mostraligabue
» » Aspects of Aristocracy (Penguin History)

ePub Aspects of Aristocracy (Penguin History) download

by David Cannadine

ePub Aspects of Aristocracy (Penguin History) download
Author:
David Cannadine
ISBN13:
978-0140249538
ISBN:
0140249532
Language:
Publisher:
Penguin Books (April 1, 1998)
Category:
Subcategory:
Europe
ePub file:
1370 kb
Fb2 file:
1336 kb
Other formats:
lrf lit lrf mbr
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
749

David Cannadine has taught at Columbia University, New York, where he is now Moore Collegiate Professor of History. This book consists of essays on particular aspects of the subject

David Cannadine has taught at Columbia University, New York, where he is now Moore Collegiate Professor of History. Series: Penguin history. Paperback: 336 pages. Publisher: Penguin Books (April 1, 1998). This book consists of essays on particular aspects of the subject.

Aspects of Aristocracy book. In this stylish and provocative book, the eminent historian David Cannadine brings his characteristic wit and acumen to bear on the British aristocracy, probing behind the legendary escapades and indulgences of aristocrats such as Lord Curzon, the Hon.

Sir David Cannadine FBA FRSL FSA FRHistS FRSA (born 1950) is a British author and historian, who specialises in modern history and the history of business and philanthropy. He is also President of the British Academy, the UK's national academy for the humanities and social sciences

In this stylish and provocative book, the eminent historian David Cannadine brings his characterisitc wit and acumen to bear on the British aristocracy, probing.

In this stylish and provocative book, the eminent historian David Cannadine brings his characterisitc wit and acumen to bear on the British aristocracy, probing. In this collection of essays, David Cannadine starts with the birth of a truly British upper class between the 1780s and 1820s, when a comparatively small group of families consolidated their grip on the levers of wealth, power and prestige.

His major works include The Decline and Fall of the British Aristocracy, Ornamentalism, Class in Britain and Mellon: An American Life

In his dazzling new book David Cannadine has created a bold, fascinating new interpretation of the British nineteenth century in all its energy and dynamism, darkness and vice. This was a country which saw itself at the summit of the world. And yet it was a society also convulsed by doubt, fear and introspection. His major works include The Decline and Fall of the British Aristocracy, Ornamentalism, Class in Britain and Mellon: An American Life.

Aspects Of Aristocracy. In considering some of the more famous aristocratic dynasties, Cannadine reconstructs the financial history of the dukes of Devonshire and offers his own assessment of Harold Nicholson and Vita Sackville-West. The text concludes with an attack on the way in which present aristocrates have managed to become subsidized guardians of their former stately homes.

Making 'Us vs. Them' History - David Cannadine. Aspects of Aristocracy: Grandeur and Decline in Modern Britain (1994).

Making 'Us vs. How Britain Dealt with Its National Decline: Churchill's Shadow (2003). David Cannadine talks about history in schools - The Guardian. The Rise and Fall of Class in Britain (1998). History in Our Time (1998).

Revised and re-printed in Cannadine, Aspects of Aristocracy

Aspects of Aristocracy: Grandeur and Decline in Modern Britain (Yale University Press, 1994, Penguin paperback, 1995). Class in Britain (Yale University Press, 1998; Columbia University Press, 1998; Penguin paperback, 2000, Japanese translation, 2008). History in Our Time (Yale University Press, 1998, Penguin paperback, 2000). Revised and re-printed in Cannadine, Aspects of Aristocracy.

David Cannadine, Aspects of Aristocracy (New York: Penguin Books, 1994), 158. we had a real. set in. Winston Churchill, My Early Life: A Roving Commission (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1930), 359. The unnatural and increasingly. Clive Ponting, Churchill (London: Sinclair-Stevenson, 1994), 101–2; private letter to Prime Minister Asquith. Years later, a young. William Manchester, The Last Lion: William Spencer Churchill: Alone, 1932–1940 (Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1988), 109.

In this remarkable collection of nine astute and superbly entertaining essays, historian David Cannadine offers his own observations about what makes the British aristocracy so powerful, vulnerable, quixotic, and endlessly fascinating. Starting with the birth of the British upper-class in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the essays provide a significant and provocative assessment of the roles these dynastic families played in the evolution of Britain's financial, geographic, and industrial history. Along the way, Cannadine critically dissects and rehabilitates the lives of Winston Churchill, Harold Nicolson, and Vita Sackville-West. Cannadine's uniquely informed perspective brings a mixture of sympathy and detachment, skeptical interest, and ironic fascination to the continuing drama of the aristocracy in modern history.
  • Well-written, this book is a supplement to the author's Decline and Fall of the British Aristocracy, a full treatment of the landed aristrocracy, and gentry, in the years of decline, from 1870. This book consists of essays on particular aspects of the subject. I thought it was fair in tone, the comments about the Churchills in particular are in line with evaluations in several biographies of Winston that I have read.

  • A splendid read by an excellent historian and fine writer. Highly recommended. Cannadine's books are always provocative and of real value.

  • This is a mean-spirited and vindictive book that makes no pretense about actually revelling in the mounting misfortunes of the British upper classes. It offers very little historical research, but a great deal of waxing eloquent on the uselessness of the aristocracy.

    He gets so into this, that much of what he says is wrong: he describes Winston "Churchill's family and forebearers were hardly those which any politician, eager to establish an unimpeachable public reputaition, would have freely chosen." Um, except that they were all well-respected politicians in their own right, and Winston's father had been considered, for many years, next in line to be Prime Minister (a raging case of syphillus drove him mad and that was the end of that... but his affliction was not public knowledge and wouldn't have hampered his son's career).

    He takes great joy in describing the misfortunes of the upper classes, without actually examining the causes: more often than not these declines had to do with the rising cost of living in a huge stone palace (as electricity, plumbing, and heating became necessary), the decline of the sevice industry (as factory work became a better option for the lower classes), the decline of the agricultural industry from which most of these people supported themselves with (as cheaper food could be imported from overseas), and a few significant stock market crashes. Instead, he drops hints that the sudden and disasterous lack of money was purely a personal fault.

    He discusses the people who hang on to their country houses but require government aid to support them, completely ignoring the fact that 1) the government won't let the owners tear them down because they're historic and architectural landmarks and 2) the owners literally can't GIVE them away because the National Trust is already glutted with them and can't afford the upkeep on the ones they already have.

    Cannadine's thesis is one that deserves taking into consideration: that it's time historians stopped fawning over the upper classes and started to look at them, warts and all. However, by the time this book was published, this was hardly an original notion and it was difficult to find a book that didn't take a critical view of the aristocracy. And it should be taken into consideration that, after a career built on mocking the upper classes, Mr. Cannadine's last TWO books have both been fawning histories talking about how the entire British Empire was built on the bravery, daring, and intelligence of the aristocrats. I guess he decided the tide had turned and it was time to jump on another bandwaggon?

  • Paints a vivid and broad picture of the British aristocracy which has declined precipitously in fortune, political power and status since about 1870. Mr. Cannandine's chooses not to explain the causes of the decline, however, with any percision. The various political reform acts, the rise of a rootless proletariate, the democratization of education, the agricultural decline starting about 1870, the decimation of young aristocrats in the trenches of World War One, the loss of confidence in the right to rule-these are either only briefly mentioned by Mr. Cannandine or not mentioned by Mr. Cannandine. He chose not to over-analyze. My chief criticism of the book is that in conclusion, Mr. Cannandine seems overjoyed with the declining relevance of his subject. That is a pity. The British aristocracy has done well by Britain. It is sad that Mr. Cannandine has a soulmate in Tony Blair, who is set to destroy the House of Lords this year.