueit, Trudi Strain (2009). Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson: The Politics of Enlightenment and the American Founding, Macmillan, 432 pages; Book. Stone, Eugene E. (1922). The story of Thomas Jefferson, Barse & Hopkins, 174 pages; e'Book. Thomas Jefferson, Marshall Cavendish, 112 pages

Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson: The Politics of Enlightenment and the American Founding.

Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson: The Politics of Enlightenment and the American Founding. In this incisively drawn book, Darren Staloff forcefully reminds us that America owes its guiding political traditions to three Founding Fathers whose lives embodied the collision of Europe's grand Enlightenment project with the birth of the nation.

You are at: AL. rg AWARDSGRANTS Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson: the politics of. .Winner Description: Staloff, Darren; Hill and Wang, 2005. rg AWARDSGRANTS Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson: the politics of enlightenment and the American founding. Book, Print & Media Awards. Title of a book, article or other published item (this will display to the public): Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson: the politics of enlightenment and the American founding. ISBN of the winning item: 0809077841. What type of media is this winner?: Book. Winner Detail Create Date: Thursday, September 23, 2010 - 07:28.

Adams, Jefferson : The Politics of Enlightenment and the American Founding.

Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson : The Politics of Enlightenment and the American Founding. by Darren M. Staloff. Alexander Hamilton, the worldly New Yorker; John Adams, the curmudgeonly Yankee; Thomas Jefferson, the visionary Virginia squire-each steered their public lives under the guideposts and constraints of Enlightenment principles, and for each their relationship to the politics of Enlightenment was transformed by the struggle for American independence.

Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson . The Politics of Enlightenment and the American Founding. Praise for Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson.

Where The Ideas for which We Stand came from.In this incisively drawn book, Darren Staloff forcefully reminds us that America owes its guiding political traditions to three Founding Fathers whose lives embodied the collision of Europe’s grand Enlightenment project with the birth of the nation. Alexander Hamilton, the worldly New Yorker; John Adams, the curmudgeonly Yankee; Thomas Jefferson, the visionary Virginia squire—each governed their public lives by Enlightenment principles, and for each their relationship to the politics of Enlightenment was transformed by the struggle for American independence. Repeated humiliation on America’s battlefields banished Hamilton’s youthful idealism, leaving him a disciple of Enlightened realpolitik and the nation’s leading exponent of modern statecraft. After ten years in Europe’s diplomatic trenches, Adams’s embrace of the politics of Enlightenment became increasingly skeptical in spirit, and his public posture became increasingly that of the gadfly of his country. And Jefferson’s frustrations as a Revolutionary governor in Virginia led him to go beyond his Enlightened worldview, and articulate a new and radical Romantic politics of principle. As a consequence, Americans demand a government that is both modern, constrained by checks and balances, and capable of appealing to our loftiest aspirations while adhering to decidedly pragmatic policies.
  • These 3 minds are fundemental To our national way of doing government. Staloff gives us a great insight into the genius and stupidity of these great founders and gives us insight into their world view. In view of the debate over what government should do today one should read this book.

  • A well-reasoned, well-researched, biographical sketch of three leading intellects of the founding generation, and a page-turner to boot. Of the book's 396 pages, historian Darren Staloff devotes 43 pages to the Enlightenment, 88 pages to Alexander Hamilton, 102 pages to John Adams, and 128 pages to Thomas Jefferson. If you've ever dreamed of spending an evening with these distinguished Americans to understand what made them tick, Staloff delivers. Harmilton and Jefferson are charming and brilliant--and ultimately inflexible in their beliefs--while Adams is decidedly contrarian, brutally honest, and his own man. In Stalof's narrative, Adams' prickly personality rankles but he's the one you come away respecting most.

    The chapter on Alexander Hamilton is mostly about Enlightenment economic principles and how Hamilton as Secretary of the Treasury applied them in resolving the young nation's crushing war debt and thereby jump-starting American capitalism. Hamilton was a visionary intent on recasting the nation's economy, from one of agriculture and IOUs to one of manufacturing and liquid capital. Hamilton may not have been an egalitarian, but he saw his economic policies as having a leveling effect on society. He did not want money tied up in land or hoarded by the wealthy few, but put to work as investment capital, free-flowing and changing hands, rewarding the initiative of anyone willing to work hard to get ahead. Hamilton was among the first abolitionists, pointing out that slavery was not cost-effective and a waste of human talent, and that African-Americans did in fact possess the same capacity for intellectual growth as those of European stock (a revolutionary idea that Jefferson would not or could not accept). Hamilton may have spoken like an elitist, but his economic policies were color-blind and class-free and therefore democratic. More than all other founders, Hamilton personafied Enlightenment ideals.

    John Adams, on the other hand, grew skeptical of Enlightenment ideals, especially after his time in Europe and meeting Rousseau. He came to loathe Franklin, Hamilton and even Jefferson, until his last years when he and Jefferson renewed their friendship through a series of now-famous letters. Adams was that rarest of individuals--an honest man--and came through for his country when it counted most. While in Europe he negotiated a series of loans with a consortium of Dutch financiers that proved vital to sustaining both the confederation government and the federal government that replaced it. Without the loans it's unlikely Hamilton's economic policies would have had the chance to work. As president Adams opposed Hamilton (and his own party) by negotiating the controversial Treaty of Mortefontaine thereby ending the Quasi-War with France. It split the Federalists and cost Adams a second term as president but history has vindicated his decision. Adams lived to see Jefferson get all the credit for the Declaration of Independence, his "Thoughts on Government" be eclipsed by Thomas Paine's "Common Sense," and his "Defense of the Constitution" and "Discourses on Davila" be dwarfed by "The Federalist" papers. He was correct when he predicted, "Mausoleums, statutes, and monuments will never be erected to me." It was not easy being John Adams.

    As with John Adams, France had a transforming effect on Thomas Jefferson. Unlike Adams he embraced Rousseau's romantic notions, tweaked them a bit and made them his own. Jefferson was an artist, mathematician, poet, dreamer, politician and, shall I say it, space cadet. He embraced John Locke but never warmed up to Adam Smith and David Hume. He was a purist who demonized anyone who opposed him politically. To paraphrase Walter Lippmann, he was captive of the pictures in his head. Like all successful presidents that followed him, he spoke like a Jeffersonian (advocating a small federal government) and acted like a Hamiltonian (expanding the powers of the presidency), the Louisiana Purchase being a prime example. Jefferson acknowledged that slavery was a great evil and devised a highly idealistic and thus unworkable plan for its abolishment. In the end, however, Jefferson was a staunch believer in states' rights and remained highly incensed with anyone who criticized "the peculiar institution" of slavery. He could never reconcile the world with the images in his head.

  • Written by a historian, this book presents the salient events in each man's political life in a concise, easy to follow fashion, so that non-specialists can grasp the essentials of American politics from the 1770s through Jefferson's second term. This book is a history book; the author is not reading the past in terms of a contemporary political agenda. The introduction of 43 pages is a masterful presentation of the major themes of the 18th century enlightenment. Are you taking an AP class in American history? This is the book for you.

  • Darren Staloff offers a compelling and insightful study on the influence of Enlightenment thought on Alexander Hamilton, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson. Staloff starts with an introduction on the Enlightenment, followed by a lengthy chapter on each of his three subjects in question, with a little more emphasis on Jefferson. Staloff asserts that the influence of the Enlightenment was most evidenced and put into practice in this country during the period of the framing of our government, and especially through the thoughts and actions of these three prominent founders.

    As Staloff mentioned, the Enlightenment was the combination of a diverse set of ideas and beliefs espoused by a host of philosophes, including Newton, Locke, Hume, Voltaire, Rousseau and so many others who helped define this new mode of thinking. They were believers in science and railed against `enthusiasm', defined as political and especially religious zeal. They believed in the importance of education, reason, commerce, and in most cases a more republican form of government. Staloff discusses this much better than I can. In essence, these philosophes and their writings contributed fodder to the three founders he discusses in their attempts to help frame our government and setting forth the direction they wanted the country to take.

    Hamilton was a most accomplished man in life, championing the American cause during its struggle against Great Britain, serving in the continental army as an aid to General Washington, primary author of many of the essays in the Federalist Papers supporting the Constitution, serving as Secretary of Treasury during the Washington Presidency, and symbolizing the primary voice for a stronger central government. Hamilton was never beloved, nor is he today. He had character traits that don't usually win admiration, but the power of his mind and his influence could not and cannot be denied. He was a controversial figure in his time and remains so. But as Staloff confirms, it was Hamilton's vision of America, with its emphasis on a stronger central government and increased wealth and power though industry and commerce that became the eventual reality. Hamilton really understood the essence of realpolitik.

    John Adams was without doubt one of the most dedicated men to the cause of American independence. Adams was a principled man who did not always take popular positions, but he took them because he believed it right, such as defending the British soldiers in the Boston Massacre incident. He worked tirelessly in his diplomatic positions, especially in securing loans from the Dutch. Adams also had a profound belief, as the others did, in the value of education as being the best safeguard to protect liberty. Through the crafting of the Constitution to its eventual implementation, Adams was a renowned constitutional theorist and contributed greatly to the concept of a system of checks and balances. Adams was not without his own faults. He could be excessively vain and easy to anger. Some criticized him for being monarchial and disdainful of the people. Adams, through his broad knowledge of history, developed a keen awareness of human nature, thus wanting a system of checks and balances in government.

    Staloff's last chapter is dedicated to the political life of a true Renaissance man, Thomas Jefferson. The gifted writer of the Declaration of Independence who, among other things, championed freedom of speech and religion as well as limited government, would also be the source of America's romantic vision. It was Jefferson, according to Staloff, who was the first to establish a vision for his country. In his case, he believed in the superiority of the independent yeoman farmer and a fiscally responsible as well as restrained federal government. He helped create the party system and ably led his political faction to power.

    Jefferson was seemingly both radical and conservative depending on the issue. He abhorred slavery, yet became defensive when he felt his home state of Virginia and the rest of the South was being assaulted by the political and economic forces of the North. Jefferson saw the dangers of slavery and its threat to the Union, yet he became a forceful advocate for states' rights and did little to hinder the `peculiar institution'. He was more radical in his belief in the value and necessities of periodic revolutions as a means to stop the growth of oppressive and unchecked governments that threatened the liberties of the people. Regardless of what you thought of the man and the society he was part of, his brilliance and contributions, like those of Hamilton and Adams, were profuse and far-reaching.

    Staloff makes a good effort in showing the influence of the Enlightenment on these particular founders and the making of our nation. Its influence was undeniable, but it wasn't the only influence. Many of these men looked to the Greek and Roman models and the developments in the British state. Much has been written recently on the founders and the early history of our republic and that's an understatement. His portraits of these three distinguished founders are well worth reading, even if there isn't a lot of new information. A solid, well thought out book.