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ePub A Green and Pleasant Land: How England’s Gardeners Fought the Second World War download

by Ursula Buchan

ePub A Green and Pleasant Land: How England’s Gardeners Fought the Second World War download
Author:
Ursula Buchan
ISBN13:
978-0091944155
ISBN:
0091944155
Language:
Publisher:
Random House UK (March 1, 2013)
Category:
Subcategory:
Europe
ePub file:
1381 kb
Fb2 file:
1330 kb
Other formats:
rtf mobi txt doc
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
815

A Green and Pleasant Land book.

A Green and Pleasant Land book. As the Second World War began in earnest and a whole nation listened to wireless broadcasts, dug holes for Anderson shelters, counted their coupons and made do and mended, so too were they instructed to 'Dig for Victory'. Ordinary people, as well as gardening experts, rose to the challenge: gardens, scrubland, allotments and even public parks were soon helping to feed a nation deprived of fresh produce.

Families were encouraged to dig up beloved roses in favour of patriotic cabbage and potatoes. The newly formed "land girls" took the place of farm boys, while the Women's Institute collected medicinal plants and turned gluts of plums into jam to succour a nation desperate for sugar (no one, it seems, was much impressed by carrot lollies).

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In a celebrated World War II speech, Winston Churchill talked about fighting the Germans on beaches, in fields and in the streets . We will fight them on the cabbage patch

In a celebrated World War II speech, Winston Churchill talked about fighting the Germans on beaches, in fields and in the streets; one place he didn’t mention was back gardens, writes JOHN HARDING. We will fight them on the cabbage patch. A GREEN AND PLEASANT LAND: HOW ENGLAND'S GARDENERS FOUGHT THE SECOND WORLD WAR BY URSULA BUCHAN (Hutchinson £20).

As the Second World War began in earnest and a whole nation listened to wireless broadcasts, dug holes for Anderson .

As the Second World War began in earnest and a whole nation listened to wireless broadcasts, dug holes for Anderson shelters, counted their coupons and made do and mended, so too were they instructed to ‘Dig for Victory’. The wonderfully evocative story of how Britain’s World War Two gardeners – with great ingenuity, invincible good humour and extraordinary fortitude – dug for victory on home turf.

In A Green and Pleasant Land, Ursula Buchan tells the intriguing and inspiring story of how the British government encouraged and . A Green and Pleasant Land. How England’s Gardeners Fought the Second World War. Ursula Buchan.

In A Green and Pleasant Land, Ursula Buchan tells the intriguing and inspiring story of how the British government encouraged and cajoled its citizens to contribute to the war effort by growing their own fruit and vegetables. As a whole nation listened to wireless broadcasts, dug holes for Anderson shelters, counted their coupons and made do and mended, so too were they instructed to ‘Dig for Victory’.

A Green and Pleasant Land is elegantly written and rich with horticultural vignettes: potatoes being tended next to the .

A Green and Pleasant Land is elegantly written and rich with horticultural vignettes: potatoes being tended next to the runway at Manchester parachute base; vegetables growing on bomb-sites in Bethnal Green; tomatoes in pots outside gentlemen’s clubs in London; 793 packets of seeds being sent to prisoners and internees in Germany, Italy and France; the undergraduates of Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford .

As the Second World War began in earnest and a whole nation listened to wireless broadcasts, dug holes for Anderson shelters, counted their coupons and made do and mended, so too were they instructed to & for Victory'.

Land: How England’s Gardeners Fought the New Paperback Book. Gardening in wartime Britain was a part of the fight for freedom.

item 2 A Green and Pleasant Land: How England’s Gardeners Fought the New Paperback Book -A Green and Pleasant Land: How England’s Gardeners Fought the New Paperback Book. item 7 A Green and Pleasant Land: How Englands Gardeners Fought the Second World War, B -A Green and Pleasant Land: How Englands Gardeners Fought the Second World War, B. £. 3. This book tells the story of how Britain's wartime government encouraged and cajoled its citizens to grow their own fruit and vegetables.

book by Ursula Buchan. Winston Churchill A Green and Pleasant Land tells the intriguing and inspiring story of how Britain's wartime government encouraged and cajoled its citizens to grow their own fruits and vegetables.

"War is the normal occupation of man—war and gardening."  —Winston Churchill

A Green and Pleasant Land tells the intriguing and inspiring story of how Britain's wartime government encouraged and cajoled its citizens to grow their own fruits and vegetables. As World War II began in earnest and a whole nation listened to wireless broadcasts, dug holes for Anderson shelters, counted their coupons, and made do and mended, so too were they instructed to "Dig for Victory." Ordinary people, as well as gardening experts, rose to the challenge: gardens, scrubland, allotments, and even public parks were soon helping to feed a nation deprived of fresh produce. As Ursula Buchan reveals, this practical contribution to the home front was tackled with thrifty ingenuity, grumbling humor, and extraordinary fortitude. The simple act of turning over soil and tending new plants became important psychologically for a population under constant threat of bombing and even invasion. Gardening reminded people that their country and its more innocent and insular pursuits were worth fighting for. Gardening in wartime Britain was a part of the fight for freedom.

  • This is a fascinating look at the challenge the British faced in providing food for themselves during the Second World War, when imports of food were severely restricted due to German patrols and sinking if provision laden ships. There are many thought provoking parallels to today, with many cities and cultures lacking in sources of nutritious food. There are lessons to be learned also about educating the public about nutrition and how to co operate in providing at least some home grown food for themselves. Thoroughly enjoyable to read.

  • Not only does this book portray the steeliness, courage and discipline of a people under attack; it also is very inspirational for all home gardeners.

  • Interesting read: she made sure everyone got credit for their contributions.
    The efforts to provide food for the whole population required an enormous
    mutual effort.

    This is a lesson in how interdependent the world had become by the 1930's.
    I hadn't realized that many countries were not self sufficient by then.

  • Lots of interesting history. It helps you appreciate the sacrifices these people made during WW II.

  • As a WWII child I clearly remember the Dig for Victory hype and as far as I can see the programme increased people's interest in growing vegetables for home consumption which hasn't really diminished over the years. This book explores all aspects of the concept.

  • Fascinating look into the war years and so many interesting tidbits about the evolution of things I grew up with like Rose Hip Syrup and Ribena. A thoroughly enjoyable and enlightening read.

  • Interesting history of the land girls

  • I read quite a bit of non-fiction. Loving England, and being a gardener I was very excited for this book.

    I definitely learned a lot, but feel the delivery could have been better. It was well organized (by topic, then chronologically) but I feel that this may have detracted from the flow of the book. The author seems to just get going on a topic for a paragraph or two when it must be abandoned to jump to the next, only semi-related, item of historical value solely because it happened to be next chronologically.