mostraligabue
» » Thunder at Twilight: Vienna, 1913-1914

ePub Thunder at Twilight: Vienna, 1913-1914 download

by Frederic Morton

ePub Thunder at Twilight: Vienna, 1913-1914 download
Author:
Frederic Morton
ISBN13:
978-0720608090
ISBN:
0720608090
Language:
Publisher:
Peter Owen Ltd (1991)
Category:
Subcategory:
Europe
ePub file:
1343 kb
Fb2 file:
1401 kb
Other formats:
lrf rtf mbr txt
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
479

Fritz Mandelbaum became Frederic Morton. But since much of this book is set in Vienna, it is also an exploration of history backstage.

Fritz Mandelbaum became Frederic Morton. In a way this book is a memorial to the first Fritz Mandelbaum-my uncle-and to the more than ten million who died with him in the Great War. The baroque died in Vienna with flamboyant afterquivers while at the same time some peculiar force here generated energies that would shake the new century. Here were streets uniquely charged with both nostalgia and prophecy. Three of my recent books have tried to penetrate the phenomenon.

As times changed prior to 1913 the heavy handed suppression of Serbian nationalism persisted-the only important voice of dissent was Crown Prince Ferdinand

Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). As times changed prior to 1913 the heavy handed suppression of Serbian nationalism persisted-the only important voice of dissent was Crown Prince Ferdinand. It was his desire to accommodate Serbia's demands for cultural and political freedom. His visit to Serbia was intended to tilt Austrian-Serb relations toward peace, friendship and accommodation.

Thunder At Twilight: Vienna 19131914 Frederic Morton Thunder at Twilight is a landmark of historical vision, drawing on hitherto untapped sources to illuminate two crucial years in the life. Thunder At Twilight: Vienna 1913/1914. Thunder at Twilight is a landmark of historical vision, drawing on hitherto untapped sources to illuminate two crucial years in the life of the extraordinary city of Vienna - and in the life of the twentieth century. It was during the carnival of 1913 that a young Stalin arrived on a mission that would launch him into the upper echelon of Russian revolutionaries, and it was here that he first collided with Trotsky.

World War, 1914-1918. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. t on November 11, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Thunder At Twilight: Vienna 1913/1914. Author: Frederic Morton. It was in Vienna that the failed artist Adolf Hitler kept daubing watercolors and spouting tirades at fellow drifters in a flophouse.

Frederic Morton (October 5, 1924 – April 20, 2015) was an Austrian-born American writer. Born Fritz Mandelbaum in Vienna, Morton was the son of a blacksmith who specialized in forging (manufacturing) imperial medals

Frederic Morton (October 5, 1924 – April 20, 2015) was an Austrian-born American writer. Born Fritz Mandelbaum in Vienna, Morton was the son of a blacksmith who specialized in forging (manufacturing) imperial medals. In the wake of the Anschluss of 1938, his father was arrested, but later released. Both books are incredibly similar. They deal with two years out of the lives of promi "Thunder At Twilight" is not the only book Frederic Morton has written about Vienna. 0306810212 (ISBN13: 9780306810213). The other book, "A Nervous Splendor", preceded this book, and deals with the years 1888/1889. In many ways, this book is a continuation of "A Nervous Splendor", so for completeness sake, I would definitely recommend "A Nervous Splendor" as well, but "Thunder At Twilight" can easily be read as a stand-alone book, too.

Thunder at Twilight is a landmark of historical vision, drawing on hitherto untapped sources to illuminate two crucial years in the life of the extraordinary city of Vienna - and in the life of the twentieth century

Thunder at Twilight is a landmark of historical vision, drawing on hitherto untapped sources to illuminate two crucial years in the life of the extraordinary city of Vienna - and in the life of the twentieth century.

Электронная книга "Thunder at Twilight: Vienna 1913/1914", Frederic Morton. With luminous prose that has twice made him a finalist for the National Book Award, Frederic Morton evokes the opulent, elegant, incomparable sunset metropolis-Vienna on the brink of cataclysm. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Thunder at Twilight: Vienna 1913/1914" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Frederic Morton was born in Vienna and lives in New York City.

item 2 Morton, Frederic, Thunder at Twilight: Vienna 1913-1914, Like New, Paperback -Morton, Frederic . Frederic Morton was born in Vienna and lives in New York. As both novelist and historian, he has twice been nominated for the National Book Award. Country of Publication.

item 2 Morton, Frederic, Thunder at Twilight: Vienna 1913-1914, Like New, Paperback -Morton, Frederic, Thunder at Twilight: Vienna 1913-1914, Like New, Paperback. item 3 Thunder at Twilight: Vienna 1913-1914, Morton, Frederic, Like New, Paperback -Thunder at Twilight: Vienna 1913-1914, Morton, Frederic, Like New, Paperback.

Thunder at Twilight is a landmark of historical vision, drawing on hitherto untapped sources to illuminate two crucial years in the life of the extraordinary city of Vienna—and in the life of the twentieth century. It was during the carnival of 1913 that a young Stalin arrived on a mission that would launch him into the upper echelon of Russian revolutionaries, and it was here that he first collided with Trotsky. It was in Vienna that the failed artist Adolf Hitler kept daubing watercolors and spouting tirades at fellow drifters in a flophouse. Here Archduke Franz Ferdinand had a troubled audience with Emperor Franz Joseph—and soon the bullet that killed the archduke would set off the Great War that would kill ten million more. With luminous prose that has twice made him a finalist for the National Book Award, Frederic Morton evokes the opulent, elegant, incomparable sunset metropolis—Vienna on the brink of cataclysm.
  • A closely researched, generally well written account of the end of the Habsburg empire centered on its capital Vienna, and the genesis of WWI. His thesis, which is reasonably well supported, is that this comic-opera empire lived in the dream of a world which no longer existed. Many well-known, and some lesser figures, are painted, including the usual suspects: Franz Josef the aged conservative Emperor attempting to deny the changing world, his irascible nephew and heir Franz Ferdinand (whose personality leads one to wonder "what if" he had survived the assassination attempt), Freud, Hitler, Trotsky, etc. The culture of Vienna is wonderfully depicted, and the many cafe scenes make you hungry as well as resorting to Google to find out what things like "Mohr im Hemd" are made of and taste like.

    I am not sure that I agree with his conclusion that war came because "the people" (whoever they are) wanted it. Yes, as we know only too well, it is too easy to be drawn into war as an easy solution to complex problems. But going to war takes more than popular longings.

    My only quibble with the book is Morton's love for obscure words, such as "gonfalon," which leads him sometimes into passages rather more purple than effective. But aside from that, this book illuminates a period and provides useful and interesting information on a period which had seemed to be buried in books, and makes an excellent companion (prequel if you like) to Tuchman's "The Guns of August."

    It also provides a cautionary tale relevant to today, when the same kinds of fissures exist between the powerful rich and the rest of us, when many of the same ethnic hatreds are still roiling nations, and when the same kinds of technological advances are creating uncertainty and distress.

  • It is now commonplace to recognize that the seeds of WW-II were well planted in the German economic crisis following the treaty of Versailles. What is generally less recognized is the role played by the government of Franz Josef in what WW-I might be called an accidental explosion. The events that occurred during the interval 1880-1914 are well covered in the two Morton volumes of popular history, "Thunder at Twilight" and "A Nervous Splendor." These volumes are in accord with academic histories of the Hapsburg Empire in a way that makes understandable (sometimes entertaining) the Wienergeist of cultural and political currents that triggered WW-I

    Mr. Morton makes vivid that the body, the practice and the outlook of Franz Josef were glacially rigid, not up to the effective development of the many small emergent components of his empire. It is true that Mr. Morton does not set his narrative in the period beginning with the Vienna Conference of 1815, but his starting point in these volumes was well chosen: the suicides of Crown Prince Rudolf and Mary Vetsera. Rudolf was a forward looking modernist whose views were offensive to Franz Joesef. Mr. Morton makes vivid the relationships and the events that embodied the structural weaknesses of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and while doing this, he flavors the narrative with interesting descriptions of Wienerkultur.,

    One of the persistent problems for the Austrians was the control of Serbia, one of the empire's entijties that the Austrians were unable to control--a hotbed of revolutionary activity. As times changed prior to 1913 the heavy handed suppression of Serbian nationalism persisted-the only important voice of dissent was Crown Prince Ferdinand. It was his desire to accommodate Serbia's demands for cultural and political freedom. His visit to Serbia was intended to tilt Austrian-Serb relations toward peace, friendship and accommodation. Too bad-the revolutionaries shot the wrong guy.

    Along the way, Morton presents vivid pictures of Wienerkultur and Wienerpolotik. All of the European threads of revolution are present in Vienna. He makes the names Luger, Lennin, Trotsky, Stalin, Freud, Adler come alive. Vienna was, prior to WW-I, the world center of music, art, science, intrigue. Cafe Central was at the core. The royal family was rigid, ceremonial and loved enormous funerals. Morton weaves it all together into these two beautifully written volumes. Read them both. Having done that, the reader will be well equipped to explore histories more detailed and ponderous and, I think, will have a better understanding of the corruptions of European royal family politics. These families-idiots, all of them.