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ePub Food for War: Agriculture and Rearmament in Britain before the Second World War download

by Alan F. Wilt

ePub Food for War: Agriculture and Rearmament in Britain before the Second World War download
Author:
Alan F. Wilt
ISBN13:
978-0198208716
ISBN:
0198208715
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (November 15, 2001)
Category:
Subcategory:
Europe
ePub file:
1499 kb
Fb2 file:
1740 kb
Other formats:
doc mbr lit txt
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
520

Moreover, the relationship between food, agriculture, and rearmament should be analysed as important in its .

Moreover, the relationship between food, agriculture, and rearmament should be analysed as important in its own right because it provides additional insights into the decade. 8 Histories that have concentrated on the s do somewhat better than the general works.

Food for War is a ground-breaking study of Britain's food and agricultural preparations in the 1930s as the . The story of the interrelationships among food, agriculture, and rearmament in 1930s Britain is indeed enlightening

The story of the interrelationships among food, agriculture, and rearmament in 1930s Britain is indeed enlightening. Though dominated by military considerations, it is a broader story that exhibits political, economic, and social overtones as well.

This groundbreaking study charts Britain's food and agricultural preparations in the 1930s. It shows that in this sector, in contrast to other areas of the economy, government plans were already well-developed by 1939 and examines how the measures of the 1930s not only set the stage for World War II but also contributed to a more robust British agiculture in the decades th This groundbreaking study charts Britain's food and agricultural preparations.

To assess policy alternatives in agriculture and food in the UK after Brexit.

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001. vi + 262 pp. Index, notes, bibliography. Food for War: Agriculture and Rearmament in Britain before the Second World War. ByWiltAlan . .Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001. To assess policy alternatives in agriculture and food in the UK after Brexit. This arises from my role as chair of the Brexit working party of the Farmer-Scientist Network of the Yorkshire Agricult ural Society.

Mobile version (beta). Alan F. Wilt. Download (pdf, . 5 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Food for War is a ground-breaking study of Britain's food and agricultural preparations in the 1930s as the nation .

69 Alan F. Wilt, Food for War: Agriculture and Rearmament in Britain before the Second World War (Oxford: Oxford University . 71 Hammond, Food and Agriculture in Britain, 183. 72 Hardyment, Slice of Life, 11. Wilt, Food for War: Agriculture and Rearmament in Britain before the Second World War (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001), 252. 70 Ibid. 227. 73 Wilt, Food for War, 228. 74 ka, Austerity in Britain, 63. percent of men and thirty-one percent of women polled in 1943 believed that there was not even enough food to keep fit. 75 The lack of food was matched, unfortunately for the Englishman, by a lack of flavor in the basal diet.

Second World War (content). WILT, ALAN F. (Author) Oxford University Press (Publisher). Over two million American servicemen passed through Britain during the Second World War. In 1944, at the height of activity, up to half a million were based there with the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF). Their job was to man and maintain the vast fleets of aircraft needed to attack German cities and industry.

Volume 76 Issue 4: entrepreneurs, regulation, and technological in.

This groundbreaking study charts Britain's food and agricultural preparations in the 1930s. It shows that in this sector, in contrast to other areas of the economy, government plans were already well-developed by 1939 and examines how the measures of the 1930s not only set the stage for World War II but also contributed to a more robust British agiculture in the decades that followed.