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ePub Sparta (Edinburgh Readings on the Ancient World) download

by Michael Whitby

ePub Sparta (Edinburgh Readings on the Ancient World) download
Author:
Michael Whitby
ISBN13:
978-0748612932
ISBN:
0748612939
Language:
Publisher:
Edinburgh Univ Pr (September 30, 2001)
Category:
Subcategory:
Ancient Civilizations
ePub file:
1801 kb
Fb2 file:
1849 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
209

Michael Whitby's "Sparta", better than any other collection on Sparta I've read, should be required reading for the ancient greekophile seeking info . The authors are among the foremost scholars of ancient Sparta in the world. The conglomerate of historians include Paul Cartledge, .

Michael Whitby's "Sparta", better than any other collection on Sparta I've read, should be required reading for the ancient greekophile seeking info on the Spartans. 9 people found this helpful. de Ste Croix and A. Andrewes, among others. While the book is basically written for the novice and serious classical history buff alike, it would nonetheless be prudent to have some degree of familiarity with the Spartans prior to turning the front cover.

The Edinburgh Readings on the Ancient World is a book series that aims to provide an introduction to key themes in the history of the ancient world. The series is published by Edinburgh University Press. Each volume takes the form of an introduction by a specialist in the field followed by translations of primary sources, explanations of key terms and other material. Sparta, Michael Whitby, 2001. Greeks And Barbarians, Thomas Harrison, 2001.

Reading Genesis with Ancient Eyes by John Walton, P. Wright - Paul and the Faithfulness of God (University of Edinburgh. The Lords Prayer in Old English from the 11th century.

Reading Genesis with Ancient Eyes by John Walton, P. Edinburgh Readings on the Ancient World. Edinburgh University Press. Retrieved 10 October 2015.

on the Ancient World is a book series that aims to provide an introduction to key themes in the history of the ancient world. The series is published by Edinburgh University Press Titles. The Ancient Economy, Walter Scheidel and Sitta von Reden, 2002.

by Michael Whitby First published October 25th 2001. Showing 1-6 of 6. Sparta (Paperback). Published November 11th 2001 by Routledge. Paperback, 296 pages. ISBN: 0415939577 (ISBN13: 9780415939577).

Michael Whitby presents essays on key aspects of Spartan history and society, by some of the leading classicists in the world, such as Paul Cartledge, Anton Powell, and Stephen Hodkinson. ISBN13:9780415939577. Release Date:November 2001.

Ancient world Jonathan Edmondson Edinburgh University Press. The Edinburgh Readings on the Ancient World is a book series that aims to provide an introduction to key themes in the history of the ancient world.

The Ancient Economy (Edinburgh Readings on the Ancient World). Ancient Greece: From the Mycenaean Palaces to the Age of Homer. Edinburgh Leventis Studies . Pp. Xxiv + 695, Figs, Ills, Maps.

Sparta, Michael Whitby, 2001. Edinburgh University Press achieved combined book and journal revenues of over £. 7m for the year ending 31 July 2013, a 7% increase on the previous year. He has written several books on the history of childhood, sexuality and sport in the ancient world

Sparta, Michael Whitby, 2001. Ancient Greece was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages of the 12th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity. He has written several books on the history of childhood, sexuality and sport in the ancient world. Athenian democracy developed around the sixth century BC in the Greek city-state of Athens, comprising the city of Athens and the surrounding territory of Attica, and is often described as the first known democracy in the world.

This volume introduces the reader to every important aspect of the society of Sparta, the dominant power in southern Greece from the seventh century BC and the great rival of democratic Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries. During this period Sparta evolved a unique social and politicalsystem that combined egalitarian structures, military ideals and brutal oppression, and permitted male citizens to focus on the practice of war. The system fascinated scholars at the time and has done so ever since: its outlines are clear, but because of the nature of the evidence almost alldetailed aspects of Spartan social practices and constitutional affairs are open to debate. Michael Whitby introduces and presents some of the most outstanding contributions to the history of Sparta. Together they cover the key aspects of Spartan history and society: its problematic early history, social and economic organisation (especially the different categories of citizens andnon-citizens), international relations and military achievements, religious practices and culture, the role of women, and sexual conduct and values. He has chosen them partly for their clarity and importance, and partly too for the questions they raise about the problems of studying Sparta - whatevidence to consider, what precautions need to be observed in considering it, and what sorts of conclusions it is reasonable to draw. His intention is not to pretend that definitive answers can be offered to the main problems of Sparta but to encourage readers to formulate their own approaches andjudgements with due respect for the limitations of the evidence and awareness of the benefits of informed speculation.
  • This book is a collection of essays by several experts on Sparta covering all the major aspects of their culture. Those used to studying such books may be jaded by the number of them that seem to serve no other purpose than to give the various contributors a place to hear themselves talk while adding little to the reader's knowledge as they verbalize vague thought processes that lead to theories on relatively insignificant matters. Not so this one.

    Laid out in a logical progression, the various essays provide the "meat-and-potatos" of Spartanology including coverage of land ownership, sexuality, perioicoi, reliability of early spartan history, Sparta's decline, etc. Also, the contributors have mostly written their articles in an accessible fashion.

    Like the previous reviewer said, this book may require some knowledge of Sparta, and Paul Cartledge's "the Spartans" makes the perfect introduction to this volume, almost like 2 halves makiing a whole.

    Michael Whitby's "Sparta", better than any other collection on Sparta I've read, should be required reading for the ancient greekophile seeking info on the Spartans.

  • If classical history is your interest, this is a book you need to check out. It covers a broad array of topics concerning the ancient Spartans, from their emergence onto the world-historical stage to their ultimate decline at the Battle of Leuctria in 371BCE. Along the way we learn about their customs, the male educational system (the Agoge), their economic base, the subjection of the Helots, their relations with other Greek states and much more.
    The present book is a collection of essays that cover all of these topics and more. The authors are among the foremost scholars of ancient Sparta in the world. The conglomerate of historians include Paul Cartledge, G.E.M. de Ste Croix and A. Andrewes, among others.
    While the book is basically written for the novice and serious classical history buff alike, it would nonetheless be prudent to have some degree of familiarity with the Spartans prior to turning the front cover. Those persons who pick this up without any prior knowledge of Spartan history will be apt to get lost.
    This book is highly recommended for people who have a basic understanding of Laconian history. You won't find a better collection of essays on the Spartans anywhere else; of that much I am certain.

  • Pam by far has written the best review for this book. I have read as much as I can but can't read much at a time because it is so dry. The way everything is presented in this book was a downer for me. It is written in a way to form your own opinions, but then doesn't give enough detailed and vital information to even do so with a clear vision and interest. It looks like someone just copied and pasted information from many different sources to make a book. I gave 3 stars due to the information on the subject matter IF it is correct. I also wanted to know more about the military operations in Sparta. Above all, it is not worth $25, I would purchase a used one if you're still interested.

  • Sparta was compiled by Michael Whitby as a reader for college students. It follows the familiar academic pattern of a brief topic introduction followed by relevant essays.

    Who should NOT consider reading this book?

    Readers of "popular" histories are likely to find this material dry. Indeed "Sparta" doesn't even have a cohesive narrative story.

    The book will also likely not satisfy readers looking for THE ANSWER to any particular question. The approach is academic, which means that frequently you'll be presented with contradictory evidence, various researchers' opinions, and then the current author's attempt to adjudicating the "facts". The reader can expect a lot of conversation about uncertainty, with discussions of why this or that authoritative source bears listening to. Arguments will be along the lines of: XXX says this about how Herodotus may have misunderstood or misrepresented the term YYY. With a discussion following of how this affects the interpretation of the inheritance laws, or some such similar topic.

    Who should consider reading this book?

    This book should appeal to people who have an interest in one of the selected topics (see Table of Contents). The reader who will be best served by the book will have a broad (but not necessarily in-depth) background in ancient Greek history, politics and literary sources. Which is not to say that you have to be an expert. I certainly am not a classicist and I enjoyed the articles.

    Considerations and Summary :::
    If you are looking for an introduction to Sparta and things Grecian, continue on with your search. "Sparta" is not a book for novices. You don't need to know any ancient Greek, but you aren't going to get much from this volume unless you already have a basic grasp of Greek sources and history.

    In this book, the authors deal with problems of evidence. How to evaluate and weigh historical records. They adjudicate facts and address the problems inherent in historical evidence.

    A reader, once they engage the material, will certainly emerge not only better educated about Sparta, but in how a historian works and thinks. And overall, I would have no trouble recommending this book to others as long as they know that it's an academic tome.

    Pam T.
    mom and reviewer at PageInHistory .com