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ePub The Hell-Fire Clubs: A History of Anti-Morality download

by Geoffrey Ashe

ePub The Hell-Fire Clubs: A History of Anti-Morality download
Author:
Geoffrey Ashe
ISBN13:
978-0750924023
ISBN:
0750924020
Language:
Publisher:
The History Press; Revised edition (March 1, 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Europe
ePub file:
1616 kb
Fb2 file:
1715 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
471

The hell-fire clubs: sex, rakes and libertines by Geoffrey Ashe is the same book as The Hell-Fire Clubs: A. .This academic treatment gives a solid and documented history of the ideas and people behind the Hell Fire movement

The hell-fire clubs: sex, rakes and libertines by Geoffrey Ashe is the same book as The Hell-Fire Clubs: A History of Anti-Morality. by Geoffrey Ashe and do as though wilt a history of antimorality. I bought the same book three times due to the change of cover and book title. This academic treatment gives a solid and documented history of the ideas and people behind the Hell Fire movement.

Vi, 250 pages ; 22 cm. "The Hell-Fire Clubs are legendary. From this maverick group flow such notable literary libertines as Horace Walpole and Lord Byron.

The Hell-Fire Clubs book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Hell-Fire Clubs: A History of Anti-Morality as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

A number of Hellfire Clubs are still in existence in Ireland and are centred around universities . The Hell-Fire Clubs: A History of Anti-Morality. Gloucestershire: Sutton Publishing.

A number of Hellfire Clubs are still in existence in Ireland and are centred around universities and meet secretly. In the Marvel Comics comic book series The X-Men, the Hellfire Club (1980) is an ancient club for the rich and hedonistic with Regency Era trappings that has branches all over the world, concealing the 'Inner Circle', a powerful and influential criminal organisation, that has played a prominent role in various story lines since its introduction during The Dark Phoenix. Hunter S. Thompson in the 1988 collection of columns Generation of Swine.

Items related to The Hell-Fire Clubs: A History of Anti-Morality . Ashe, Geoffrey The Hell-Fire Clubs: A History of Anti-Morality. ISBN 13: 9780750924023. While all this is true, it is not the whole story.

If you wish to learn more about the Dublin Hellfire Club members, and eighteenth century Ireland here are some recommended books: Geoffrey Ashe, 2000. James Kelly & Martin Powell (eds). Clubs and Societies in Eighteenth-Century Ireland (Four Courts Press). Sex, Satanism and Secret Societies (Yale University Press).

The Hell-Fire Clubs, A History of Anti-Morality, Geoffrey Ashe. Gloucestershire : Sutton Publishing Limited, 2000 ISBN: 0 0 250p The Hellfire Club, Donald McCormack

The Hell-Fire Clubs, A History of Anti-Morality, Geoffrey Ashe. Gloucestershire : Sutton Publishing Limited, 2000 ISBN: 0 0 250p The Hellfire Club, Donald McCormack. Jarrolds, 1958 The Hell Fire club, Daniel P. Mannix. New York : Ballantine Books In. 1960 pb 186p. The Hell-Fire Friars,Gerald Suster. London : Robson Books, 2000. The lives of the Rakes: Volume IV, The Hell Fire Club, E. Beresford Chancellor . London : Philip Allan & Co. Quality Court, 1925.

The Hell-Fire Clubs : A History of Anti-Morality.

Hell-fire clubs have always been shrouded in rumours of devil worship and dark satanic deeds. Her interest was sparked when she came upon a copy of Geoffrey Ashe's Hell-Fire Clubs: A History of Anti-Morality in a second hand bookshop. How do you separate fact from fiction? Drive out of south Dublin and climb Mountpelier Hill and there, on top, squats the shell of the old hunting lodge built for Irish Parliamentary Speaker William Connolly in 1725. The spark lit a fire. The clubs appeared in waves, first in London in the 1720s, then in Dublin and Limerick in the 1740s and then the Dashwood club of the 1750s, she said.

The Hell-Fire Clubs conjure up images of aristocratic rakes outraging respectability at every turn, cutting a swath through the village maidens and celebrating Black Masses. While all this is true, it is not the whole story. The author of this volume has assembled an account of the Clubs and of their antecedents and descendants. At the centre of the book is the principal brotherhood, known by the Hell-Fire name - Sir Francis Dashwood's notorious Monks of Medmenham, with their strange rituals and initiation rites, library of erotica and nun companions recruited from the brothels of London. From this maverick group flow such notable literary libertines as Horace Walpole and Lord Byron. Pre-dating Medmenham are the figures of Rabelais and John Dee, both expounding philosophies of "do what you will" or "anything goes". Geoffrey Ashe traces the influence of libertarian philosphies on the world of the Enlightenment, showing how they met the need for a secular morality at a time when Christianity faced the onslaught of rationalism and empiricism. He follows the libertarian tradition through de Sade and into the 20th century, with discussions of Aleister Crowley, Charles Manson and Timothy Leary, delving below the scandals to reveal the social and political impact of "doing your own thing" which has roots far deeper than the post-war permissive society.
  • The hell-fire clubs: sex, rakes and libertines by Geoffrey Ashe is the same book as The Hell-Fire Clubs: A History of Anti-Morality...by Geoffrey Ashe and do as though wilt a history of antimorality. I bought the same book three times due to the change of cover and book title.

  • In Rabelais' work Gargantua (which sadly, I have not yet read, but just ordered after reading this) , there is a section in which the author imagines a Utopian "abbey" named Theleme; the only rule of living there is "Do what you will." Ashe looks at this rule, and asks the question of what happened when people have tried living by this motto, both in reality and in fiction. Furthermore, he examines the question of libertinism being the same as liberty -- and the result is a look through a slice of history. I will tell you at the outset that this is not a book for the average reader, and it's not a titillating tell-all about the much misconstrued and notorious Hellfire Clubs.

    Ashe takes the theme of Theleme through the book, looking into various individuals & organizations who have practiced the "do what you will" theme. Taking a road that leads from Rabelais, he examines John Dee and his assistant Edward Kelley, then moves to different erotic literature characters (and authors) of the 18th century, then the various Hell-fire Clubs, spending quite a bit of time with the one organized by Sir Francis Dashwood. His examination takes him into the world of politics, since most the highest-ranking members of this group were also members of government. Then it's on to Gothic literature, the Marquis de Sade, Lord Byron, Aleister Crowley, Anton LaVey (founder of the Church of Satan) and a wee bit about the "family" of Charles Manson.

    Very well done, but it is important to realize that this is a book of history and as such, not something that a reader wants to choose lightly. It takes a while to get through it, but it is well worth it. I'd recommend it to anyone seriously interested in the topic, and anyone who is looking for a resource on the subject.

  • This academic treatment gives a solid and documented history of the ideas and people behind the Hell Fire movement. Well researched and written, this work rises above the waft of conspiracy theorist hysteria to provide a basis for reflection on the double standard moralities that have pervaded English culture for centuries. Highly recommended.

  • The Hell-Fire Clubs is good enough in covering an interesting sidelight of British history, but the telling is rather routine and limited in what it covers. The author dips his toes rather than plunges into the milieu of squandered intelligence among wastrels. If you want to know what some Hell-Fire clubs were like, this will fill the gap. But if you want a close-up depiction, you will need to search for additional books.

  • This book used to be titled "Do What you will" -though the Hellfire Clubs are the real subject matter. The saying, "do what you will" was a more tenuous connecting theme. There are some small updates to the original text (which I have also read), but it is again largely a survey of the wonderful antics of the early British, American (Ben Franklin was an associate of Satanist types at least) and Irish gentleman-Satanists and sandwich-inventors. I wanted a copy of my own and couldn't resist revisiting these agreeable rakes and their adventures and antics. These clubs were dedicated to drinking, wenching, political intrigue, blasphemy, and various other forms of debauchery. Many such clubs have existed among upper class englishmen, and still do; these were the most colorful, and the note of blasphemy had a strong political/religious component which would not be present today. One of these days I have to try out their recipe for chicken ("... of venus") and "scaltheen" (whiskey with butter and brimstone).

  • This was an excellent history of the Hell-Fire Club Phenomenon in 18th Century England, as it tries very successfully, I think, to Contextualize the Clubs and their Members, within the various Political and Cultural developments of that Age.. It has some marvelous imagery and details, which bring smiles on about every other page. Take for instance an iced Cake that resembles a building which is then knocked down with miniature cannonballs by young ladies.. this was just some ancillary detail in the book about a symbolic event at a Hanoverian Prince's party.. A Lot of this book made me think of Peter Greenaway's very hard to find _Baby of Macon_.. As for a lack of "Moral Guidance".. Happily, Its really a "history", not some half-baked diatribe, or confected subjective "grotesque", like the author of the above reveiw wouldve wanted.. EEch!.. Very interesting and fun book.. and not at all some metaphysical curiosisty.. This is a small tightly researched little gem, at an affordable price.. And a good introduction to the more interesting underbelly of UK history.. I am now looking for a copy of _Strange Wycombe_ next! Enjoy!!! Oh, But one detraction.. It couldve used some nice color plates, like of the portraits of the Club-members, and pictures of like Edmund Curll, and the various places and people of the book.. Other than that... Great Stuff..

  • Ave Everyone,
    I have to say if your going to research all the Hell fire clubs this is the book for you. It sticks to facts about the clubs and it's members not like other books on the clubs that used mostly fiction. Geoffrey Ashe is a great writer and I am glad this book is still around. I recommend it to the people within the church I am in. So if you want to know what people do and some still do to have the most sexual delightful time then by all means buy this book.
    Always In The Dark,
    High Priest/Advisor Gino of the Temples Of Satan