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by Barry Strauss

ePub THE SPARTACUS WAR: THE REVOLT OF THE GLADIATORS download
Author:
Barry Strauss
ISBN13:
978-0297852674
ISBN:
0297852671
Language:
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster; Complete Numbers Starting with 1, 1st Ed edition (2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Ancient Civilizations
ePub file:
1473 kb
Fb2 file:
1852 kb
Other formats:
mbr rtf mbr azw
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
295

The Spartacus War - Barry Strauss. The great slave revolt of the gladiator Spartacus shook the Roman world of the first-century . as much as it fascinates us still two millennia later.

The Spartacus War - Barry Strauss. Praise for the spartacus war. " has all the excitement of a thriller. Victor Davis Hanson, Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow, Classics/Military History, the Hoover Institution.

With his fellow gladiators, Spartacus built an army of 60,000 soldiers and controlled the southern Italian countryside. A charismatic leader, he used religion to win support. An ex-soldier in the Roman army, Spartacus excelled in combat. The Spartacus War is the extraordinary story of the most famous slave rebellion in the ancient world, the fascinating true story behind a legend that has been the inspiration for novelists, filmmakers, and revolutionaries for 2,000 years.

The Spartacus War is the extraordinary story of the most famous slave rebellion in the ancient world. With his trademarks of extensive knowledge, insight, and great storytelling ability, Barry Strauss brings us as close as we can get to the enigmatic Spartacus, the slave who defied the Roman Republic. - Adrian Goldsworthy, author of Caesar: Life of a Colossus. Barry Strauss, professor of history and classics at Cornell University, is a leading expert on ancient military history.

The Spartacus War. BARRY STRAUSS. The Spartacus War describes the complexity of slave revolts too. We do not know if Spartacus wanted to abolish slavery but, if so, he aimed low. He and his men freed only gladiators, farmers and shepherds. A Weidenfeld & Nicolson ebook. First published in Great Britain in 2009. by Weidenfeld & Nicolson. They avoided urban slaves, a softer and more elite group than rural workers. They rallied slaves to the cry not only of freedom but also to the themes of nationalism, religion, revenge and loot. Another paradox: they might have been liberators but the rebels brought ruin.

We don’t know when the Thracian woman made her prophecy. Perhaps it only came later, when the revolt of the gladiators was under way. But if she predicted the future while Spartacus was still in Capua or even before, in Rome, then it might have been the spark that lit the rebellion. In the first century BC both rebels and Romans took seers very seriously.

The Spartacus War book. Starting with only seventy-four men, a gladiator named Spartacus incited a rebellion that threatened Rome itself.

Barry Strauss, professor of history and classics at Cornell University, is a leading expert on ancient military .

Barry Strauss, professor of history and classics at Cornell University, is a leading expert on ancient military history.

Given the big picture, the gladiators' revolt might have seemed minor. Capua had seen a slave revolt before, in 104 . which had been crushed by barely the number of troops in a single legion - four thousand infantry and four hundred cavalry, for a total of 4,400 men - led by a praetor, a leading Roman public official. So the obvious policy in 73 was to send in the praetor.

Spartacus was a gladiator who led a slave revolt against the Romans. Spartacus’s own men probably vetoed him, writes Barry Strauss, a Classics professor at Cornell University, in his book The Spartacus War (Simon & Schuster, 2009). In the past, they had never wanted to leave Italy; now success might have gone to their heads and aroused visions of Rome in flames. He notes that other factors may also have been involved. Spartacus may have received news of Roman advances in Thrace that made him doubt that he and the other Thracians in his army could return home safely.

The Spartacus War Strauss Barry Simon & Schuster 9781416532057 : The Spartacus War is the extraordinary story of. .Starting with only seventy-four men, a gladiator named Spartacus incited a rebellion that threatened Rome itself

The Spartacus War Strauss Barry Simon & Schuster 9781416532057 : The Spartacus War is the extraordinary story of the most famous slave rebellion in the ancient world, the fascinating true stor. With his fellow gladiators, Spartacus built an army of 60,000 soldiers and controlled the southern Italian countryside. He defeated nine Roman armies and kept Rome at bay for two years before he was defeated.

  • Ok, to be completely honest---I absolutely love this book. I've already read it three times through and I have no doubt I'll keep reading it over again and again, and what's not to love about it? Whenever one mentions the name "Spartacus", the image of gladiators comes instantly to mind and usually a close second is the terrific Kirk Douglas movie (admit it---you just said to yourself "I am Spartacus!" didn't you?) or more recently, the outstanding Starz TV series by the same name. While the name and person of Spartacus has come down to us linked with the concepts of freedom and justice, just how accurate is that image?

    Dr. Barry Strauss takes us to a time and place long ago; one that may even seem vaguely familiar to us but strangely alien at the same time. It was a world of drastic dichotomies between the rich and poor; between the powerful and the weak; and between the free and the slave. Roman, though still a Republic much like ours, was nearing its end; soon to be faced with a series of internal civil wars resulting from an economic, political, and societial breakdown, and in its place, the Rise of the Dictator along with Imperial Rome. Slaves revolts weren't unique, but none had the organization, planning that this one had. None were able to raise an army of over 60,000 slaves and freemen, and none had the brillance of a chrismatic leader like Spartacus. Dr. Strauss' telling of the story is masterful, from the wonderful descriptions of the countryside to the mindset of the Rome's leading Senators and generals and that of the man himself, Spartacus and his generals like Crixus, Gannicus, or Oenomaus. We learn about the possible causes of the revolt; how they trained and survived while being chased by Rome's mightly legions and ultimately defeated by the epitome of Rome herself, Marcus Licinius Crassus and the great Pompey.

    I could literally go on and on about this book. Suffice it to say that this book is for anyone interested in history---ancient or military, the Roman Empire, political movements, slavery and ancient economies, or just likes a great adventure book. This book also offers something more. It offers a possible glimpse at ourselves. The Roman Republic was on the verge of collapsing for some of the very reasons now facing us, and social injustice was growing rapidly. What happens when the dispossed has had enough? In 1919 Germany for instance, social democrats embraced the name of Spartacus in their fight for democracy; a fight which failed and eventually made way for the rise of the Nazis. Nevertheless, the name of Spartacus continues to inflame the imagination of the poor and powerless and inspires fear in rich and powerful.

  • Spartacus. The very name is the stuff of legends. His slave rebellion against the Roman Empire in the first century BC has served as inspiration for countless dissenters and revolutionaries over the past two millennia. But who was he, really? In his 2009 book The Spartacus War, Barry Strauss attempts to shed some light on the age-old story of this gladiator, insurgent, and icon. Those familiar with the film and literary adaptations of this hero’s saga will find his true story every bit as fascinating and stirring as the fictional epics he inspired.

    Unfortunately, not many ancient accounts of the Spartacus uprising still exist, and most of those that are extant are second- or third-hand accounts. Strauss knows these original sources inside and out, and summarizes the available historical record clearly and concisely. Where gaps appear in the scanty narrative, he fills them in with contextual information and educated speculation. For example, we know very little about Spartacus’s wife, except that she was a priestess of the god Dionysius. Strauss describes the religious rituals of the Dionysius cult at this period of time and details what the life of such a prophetess might have been like. We know Spartacus was a gladiator, so there’s plenty of information in the book about the daily lives of gladiators and those who owned them. Strauss situates the Spartacus rebellion within a broader history of slave uprisings and rebellions faced by ancient Rome. The political and military careers of all the Roman generals who attempted to quell the rebellion are also examined in detail. If any first-hand blow-by-blow accounts were ever written of the battles fought between the rebels led by Spartacus and the forces of Rome, they have not survived the ages, but Strauss knows an awful lot about ancient warfare and makes the reader feel like he’s right there on the ground amidst the fighting, spattered with blood, sweat, and gore. Some scholars may complain that there’s too much imaginative license taken in The Spartacus War, but for general readers with an avid interest in the ancient world this is a gripping and informative read.

    The least interesting portions of Strauss’s study occur when he attempts to pin down the exact geographical location where an event took place. Unless you’re a scholar on the subject or intimately familiar with the regional topography, these passages are about as entertaining as reading an Italian road atlas. Beyond these occasional exceptions, however, the book is a smooth and lively read. It’s packed with information, but Strauss’s prose is always crisp, engaging, and accessible.

    In closing this review, I must confess that one of my guilty pleasures is the Spartacus TV series from Starz. Like-minded fans will be surprised to find out how closely the makers of that program stuck to the actual history of the Spartacus rebellion. Of course, Strauss’s take on the subject is far less sensationalized, but no less sensational. This book is definitely a must-read for anyone who’s ever admired Western history’s most illustrious freedom fighter.

  • Excellent book, and it should be a requirement for history classes in High School! The author knows his stuff! If you have seen the four season series "Spartacus" on Netflix, you can understand how this book gave the writers all they needed to know. The book details how Spartacus was a real life warrior and cerebral man. With just 60 or 70 slaves (Gladiators) to begin with, Spartacus and his crew escaped the then town of Capula, and boom, about 60,000 former Gladiators fought of evil, the Roman Empire for two years. Spartacus was indeed a real person, and his name should live on in eternity, because Spartacus represents true freedom! Fantastic book, I'm reading it a second time, taking detailed notes to write an extended review in my blog. This book should be a required read for all students of history, great book!

  • Barry Strauss is an amazing author. I love history, but some history books fail to bring you into the story, and just describe dates and events in a very dry, detached way. Not so here. As I am reading this book, I feel as though I am actually witnessing the events as he tells them. I can smell the dust, and feel the heat of Capua. I can hear the noises of the market, and observe the dense forests around Vesuvius. This to me, is how history should be taught and told. Give the reader a way to connect with the events, rather than just vomiting out facts. Great job Barry! I will be looking for more history books by him.