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ePub Something's Rising: Appalachians Fighting Mountaintop Removal download

by Lee Smith,Hal Crowther,Silas House

ePub Something's Rising: Appalachians Fighting Mountaintop Removal download
Author:
Lee Smith,Hal Crowther,Silas House
ISBN13:
978-0813133836
ISBN:
0813133831
Language:
Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky; Reprint edition (January 5, 2011)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1568 kb
Fb2 file:
1991 kb
Other formats:
mbr mobi lit docx
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
366

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Something's Rising book. Start by marking Something's Rising: Appalachians Fighting Mountaintop Removal as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This book is printed on acid-free recycled paper meeting the requirements of the American National Standard for Permanence in Paper for Printed Library Materials. Manufactured in the United States of America

Foreword by Lee Smith. The university press of kentucky. The oral narratives in this book reflect the experiences and opinions of the interviewees and do not necessarily reflect the views of the authors or the University Press of Kentucky. This book is printed on acid-free recycled paper meeting the requirements of the American National Standard for Permanence in Paper for Printed Library Materials. Manufactured in the United States of America. Member of the Association of.

Silas House And Jason Howard. Among the heroes who inspired this book are Ollie The Widow Combs, Dan Gibson, Judy Hensley, Aunt Molly Jackson, Florence King, Florence Reece, Bill Strode, and Nellie Woolum. Among the heroes who inspired this book are Ollie The Widow Combs, Dan Gibson, Judy Hensley, Aunt Molly Jackson, Florence King, Florence Reece, Bill Strode, and Nellie Woolum ved by the dedication of the more than 1,200 people who participated in I Love Mountains Day 2008; we extend all of them our gratitude

Silas House and Jason Howard are experts on the history of resistance in Appalachia, the legacy of exploitation .

Silas House and Jason Howard are experts on the history of resistance in Appalachia, the legacy of exploitation of the region's natural resources, and area's unique culture and landscape. This lyrical and informative text provides a critical perspective on a powerful industry. The cumulative effect of these stories is stunning and powerful.

Silas House and Jason Howard are both sons of Appalachia, their family lives intertwined with coal mining. Something’s Risingbears witness to the people they love and the lives they have lived-and still live, with great courage, right here in Appalachia.

Taken together, these voices stand as a testament of what it means to be an Appalachian and demonstrate the value of preserving a culture's history and spirit through the stories of its people. The authors have chosen twelve unique voices including Jean Ritchie, the "mother of folk," who doesn't let her eighty-six years slow down her fighting spirit; Judy Bonds, a tough-talking coal miner's daughter; Kathy Mattea, the beloved country singer who believes that cooperation is the key to the batt≤ Larry Bush, who doesn't back down even when speeding.

Silas House and Jason Howard each read an expert from their book Something’s Rising: Appalachians Fighting Mountaintop Removal (University Press of Kentucky; March 16, 2009). The authors, Kentucky natives, are activists in the movement against mountaintop removal mining. They collected stories of the generations-long fight to prevent what they call the destruction of their land and their way of life, for the sake of the coal industry. Then Erik Reece spoke about mining and energy policy. Silas House is a bestselling novelist whose non-fiction has been published in Newsday, among others

Mobile version (beta). Mobile version (beta).

Silas House, Jason Howard, Lee Smith

Silas House, Jason Howard, Lee Smith. Like an old-fashioned hymn sung in rounds, Something's Rising gives a stirring voice to the lives, culture, and determination of the people fighting the destructive practice of mountaintop removal in the coalfields of central Appalachia. Developed as an alternative to strip mining, mountaintop removal mining consists of blasting.

Like an old-fashioned hymn sung in rounds, Something's Rising gives a stirring voice to the lives, culture, and determination of the people fighting the destructive practice of mountaintop removal in the coalfields of central Appalachia. Each person's story, unique and unfiltered, articulates the hardship of living in these majestic mountains amid the daily desecration of the land by the coal industry because of America's insistence on cheap energy. Developed as an alternative to strip mining, mountaintop removal mining consists of blasting away the tops of mountains, dumping waste into the valleys, and retrieving the exposed coal. This process buries streams, pollutes wells and waterways, and alters fragile ecologies in the region. The people who live, work, and raise families in central Appalachia face not only the physical destruction of their land but also the loss of their culture and health in a society dominated by the consequences of mountaintop removal. Included here are oral histories from Jean Ritchie, "the mother of folk," who doesn't let her eighty-six years slow down her fighting spirit; Judy Bonds, a tough-talking coal-miner's daughter; Kathy Mattea, the beloved country singer who believes cooperation is the key to winning the battle; Jack Spadaro, the heroic whistle-blower who has risked everything to share his insider knowledge of federal mining agencies; Larry Bush, who doesn't back down even when speeding coal trucks are used to intimidate him; Denise Giardina, a celebrated writer who ran for governor to bring attention to the issue; and many more. The book features both well-known activists and people rarely in the media. Each oral history is prefaced with a biographical essay that vividly establishes the interview settings and the subjects' connections to their region. Written and edited by native sons of the mountains, this compelling book captures a fever-pitch moment in the movement against mountaintop removal. Silas House and Jason Howard are experts on the history of resistance in Appalachia, the legacy of exploitation of the region's natural resources, and area's unique culture and landscape. This lyrical and informative text provides a critical perspective on a powerful industry. The cumulative effect of these stories is stunning and powerful. Something's Rising will long stand as a testament to the social and ecological consequences of energy at any cost and will be especially welcomed by readers of Appalachian studies, environmental science, and by all who value the mountain's majesty―our national heritage.
  • This is a great work of oral history and environmental literature not from academics or outside observers but rather from the people on the receiving end of a raw deal. Coal is big money for capital but a curse for labor. Appalachia contains some of the poorest zip codes in the United States, and yet billions of dollars in natural resources have been harvested from these very counties. This short book attempts to explain some of the reasons why this is so. And this is nothing new. Ballad singer Addie Graham saw it first hand decades ago:

    "You don't know the wealth that went out of that country. It'd kill you to know of it. When the big companies came in they bought all the timber in that country, all through it . . . . All that walnut timber, millions of dollars worth, went out of there. The wealth that was in that country, they never got nothing much for it; it went too cheap"

    What happened with timber and other natural resources happened with coal, and it continues to this day. Wealth goes out and the people stay poor and despised, the butt of jokes in the 'liberal' media.

    The thirteen activists and artists portrayed here and the the editors of this book attempt to redress this imbalance.

  • This book, a book about grass roots struggle against big coal and the devastation of the Appalachian mountains, is an important book. It is a book of beautifully written stories, full of imagery. I can see eighty-six-year-old Jean Ritchie's eyes in the rich descriptions and almost hear her sing. These descriptions make me want to sit at her feet, hear her voice and her wisdom. All the people in the book are portrayed as real people I'd like to meet, their stories so compelling, their voices sincere. But most of all, though, this book makes me heartsick for a way of life that has been, not lost, but stolen or sold, it inspires me to join this fight against the ravages of coal.
    Coal has done little for the people of Appalachia but make us poor, use our land and our people badly, and destroy the mountains with which we identify. Something's Rising is a cry for justice, for a way of life, a warning for the people of Appalachia and America to wake up before it is too late, before our mountains are gone,our streams polluted beyond reclamation. It should be required reading, not in every history, geography and science class in high school and college, but for every legislator in this country,every man or woman who was elected on claims he or she represents "the people."

  • Excellent book with personal insights into a very polarized issue in Appalachia. It is good to hear the people speak relating personal stories often overlooked in the conflict between resource extraction from outside corporations and the health issues it causes.

  • This book is very powerful and a true work from people like you and I who support preserving the environment and local culture. Very eye opening and inspirational to people all over who have experienced loss at the hands of greedy corporations.

  • Bought for Appalachian Studies class. I was not disappointed.

  • Mountains that are 650 million years old are among the first creations on this planet. They are being scraped, blasted, and hauled into valleys where the acids and metals are poisoning streams.

  • very moving and disturbing that this is being done to the earth God created for us.

  • This book changed my life forever. After reading it, I became an activist against the horrible practice of mountain top removal coal mining.