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ePub The Victorian World Picture: Perceptions and Introspections in an Age of Change. download

by David Newsome

ePub The Victorian World Picture: Perceptions and Introspections in an Age of Change. download
Author:
David Newsome
ISBN13:
978-0006863601
ISBN:
0006863604
Language:
Publisher:
Fontana; New ED edition (1998)
Category:
Subcategory:
Europe
ePub file:
1245 kb
Fb2 file:
1188 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
449

David Newsome is a renowned social historian of the period and a biographer. This book is an excellent read

David Newsome is a renowned social historian of the period and a biographer. His previous books include On the Edge of Paradise, which won the Whitbread Prize for biography, The Parting of Friends, and The Convert Cardinals. This book is an excellent read. From what I have read so far, it is a lot about what life was like for the Victorians, how the Victorians looked at their time, what their interests and activities were, how life changed during the period, as well as having some on the politics and economics of the time. It has a chapter on Victorian historiography.

The Victorian world picture. perceptions and introspections in an age of change. The Victorian world picture. Published 1997 by J. Murray in London.

The Victorian World Picture : Perceptions and Introspections in an Age of Change. When did the Victorians come to regard themselves as "Victorians" and to use that term to describe the period in which they were living? David Newsome's monumental history takes a good, long look at the Victorian age and what distinguishes it so prominently in the history of both England and the world.

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In the first place, the Victorian age is defined by constant change and the Victorians’ awareness of it, which they . David Newsome, The Victorian World Picture, Perceptions and Introspections in an Age of Change (London: John Murray, 1997) 261-62

In the first place, the Victorian age is defined by constant change and the Victorians’ awareness of it, which they perceived as the inescapable condition of life in the modern world. There was the general sense of a society in transition to less hopeful destinations . New views of the world occurred, such as Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species (1859) which. found application to Hardy’s The Mayor of Casterbridge (cf. Gilmour 3; Newsome 8, 260). David Newsome, The Victorian World Picture, Perceptions and Introspections in an Age of Change (London: John Murray, 1997) 261-62.

The Victorian World Picture:94 Perceptions and Introspections in an Age of Change Morrison, Elizabeth. Trev Broughton and Ruth Symes (eds). The209 Governess: An Anthology Skabamicki, Anne. Remlnscences200 Sturrock, June. Eve's Renegades: Victorian97 Anti-Feminist Women Novelists VanArsdel, Rosemary T. Barbara Penny Kanner. Women in Context:196 Two Hundred Years ofBritish Women Biographers, a Reference Guide and Reader. You are not currently authenticated.

January 1999 · Victorian Studies. Victorian Studies 4. (2000) 330-332 Is it possible, any longer, to write of a Victorian "age," or of an "age of improvement," let alone attempt a "portrait" ? David Newsome anticipates the problems inherent in his synthetic project when he concedes, early on, that "there are as many world pictures as there are people who seek a meaning in the events around them," and speaks of the "inescapable.

David Newsome, The Victorian World Picture: Perceptions and Introspections in an Age of Change (John Murray, 1997) . David Lindsay, A Voyage to Arcturus ( Edinburgh: Canongate, 1992 ), p. 27. oogle Scholar.

David Newsome, The Victorian World Picture: Perceptions and Introspections in an Age of Change (John Murray, 1997), pp. 177–90. 12. Richard Adams, introduction to Walter de la Mare, The Three Royal Monkeys (Robin Clark, 1993), pp. v-vi. 13. 18. Mervyn Peake, Introduction to Drawings by Mervyn Peake (Grey Walls Press, 1949), repr. in Peaké s Progress: Selected Writings and Drawings by Mervyn Peake, ed.

The Victorian World Picture: Perceptions and Introspections in an Age of Change. David Newsome's monumental history, The Victorian World Picture, takes a good, long look at the Victorian age and what distinguishes it so prominently in the history of both England and the world.

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  • I am not finished with the book but will review it now in case it helps anyone. I will update my review when I'm done. This book is an excellent read. From what I have read so far, it is a lot about what life was like for the Victorians, how the Victorians looked at their time, what their interests and activities were, how life changed during the period, as well as having some on the politics and economics of the time. It has a chapter on Victorian historiography. It is well written, flows very well, has a good style, is informative but does not bore you at all with a ton of facts about politics, which is how I view some other history writing to be. It is a history of Victorian society and some aspects of Victorian thought in a manner very appropriate for the general reader.

    Edit: I updated this review twice as I was progressing through the book and then finally finished it but Amazon lost the second update. I don't remember everything I said, just that there was also a chapter on the state of religion in Victorian society and the last chapter before the conclusion was on how things were changing at the end of the Victorian era.

  • Newsome presents a highly readable overview of, as his subtitle puts it, Victorian "Perceptions and Introspections." The emphasis is on Victorian thought, as may be seen by the number of literary quotes that open chapters and dot the text. Those looking for a quick overview of Victorian life might be daunted by the thematic, rather than chronological, structure. Chapters, given broad amorphous titles like "Looking Inwards" and "Looking Beyond," range along the length of Victoria's reign in pursuit of the given theme. As no chronology is provided, some may find it hard to piece together all that was going on in a given time frame. What this book does do is provide a broad picture of the preoccupations, controversies and concerns of 19th century British thinkers, skillfully weaving in everything from Queen Victoria's letters to the ditties of Gilbert and Sullivan. Somewhat of an old-fashioned history (it reminded me of Walter Houghton's The Victorian Frame of Mind from the '50s), but well-crafted and pleasant to read.