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ePub A Short History of Cambodia: From Empire to Survival (A Short History of Asia series) download

by John Tully

ePub A Short History of Cambodia: From Empire to Survival (A Short History of Asia series) download
Author:
John Tully
ISBN13:
978-1741147636
ISBN:
1741147638
Language:
Publisher:
Allen & Unwin; 1st edition (September 1, 2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Asia
ePub file:
1337 kb
Fb2 file:
1946 kb
Other formats:
doc mbr lit rtf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
369

In this concise and compelling history, Cambodia’s past is described in vivid detail, from the richness of the Angkorean empire through the dark ages of the 18th and . has been added to your Cart.

In this concise and compelling history, Cambodia’s past is described in vivid detail, from the richness of the Angkorean empire through the dark ages of the 18th and early-19th centuries.

A Short History of Cambodia: From Empire to Survival, (Sydney and Chiang Mai: Allen & Unwin and Silkworm, 2006). Forthcoming: Labor in Akron, Ohio,1825-1945(Akron,.

A Short History of Cambodia book. With energetic writing and passion for the subject, John Tully covers the full sweep of Cambodian history, explaining why this land of contrasts remains an interesting enigma to the international community. Detailing the depressing record of war, famine, and invasion that has threatened to destroy Cambodia, this discussion shows its survival to be a testament to the resilience of the human spirit.

Other books in the series Short History of Bali, Robert Pringle Short History of China and Southeast Asia, Martin Stuart-Fox Short History . Tully, John A. (John Andrew), A short history of Cambodia : from empire to survival.

Other books in the series Short History of Bali, Robert Pringle Short History of China and Southeast Asia, Martin Stuart-Fox Short History of Indonesia, Colin Brown Short History of Japan, Curtis Andressen Short History of Laos, Grant Evans Short History of Malaysia, Virginia Matheson Hooker.

This book traces the history of Cambodia from the Indian-influenced state of Funan, which predated Angkor (founded in 802), to the present: a grand sweep of over 2000 years. Also included is a brief discussion of the pre-history of what is today Cambodia in Chapter 2. The Cambodian monarchy is over 1200 years old; King Sihamoni, who sits on the throne today, is the latest incumbent in a line dating from the reign of King Jayavarman II, the shadowy founder of Angkor, the first unified polity of Cambodia. It is not an unbroken bloodline of kings, but was disrupted by usurpers on many occasions.

This is an excellent book. Part of this is due to the author's skill and part is due to the fact that Cambodia's history is quite dramatic, containing an abundance of tragedy, irony, and direction changes. It is extremely well-written and reads more like a novel rather than a history. The author does a great job of turning what could be boring facts into an interesting story. Download (pdf, . 6 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

With a depressing record of war famine and invasion that have all threatened to destroy it Cambodia's survival is a testament to the resilience of the human spirit. Death Is the Cool Night, (Melbourne: Papyrus Publishing, 1999)

A Short History of Cambodia : From Empire to Survival .

A Short History of Cambodia : From Empire to Survival. In this concise and compelling history, John Tully charts Cambodia's past from the richness of the Angkorean empire, through the dark ages of the 18th and early 19th centuries, the era of French colonialism, independence, the Vietnamese conflict, and the Pol Pot regime to its present day incarnation as a flawed democracy.

In this concise and compelling history, Cambodia’s past is described in vivid detail . A Short History of Asia series. Allen & Unwin Academic.

In this concise and compelling history, Cambodia’s past is described in vivid detail, from the richness of the Angkorean empire through the dark ages of the 18th and early-19th centuries, French colonialism, independence, the Vietnamese conflict, the Pol Pot regime, and its current incarnation as a troubled democracy.

In this concise and compelling history, Cambodia’s past is described in vivid detail, from the richness of the Angkorean empire through the dark ages of the 18th and early-19th centuries, French colonialism, independence, the Vietnamese conflict, the Pol Pot regime, and its current incarnation as a troubled democracy. With energetic writing and passion for the subject, John Tully covers the full sweep of Cambodian history, explaining why this land of contrasts remains an interesting enigma to the international community. Detailing the depressing record of war, famine, and invasion that has threatened to destroy Cambodia, this discussion shows its survival to be a testament to the resilience of the human spirit.
  • Well written, very informative, and provides a nicely balance of ancient and modern history. Perfect for reading a chapter a night. Contains lots of references for those who'd like to pursue additional sources. I bought it after doing a mountain-bike trip through the country, which I fell in love with. The book provided me just the amount of detail I was looking for.

  • Fascinating but sad, very sad, history, briskly written with some editorializing along the way. Quick, easy, near breezy read- for those that want to go beypnd thectravel guidebook. Some charts, etc. especially timelines would help put things into a perspective: a bit too much of ‘and then this happened” a concise history - what you want to read b4 getting3 into the tomes. Time for an update., tho.

  • This book was exactly what I was looking for to prepare for my first trip to Cambodia. It is very readable--accessible to a general audience--but informed by recent scholarship. While rightly focused on Cambodia, Tully provides just the right amount of regional context so that you understand the broader history of Southeast Asia--especially Thailand and Vietnam--in relation to Cambodia. While I am not an expert on Cambodia, it does seem to me that Tully knows exactly which details are essential for the general reader who mainly needs to get the big picture. Any given chapter might inspire the reader to look for more depth elsewhere. For example, as someone who had an image of Sihanouk shaped by the U.S. media of the 1960s, I found Tully's treatment of this complex man caused me to rethink much of what I thought I knew about him. I am now interested in reading something more in-depth on Sihanouk. Tully's coverage of the post-World War II is also very helpful for anyone interested in broadening their understanding of the significance of Southeast Asia in the Cold War apart from the U.S. War in Vietnam.

  • This was a very good read that expanded my knowledge of Cambodia's history and it's relationship with it's neighbouring countries. Once very powerful in the region, once wealthy but driven to it's knees in recent times. The impact of feudal and colonial administration is well described as is the effect of rampant corruption that Cambodians have been subject to. An interesting read for anyone who likes to know what happens in other parts of the world or is likely to visit the region for whatever reason.

  • Ok, but found the narrative a bit flat. Quite scholarly, refers to what the various scholars have to say re Cambodia, but dips into recitation rather than synthesis which I found a bit disappointing. Very solid work, just not for me the most engaging writing style-- although it does get a bit more engaging towards the end...

  • For those who know little about Cambodia other than the ruins of Angkor and the Killing Fields of the Khmer Rouges, this book provides a balanced introduction to the history of this troubled country and its long suffering people. The narrative is accessible to those interested in learning more without being lost in the often Byzantine intrigues which have dominated Cambodia's history. Naturally, it gives a more fulsome account of the 20th century as there is a wealth of historical documents and narratives to drW on in comparison to the shadowy pre-Angkor period. Overall, a great read and a testament to the unfortunate use of a country as a pawn in international power struggles and the devastation this has wreaked on its people.

  • This book educated me on the history, people, culture and hardships of being Cambodian. I felt that it accurately depicted the nation and its woes over the past 100 years and hoped that by the book's end there would be more positive things happening in that country but that is not the case and today we see the terrors of the most awful child abuse/sex slavery imaginable. Too often perpetrated by American men looking for sex with children.

  • The description of this book caught my eye because, having lived through the Vietnam War years at prime draft age, I realized I still knew very little about Cambodia or its history. I found the book fascinating at every turn, from learning about the amazing Khmer empire in ancient times to appreciating the tortuous path its leaders had to follow in the last hundred years just to survive as an independent state. The depth of knowledge and fairness in perspective of Mr. Tully made his observations and impressions compelling. At times the presentation was so academic in references to other historians that it was easy to feel excluded from certain debates. Still the overall impression was one of discovery and fascination with a little understood part of the world. Highly recommended to anyone interested in learning about the history and politics of Southeast Asia.