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by Daryn Lehoux

ePub What Did the Romans Know?: An Inquiry into Science and Worldmaking download
Author:
Daryn Lehoux
ISBN13:
978-0226471143
ISBN:
0226471144
Language:
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press (February 28, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
Ancient Civilizations
ePub file:
1215 kb
Fb2 file:
1954 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
400

Quite a lot, as Daryn Lehoux makes clear in this fascinating and much-needed contribution to the history and philosophy of ancient science.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Quite a lot, as Daryn Lehoux makes clear in this fascinating and much-needed contribution to the history and philosophy of ancient science. Lehoux contends that even though many of the Romans’ views about the natural world have no place in modern science-the umbrella-footed monsters and dog-headed people that roamed the earth and. What did the Romans know about their world?

I say our world because, as Lehoux makes clear from the.

No mere catalogue of accomplishments, multifaceted book brilliantly rethinks both the Roman and our .

No mere catalogue of accomplishments, multifaceted book brilliantly rethinks both the Roman and our own approaches to the cosmos. Between the coherent past world that the Romans made and the presumed timelessness of our scientific world, Lehoux leaves us not with an unbridgeable chasm but with his pragmatic realism, born at the confluence of ancient science, historical epistemology and the philosophy of science. May he continue to help us enter still further into what the Romans really knew and ponder what that should mean, in turn, for us. Courtney Roby, Cornell University Expositions.

Quite a lot, as Daryn Lehoux makes clear in this fascinating and much-needed contribution to the history .

Quite a lot, as Daryn Lehoux makes clear in this fascinating and much-needed contribution to the history and philosophy of ancient science.

Lehoux contends that even though many of the Romans' views about the natural world have no place in modern science-the umbrella-footed monsters and dog-headed . Similar books and articles.

Lehoux contends that even though many of the Romans' views about the natural world have no place in modern science-the umbrella-footed monsters and dog-headed people that roamed the earth and the.

Author:-Lehoux, Daryn. Title:-What Did the Romans Know?. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

Daryn Lehoux, "What Did the Romans Know?: An Inquiry into Science and Worldmaking". August 16, 2014, 3:18 pm. Daryn Lehoux.

Daryn Lehoux& new book will forever change the way you think about garlic and magnets. More from New Books in History

What did the Romans know about their world? Quite a lot, as Daryn Lehoux makes clear in this fascinating and much-needed contribution to the history and philosophy of ancient science. Michael H. Shank, Times Higher Education.

What did the Romans know about their world? Quite a lot, as Daryn Lehoux makes clear in this fascinating and much-needed contribution to the history and philosophy of ancient science. Lehoux contends that even though many of the Romans’ views about the natural world have no place in modern science—the umbrella-footed monsters and dog-headed people that roamed the earth and the stars that foretold human destinies—their claims turn out not to be so radically different from our own. Lehoux draws upon a wide range of sources from what is unquestionably the most prolific period of ancient science, from the first century BC to the second century AD. He begins with Cicero’s theologico-philosophical trilogy On the Nature of the Gods, On Divination, and On Fate, illustrating how Cicero’s engagement with nature is closely related to his concerns in politics, religion, and law. Lehoux then guides readers through highly technical works by Galen and Ptolemy, as well as the more philosophically oriented physics and cosmologies of Lucretius, Plutarch, and Seneca, all the while exploring the complex interrelationships between the objects of scientific inquiry and the norms, processes, and structures of that inquiry. This includes not only the tools and methods the Romans used to investigate nature, but also the Romans’ cultural, intellectual, political, and religious perspectives. Lehoux concludes by sketching a methodology that uses the historical material he has carefully explained to directly engage the philosophical questions of incommensurability, realism, and relativism. By situating Roman arguments about the natural world in their larger philosophical, political, and rhetorical contexts, What Did the Romans Know? demonstrates that the Romans had sophisticated and novel approaches to nature, approaches that were empirically rigorous, philosophically rich, and epistemologically complex.     

  • This book is not so much an analysis of Roman science as it is an analysis of how ancient Romans apprehended the world in which they lived. In this regard, the author succeeds brilliantly. He shows that ancient Romans had a significantly and dramatically different view of "reality" than modern humans, and that one can only understand them by understanding this worldview. Lehoux deconstructs primary Roman sources in order to reconstruct the Roman worldview. In my opinion, the book is more suited for academics than for non-academics since it tackles complicated concepts and uses the terminology of philosophy to elucidate them. However, for those who have a firm understanding of philosophy and ancient Rome, this book is an invaluable resource.

  • An authoritative work for scholars who are as much concerned with methodology as with a overview of what constituted Roman science (mainly Greek science, it appears, on the basis of this work).