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by Paul Hill

ePub The Age of Athelstan: Britain's Forgotten History (Revealing History (Paperback)) download
Author:
Paul Hill
ISBN13:
978-0752425665
ISBN:
0752425668
Language:
Publisher:
Tempus; 1st edition (February 1, 2004)
Category:
Subcategory:
Europe
ePub file:
1711 kb
Fb2 file:
1515 kb
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
422

It's important for would be purchasers to realise that the author, Paul Hill, is writing about the AGE of Athelstan and not just about his life and reign.

It's important for would be purchasers to realise that the author, Paul Hill, is writing about the AGE of Athelstan and not just about his life and reign. In fact, the book covers most of the Tenth Century in Anglo-Saxon England. Although Athelstan was king for little more than 14 years, his achievements during that relatively short time were immense.

The Age of Athelstan: Britain's Forgotten History (Revealing History). The Age of Athelstan', is certainly a great history book. Published in 2004, Paul Hill is a modern English writer of the early English medievil period to rank alongside Wood and Swanton

The Age of Athelstan: Britain's Forgotten History (Revealing History). 0752425668 (ISBN13: 9780752425665). Published in 2004, Paul Hill is a modern English writer of the early English medievil period to rank alongside Wood and Swanton. The 'dark ages' read to me like Tolkien and I have long held a fascination for the Anglo Saxon period. So this work on Athelstan sits at the very peak of the age. However, to judge with dispassion 'The Age of Athelstan', is certainly a great history book.

Select Format: Paperback. In an age of evocative names like Eric Bloodaxe and Egil Skallagrimson, one name has been lost in the mists of time: that of Athelstan, ruler of all Britain. From the first raids of the Vikings on the shores of Britain and Ireland, the book traces the response to the threat across the Anglo-Saxon and Celtic worlds.

Book Format: Choose an option. King Athelstan (924–939) is one of history’s forgotten monarchs. Revealing History (Paperback). Paperback, Tempus Publishing, Limited, 2004, ISBN13 9780752425665, ISBN10 0752425668. Tell us if something is incorrect. A grandson of Alfred the Great, his achievements outshine many of our most famous kings-he began his reign as king of the Anglo-Saxons in the south of England, and ended as the self-styled king of all Britain.

King Athelstan (924–939) is one of history’s forgotten monarchs. During Athelstan’s reign there was a tremendous power struggle between the English, Scots, Norse, Irish, Danes, and Welsh, culminating in 937 in a battle the importance of which was not equalled until Hastings-the lost battle of Brunanburh.

The Age of Athelstan: Britain's Forgotten History (Revealing History (Paperback)) (Paperback). Read full description. See details and exclusions. The Age of Athelstan by Paul Hill (Paperback, 2004). Brand new: lowest price.

Paul Hill (Hill, Paul). used books, rare books and new books. The Age of Athelstan: Britain's Forgotten History (Revealing History (Paperback)): ISBN 9780752425665 (978-0-7524-2566-5) Softcover, Tempus, 2004. The Anglo-Saxons: The Verdict of History. Find all books by 'Paul Hill' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Paul Hill'. Abelian Group Theory and Related Topics: Conference on Abellan Groups August 1-7, 1993 Oberwolfach, Germany (Contemporary Mathematics). by Rudiger Gobel, Paul Hill. ISBN 9780752436043 (978-0-7524-3604-3) Softcover, Tempus, 2006.

The previous two volumes in this trilogy on the Anglo-Saxons are The Age of Athelstan: Britain's Forgotten History and The Road to Hastings: the Politics of Power in Anglo-Saxon England.

The Notting Hill race riots featured heavily in the film Absolute Beginners which was based on the book of the same name by. "Long history of race rioting".

The Notting Hill race riots featured heavily in the film Absolute Beginners which was based on the book of the same name by Colin MacInnes. After 44 years secret papers reveal truth about five nights of violence in Notting Hill". Retrieved 10 May 2016. Retrieved 27 April 2013. Olden, Mark (29 August 2008). White riot: The week Notting Hill exploded".

August 19, 2010 History. Age of athelstan: britain's forgotten history. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove AGE OF ATHELSTAN: BRITAIN'S FORGOTTEN HISTORY. from your list? Age of athelstan: britain's forgotten history. Published by TEMPUS in STROUD. Written in Undetermined.

King Athelstan (924–939) is one of history’s forgotten monarchs. A grandson of Alfred the Great, his achievements outshine many of our most famous kings—he began his reign as king of the Anglo-Saxons in the south of England, and ended as the self-styled king of all Britain. During Athelstan’s reign there was a tremendous power struggle between the English, Scots, Norse, Irish, Danes, and Welsh, culminating in 937 in a battle the importance of which was not equalled until Hastings—the lost battle of Brunanburh.
  • This book is a clear and well-written overview of Athelstan, the grandson of Alfred the Great and son of Edward the Elder, who completed what Alfred started - the unification of England up to that point. The title of the book is very accurate: The Age of Athelstan: Britain's Forgotten History. About half the book is taken up by Athelstan's predecessors (Alfred, Edward the Elder) and successors (Edmund through Aethelred). As such it is a clear and concise overview of the age of the Anglo-Saxon kings with Athelstan as the focus. The author, Paul Hill, does an excellent job with limited sources telling the story of Athelstan's reign. He keeps the reader engaged and one does get some sense of who Athelstan was as a person, even possibly what he physically looked like ("average height, of slim build, with flaxen hair"). Hill does a nice job balancing the legends with the data and the overall impression is of a man who was an intelligent leader, who knew how to deal with enemies given the requirements of the situation, and whose laws attempted to deal with the increase in commerce, especially in Alfred's "burhs" and at the expanding ports. A great deal of space is devoted to the Battle of Brunanburh, the critical battle for the control of northern England. The details in the book about Brunanburh are relevant both because the battle was important in English history and because it was largely forgotten. Much space is devoted to simply trying to figure out where it occurred. It is a mystery in many ways but Hill reconstructs from the scant and exaggerated sources what apparently happened.

    I recommend this book both for the lucid overview of Anglo-Saxon England and for the solid work the author does in reconstructing Athelstan's life. For anyone interested in English history, this book is definitely worth obtaining.

  • This book makes quite a lot of hype has been made about Athelstan, his times and “Britain’s forgotten history.” To some - and perhaps even to a large – extent, this is justified. I may even have been more justified some ten years ago when this book was first published, than it is nowadays, since Sarah Foot’s scholarly book on the same topic, which I found even better than this one. Nevertheless, this is a good book. It is indeed clear and well-written, but the case is not entirely convincing, and this shows to some extent in the author’s narrative.

    Rather than writing a biography of King Athelstan, of even a book on King Athelstan and his times, Paul Hill has in fact come up with a history of the unification of England by the West Saxon Kings, from Alfred through Aethelred. Half of the book is about (the first hundred pages or so) Athelstan’s predecessors and the last forty pages or so are about his successors so that in fact the reign of Athelstan himself only takes up about sixty pages or so, or some 30% of the total. There are several reasons for this.

    One reason, which the author acknowledges, is the limited sources. Another reason, however, which the author chooses not to emphasise, is that the reign of Athelstan can hardly be considered on its own and needs to be considered as part of a continuum from Alfred to Aethelred. A related point here is that Alfred – Athelstan’s grandfather – started the unification of what would become “England”. Perhaps to be more accurate and to avoid the risk of hindsight and “second-guessing” (to which Paul Hill seems sometimes prone in this book), he made sure that Wessex survived the Viking onslaught and started to turn back the Viking tide. It is not quite sure as to whether he really intended to unify the whole England under his authority and if so, under what form. One reason for this uncertainty is that “England” ever since the Angles, Saxons and Jutes had arrived, had been made up of multiple kingdoms which had never been united before.

    When compared to his grandfather, King Athelstan may appear to be “forgotten” to some extent, and one certainly does hear and learn much less about him. However, he is much better known than his warrior-father (Edward the Elder), despite the fact that it is Edward who conquered East Anglia and most of the Five Boroughs, and not Athelstan.

    Athelstan is in fact better remembered than his own father and most of his successors for several reasons.

    One is that, like his grandfather and like Edgar, he is remembered for what he did for the Church, and remembered in a favourable way thanks to the Church.

    Another major reason for Athelstan to be remembered is that he won the battle of Brunanburth against a coalition of his enemies. The author allows a lot of space to this battle, discusses it in detail and spends pages in making a case for the battle taking place on the East coast rather than the more commonly admitted West coast (not very far from Chester). However, he does not really underline what may be a much more important conclusion. By 937, Athelstan’s kingdom had become so strong that he was able to fight and destroy a coalition grouping just about all of his enemies at the same time, something that none of his predecessors were able to do because they had not yet the power to do so. This is not to diminish King Athelstan in any way. He certainly was a talented warlord, warrior and sovereign. So was his father and, perhaps more importantly, so were the Lord and Lady of Mercia (his aunt), that is those who had taken care of his upbringing and education.

    A third reason is the emphasis he put on his sovereignty, rather than what the author terms his “self-styled basilius” (or rather basileus) and the way he allegedly portrayed himself as “an emperor.” In addition, the author also sees him as the first true King of the English, if not of the whole of England, where his predecessors only had this aspiration. Here also, Paul Hill seems to have perhaps exaggerated and over-interpreted a bit. Rather than an Emperor in the initial Carolingian sense, he seems to have been a powerful over-lord who imposed his domination on the other kings in the island, including the Welsh and Scots. Moreover, the future Kingdom of the English was far from unified when he died, as the author shows, however reluctantly, when discussing the reigns of his successors. They would be numerous revolts, and not only in the Danelaw and it would be in fact under Edgar that the Kingdom would really become unified.

    Finally, there are yet two more reasons for King Athelstan’s good press and it goes under what we would nowadays call his “economic policy” and laws, and his diplomacy. Here again, he was following precedents to some extent and amplifying them. Again, this is something that the author discusses quite a bit, mentioning in particular the increase in commerce and expanding burgh and ports, and his active diplomacy through the marriage of his sisters abroad and his fostering of the heir to the Carolingian Empire. What is not discussed, however, is the impact that this economic expansion and prosperity, which would continue under the next reigns and was largely due to trade with the Continent (and with Germany in particular), had on the military organisation and the burgh system in particular, that had served both his grandfather and father so well when the Saxons were fighting for survival.

    To conclude, it is perhaps a bit of an exaggeration to claim that “the age of Athelstan” is “forgotten”, for the reasons mentioned above. Nevertheless, I certainly recommend this very interesting book, although the reader will need to take some of the author’s assertions with a “pinch of salt”. Moreover, rather than recommending it as a reconstruction of “Athelstan life and times”, I would rather recommend it for its evolving overview of Anglo-Saxon England from Alfred to Aethelred the Ill-Advised. Four stars.

    For those wanting to read more on some of Alfred’s successors, I can also recommend, in addition to Sarah Foot’s book on Athelstan, the two following ones:
    - Edward the Elder, a collection of some 22 scholarly studies on various aspects of his reign (edited by N. Higham and D. Hill, 2001)
    - Edgar, King of the English by Peter Rex. Note that there is also a recent collection of studies on King Edgar.

  • In an age of evocative names like Eric Bloodaxe and Egil Skallagrimson, one name has been lost in the mists of time: that of Athelstan, ruler of all Britian. From the first raids of the Vikings on the shores of Britian and Ireland, the book traces the response to the threat across the Anglo-Saxon and Celtic worlds. The rise of the kingdom of the Anglo-Saxons, and later of the English, built from the debris of Viking destruction, is analysed in detail and compared to the struggle for independence in Northumbria.

    Athelstan's achievement in establishing an empire for which he became famous is a key focus of the tale, along with the extradornary history of the hunt for the lost battle of Brunanburh (AD 937), a clash which defined a people. For hundreds of years, no king would rule as much of Britian as Athelstan. His reputation survived the medieval period in the form of histories, songs and poems only to be lost at a later date, and yet its essence can still be found today all over the country.

    Paul Hill was formerly curator at Kingston Museum where Athelstan was crowned. He has appeared on Britian's Channel 5's Battlefield Detectives series in 'Bloodbath at Hastings" as an Anglo-Saxon military specalist.

    Recommended!