mostraligabue
» » Bloody Lowndes: Civil Rights and Black Power in Alabama’s Black Belt

ePub Bloody Lowndes: Civil Rights and Black Power in Alabama’s Black Belt download

by Hasan Kwame Jeffries

ePub Bloody Lowndes: Civil Rights and Black Power in Alabama’s Black Belt download
Author:
Hasan Kwame Jeffries
ISBN13:
978-0814743058
ISBN:
0814743056
Language:
Publisher:
NYU Press; First Edition edition (July 1, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1906 kb
Fb2 file:
1841 kb
Other formats:
lrf txt rtf mobi
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
458

Hasan Kwame Jeffries’ Bloody Lowndes provides a nuanced portrait of the marriage between federal policy initiatives and local activism in the battle to dismantle Jim Crow, focusing on the months from March 1965 through November 1966 when SNCC workers, led by Stokely.

Hasan Kwame Jeffries’ Bloody Lowndes provides a nuanced portrait of the marriage between federal policy initiatives and local activism in the battle to dismantle Jim Crow, focusing on the months from March 1965 through November 1966 when SNCC workers, led by Stokely Carmichael, were active in Lowndes County, Alabama.

Hasan Jeffries work in Bloody Lowndes draws the readers attention to the fight for civil rights and voting rights in a violent area of Alabama during the 1950s and 1960s. Jeffries is able to expose the early works for SNCC and Stokely Carmichael in this work and introduces the reader to the Lowndes County Freedom Organization which organized itself as a political party for African Americans in Lowndes County and used the Black Panther as its image.

Winner of the 2010 Clinton Jackson Coley Award for the best book on local history from the Alabama Historical .

Winner of the 2010 Clinton Jackson Coley Award for the best book on local history from the Alabama Historical Association. Early in 1966, African Americans in rural Lowndes County, Alabama, aided by activists from the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), established an all-black, independent political party called the Lowndes County Freedom Organization (LCFO). Jim Crow was a grim reality in Lowndes County, Alabama, at the beginning of 1965.

10 жутких фильмов ужасов (последних лет)!

Hasan Kwame Jeffries Epilogue: That Black Dirt Gets in Your Soul: The Fight for Freedom Rights in the Days Ahead.

Hasan Kwame Jeffries. Published by: NYU Press. eISBN: 978-0-8147-4365-2. Epilogue: That Black Dirt Gets in Your Soul: The Fight for Freedom Rights in the Days Ahead. Catherine Coleman Flowers came of age in Lowndes County, having moved there from Birmingham in 1968 when she was ten years old.

Hasan Kwame Jeffries is Associate Professor of History at The Ohio State University, where he holds a joint appointment at the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity. Библиографические данные. Bloody Lowndes: Civil Rights and Black Power in Alabama's Black Belt. Hasan Kwame Jeffries. Издание: иллюстрированное, перепечатанное.

Just as Black Power activists focused on community control of schools and politics, the movement took a major . New York: Vintage Books. p. 114. ISBN 0679743138.

Just as Black Power activists focused on community control of schools and politics, the movement took a major interest in creating and controlling its own media institutions. Most famously, the Black Panther Party produced the Black Panther newspaper, which proved to be one of the BPP's most influential tools for disseminating its message and recruiting new members. 187. ISBN 9780814743065.

by Hasan Kwame Jeffries. History of the role that activists in Lowndes County played in spurring Black activists nationwide to fight for civil and human rights in new and more radical ways.

Among the books on the topic that merit mention include Michael Fischbach’s Black Power and Palestine: Transnational Countries of Color (2018); Ashley Farmer’s Remaking Black Power: How Black Women Transformed an Era (2017); Tom Davies’ Mainstreaming Black Power (2017).

Among the books on the topic that merit mention include Michael Fischbach’s Black Power and Palestine: Transnational Countries of Color (2018); Ashley Farmer’s Remaking Black Power: How Black Women Transformed an Era (2017); Tom Davies’ Mainstreaming Black Power (2017); Hasan Kwame Jeffries’ Bloody Lowndes: Civil Rights and Black Power in Alabama’s Black Belt (2009.

Winner of the 2010 Clinton Jackson Coley Award for the best book on local history from the Alabama Historical Association

Early in 1966, African Americans in rural Lowndes County, Alabama, aided by activists from the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), established an all-black, independent political party called the Lowndes County Freedom Organization (LCFO). The group, whose ballot symbol was a snarling black panther, was formed in part to protest the barriers to black enfranchisement that had for decades kept every single African American of voting age off the county’s registration books. Even after the passage of the Voting Rights Act, most African Americans in this overwhelmingly black county remained too scared even to try to register. Their fear stemmed from the county’s long, bloody history of whites retaliating against blacks who strove to exert the freedom granted to them after the Civil War.

Amid this environment of intimidation and disempowerment, African Americans in Lowndes County viewed the LCFO as the best vehicle for concrete change. Their radical experiment in democratic politics inspired black people throughout the country, from SNCC organizer Stokely Carmichael who used the Lowndes County program as the blueprint for Black Power, to California-based activists Bobby Seale and Huey P. Newton, who adopted the LCFO panther as the namesake for their new, grassroots organization: the Black Panther Party for Self Defense. This party and its adopted symbol went on to become the national organization of black militancy in the 1960s and 1970s, yet long-obscured is the crucial role that Lowndes County“historically a bastion of white supremacy”played in spurring black activists nationwide to fight for civil and human rights in new and more radical ways.

Drawing on an impressive array of sources ranging from government documents to personal interviews with Lowndes County residents and SNCC activists, Hasan Kwame Jeffries tells, for the first time, the remarkable full story of the Lowndes County freedom struggle and its contribution to the larger civil rights movement. Bridging the gaping hole in the literature between civil rights organizing and Black Power politics, Bloody Lowndes offers a new paradigm for understanding the civil rights movement.

  • If you have a general understanding of the civil rights movement but want to take a closer look at how one particular community mobilized and progressed, this book is a great place to start. You will feel all sorts of emotions while reading this book, from anger to pride to disappointment to hope. Jeffries' writing is superb, as is his research. This is just a very, very good book.

    The only challenge to following a book like this is the dearth of well-known players, which can make it tough to remember who did what. But Jeffries does a wonderful job of introducing us to the movement leaders, as well as the men and women who worked tirelessly to sustain white supremacy. I felt like I was almost part of the community while reading the book, and not every history book can totally immerse the reader like that.

    In terms of style, he provides a nice introduction of race relations in Lowndes County from Reconstruction to the 1960s, then gets into great detail of the movement from 1965-1966, following both a chronological and thematic approach that made it a smooth read and easy to follow. His last chapter covered a very broad period almost up to the present. And each chapter ends with a nice summary of what you just read.

    I learned about the great grassroots work done by SNCC and Stokely Carmichael, as well as the particular structural impediments to progress that were built into these rural southern communities. Despite all the effort to change the education, law enforcement, electoral and political systems in Lowndes County, progress was remarkably slow because of the power wielded by a determined, united minority of whites. Courageous activists made great progress toward righting many wrongs, but the system and various other factors limited the advancements.

    This is a great book by a young historian, and I hope there's more from him in the future.

  • I was Super Stoked to receive this amazing book on time and as promised, Thank You!

  • Black Power was more than a slogan in rural Lowndes County in the 1960's; it was a call to action. Jeffries's book positions Lowndes County as the scene of one of SNCC's finest periods of community organizing. Jeffries scrupulously details both grassroots and legal actions through an activist scholar's eye. The fact that he moved to and lived with the people of Lowndes while he authored this book brings an authenticity and compassion that other historians lack, while not compromising his objectivity.

    Many people have heard of Lowndes County due to the murder of white seminary student Jonathan Daniels (August 20, 1965) who stepped in front of SNCC workers as they were coming out of a store. Although Jeffries touches on this outrageous incident, he reminds us of the daily danger faced by the Black community and why they welcomed the workers and strategies of SNCC. The reader is invited to share in the celebration of local people who fought to overthrow the minority white power structure and take their rightful place in leadership positions, and in history.

    Maria Gitin, Civil Rights Veteran (Wilcox County Al) and author of "This Bright Light of Ours: Stories from the Voting Rights Fight, University of Alabama Press 2014.

  • I LOVED this book. I had to read it for a class, so I was dreading it, but it was one of the best books I've ever read. Really thorough analysis of the importance of Lowndes County during the civil rights movement.

  • This is a deep text, at once local and universal. The author has plumbed some recondite archives, oral no less than archival, to compose a text astute of argument and lucid of prose. The stimulating role of external agitation (any number of major figures from the national black freedom struggle appear here), the depth of the local commitment to transformation, the legacy of the civil rights organizing tradition, the ideological impact of black power--all find a harmonious synthesis in this outstanding work. BLOODY LOWNDES is also a disquisition on the possibilities, and the perils, of holding political power. It is a major contribution to scholarship. The bar has been raised. We have here the standard by which future studies on the permeable and imprecise boundaries between civil rights and black power, and specificity and universality of black power, must be judged. Three cheers for Professor Jeffries!!!

  • loved the history of my hometown and the struggle of my people to have the rights as everybody else in the "United States"

  • A bold and insightful portrait of the little Alabama county that changed the world. I live in Lowndes County, Alabama and was thrilled that someone put their time and talents into writing a history that's readable and fascinating. Loved it.

  • Jeffries brilliantly captures the history of the struggle to control the black labor force in Lowndes County, Alabama! It is a must read of all students that want to understand the impact of Reconstruction and race based politics on economic and political stagnation in rural Southern counties.