mostraligabue
» » The Prehistory of Asia Minor: From Complex Hunter-Gatherers to Early Urban Societies

ePub The Prehistory of Asia Minor: From Complex Hunter-Gatherers to Early Urban Societies download

by Bleda S. Düring

ePub The Prehistory of Asia Minor: From Complex Hunter-Gatherers to Early Urban Societies download
Author:
Bleda S. Düring
ISBN13:
978-0521763134
ISBN:
0521763134
Language:
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (December 31, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Ancient Civilizations
ePub file:
1491 kb
Fb2 file:
1597 kb
Other formats:
azw txt doc lit
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
275

During this period, human societies moved from small-scale hunter-gatherer groups to complex and hierarchical .

During this period, human societies moved from small-scale hunter-gatherer groups to complex and hierarchical communities. In this book, Bleda S. Düring offers an archaeological analysis of Asia Minor, the area equated with much of modern-day Turkey, from 20, 000 to 2000 BC. During this period, human societies moved from small-scale hunter-gatherer groups to complex and hierarchical communities with economies based on agriculture and industry.

A hunter-gatherer is a human living in a society in which most or all food is obtained by foraging (collecting wild plants and pursuing wild animals). Hunter-gatherer societies stand in contrast to agricultural societies, which rely mainly on domesticated species. Hunting and gathering was humanity's first and most successful adaptation, occupying at least 90 percent of human history

The Prehistory of Asia Minor: From Complex Hunter-Gatherers to Early Urban Societies.

In this book, Bleda During offers an archaeological analysis of Asia Minor, the area equated with much of modern-day .

In this book, Bleda During offers an archaeological analysis of Asia Minor, the area equated with much of modern-day Turkey, from 20,000 to 2,000 BC. During this period human societies moved from small-scale hunter-gatherer groups to complex and hierarchical communities with economies based on agriculture and industry. Dr. During traces the spread of the Neolithic way of l In this book, Bleda During offers an archaeological analysis of Asia Minor, the area equated with much of modern-day Turkey, from 20,000 to 2,000 BC.

During this period human societies moved from small-scale hunter-gatherer groups to complex and .

During this period human societies moved from small-scale hunter-gatherer groups to complex and hierarchical communities with economies based on agriculture and industry. Situated at the junction between Europe and Asia, Asia Minor has often been perceived as a bridge for the movement of technologies and ideas.

In this book, Bleda Düring offers an archaeological analysis of Asia Minor, the area equated with much of. .By contrast, this book argues that cultural developments followed a distinctive trajectory in Asia Minor from as early as 9,000 BC. Год: 2010. Издание: 1. Язык: english.

In this book, Bleda Düring offers an archaeological analysis of Asia Minor, the area equated with much of modern-day Turkey, from 20,000 to 2,000 BC.

Keywords: prehistory, Asia Minor, tables, ISBN, paperback, urban societies, Bleda, hardback, XIV.

By (author) Bleda S During. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Chapter one the land of asia minor 4 chapter two archaeology in asia .

Chapter one the land of asia minor 4 chapter two archaeology in asia minor. 21. Chapter three hunter-gatherers of the epipalaeolithic and mesolithic (20,000-6000 вс). 31. Chapter four early farmers of the southern plateau (8500-6500 вс). 47. Chapter five neolithic dispersals (6500-5500 вс).

During this period human societies moved from small-scale hunter-gatherer groups to complex and hierarchical communities with economies based on agriculture and industry

During this period human societies moved from small-scale hunter-gatherer groups to complex and hierarchical communities with economies based on agriculture and industry. During traces the spread of the Neolithic way of life, which ultimately reached across Eurasia, and the emergence of key human developments, including the domestication of animals, metallurgy, fortified towns, and long-distance trading networks. Situated at the junction between Europe and Asia, Asia Minor has often been perceived as a bridge for the movement of technologies and ideas

In this book, Bleda Düring offers an archaeological analysis of Asia Minor, the area equated with much of modern-day Turkey, from 20,000 to 2,000 BC. During this period human societies moved from small-scale hunter-gatherer groups to complex and hierarchical communities with economies based on agriculture and industry. Dr. Düring traces the spread of the Neolithic way of life, which ultimately reached across Eurasia, and the emergence of key human developments, including the domestication of animals, metallurgy, fortified towns, and long-distance trading networks. Situated at the junction between Europe and Asia, Asia Minor has often been perceived as a bridge for the movement of technologies and ideas. By contrast, this book argues that cultural developments followed a distinctive trajectory in Asia Minor from as early as 9,000 BC.
  • This book provides a useful updated overview, synthesis, and literature review of Asia Minor prehistory from the Paleolithic through the Early Bronze Age. Expectably, the most insightful discussions are centered on those few sites that have been most extensively and methodically excavated and well published, and which have yielded the greatest and most significant arrays of archaeological objects. With the natural objective of comprehensiveness, there is also considerable discussion, in the aggregate rather lengthy, of comparatively unremarkable archaeological information from more-numerous sites that, as the author points out, have not been well dug and/or well published, or that have not yielded very extensive or remarkable materials: this rather unenlightening aspect of the book serves to illustrate the patchiness of archaeological data, resulting in part from historical research biases, in part from alluvial and urban masking, and in part from erosional or agricultural destruction. The author's principal overarching point is that Anatolia was not, as it has been historically misperceived, merely a roadway for transmission of Neolithic ways of life from the Fertile Crescent to Europe, but rather a region where Neolithic cultural evolutions were at least in part continuous from pre-existing indigenous Paleolithic and Mesolithic cultures, and so, at a minimum, semi-autochthonous. Stress is placed on the geographic diversity and idiosyncracies of various diachronic cultural "trajectories". Düring also posits a second Neolithic revolution of sorts (i.e., a Neolithic cultural dispersal) around 6,500 BCE, fully two millennia later than the earliest evidence of Neolithic traits in Anatolia around 8,500 BCE; here, however, he is unable to identify causes for such suspended dispersal, amid admittedly spotty archaeological data. We come away from this book with some truly fascinating information about materials-rich and well-studied sites, but all in all with a profound sense of an enduring gross ignorance owing to overall inadequacies in the scope of archaeological investigations in Turkey. The magnitude of the task can be well appreciated by considering a map of the comparatively well-understood site Çatalhöyük, showing areas excavated over decades, at very considerable aggregate organizational and operational cost: clearly, the great bulk of the mound remains untouched, and we can only guess at what has not been found. Guesswork about what has yet to be found across the great swathe of Anatolia is understandably unrewarding.

  • Excellent

  • Learn how civilization started, step by step. The pottery is beautiful, also the obsidian blades. Hypotheses about how trading developed, towns and cities.

  • This book is a summary of the archaeology of Asia Minor from about 8500 BC to 2000 BC, although Düring does mention the Epipalaeolithic/Mesolithic and early Holocene (roughly the years 20,000 BC to 6000 BC). The author explicitly aims to synthesise the research literature for the prehistory of Asia Minor. Thus this book draws together existing research in each area and time-horizon to give a broad overview of what is known, and to indicate where filling the gaps (by further research) would be desirable.

    The author uses many terms which are too specialist for the general reader, since the book is addressed more to the archaeological profession than to the general public, but the alternative would be the typical dumbing-down of concepts which is prevalent in the pop science literature. Therefore one does need to consult other books from time to time, or wikipedia. Similarly, the numerous place names will not be familiar to most readers. Turkish place names are difficult to remember for non-Turkish readers. It would have been helpful if the author had given translations for place names like Çatal-höyük (fork tumulus) and Kül-tepe (ash hill).

    This book makes clear that Anatolian culture and technology were impressively advanced at a very early date. I was surprised by the great antiquity of the settlements at Aşıklı Höyük (8500-7400 BC), Boncuklu Höyük (8500-7500 BC) and Çatalhöyük (7000-6000 BC), considering that the remains are so substantial. Also impressive was the clearly different culture and technology in Anatolia as compared to Mesopotamia. For example, the houses with no streets and no doors, which are entered through the roof, and burials under the floors of houses. A bit disappointing for me was the lack of explanation of how the prehistoric Anatolians made roofs so strong that people could walk and live on top of them. There's very little explanation of the structural design issues, particularly in regard to roofs and second storeys. The very impressive remains of settlements in 8500-6000 BC in Anatolia are probably the best part of the book. It is the buildings which are the most impressive. Archaeology books always have extensive coverage of pottery, for obvious reasons, and Anatolian pottery is not much more exciting than other ancient pottery.

    At many points, the author mentions surprisingly large amounts of food preparation equipment in rather small buildings. As one example, there is this description on page 210 of a hut in Ilıpınar 5B, about 5500-5400 BC, just south of the Sea of Marmara.

    "Here a series of sunken hut structures measuring about 2 by 3 metres were uncovered. They were dug about 40 centimetres into the mound and covered with plaster. In some cases, post holes were found along the perimeters of the huts, hinting at a superstructure that probably consisted of a wattle-and-daub roof. A number of the huts had a raised bench along one side. The centre of these huts usually included a range of features: oval domed ovens, grinding installations, plastered baskets, and a multitude of ceramic vessels. On the exterior of one of the huts a series of loom weights were found. These features and objects were very well preserved because some structures were burnt, resulting in, first, the preservation of plaster basket coatings, a textile fragment, and charred foodstuffs; and, second, a large number of objects and features in these spaces. For example, hut 5 contained 17 pots, and hut 3 contained 11 pots and 2 plastered baskets. In both cases, the total capacity of these containers was about 50 litres. This density of features and objects begs the question of where people were living in these structures."

    This book has the kind of professional quality that is much more substantial and technical than the average coffee-table archaeology picture book, but is entirely accessible to the non-archaeologist with occasional wikipedia look-ups. There are ample drawings and diagrams, and the text is clearly written with a passion for the subject, although subject to a strict academic discipline.