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ePub Defense of the Rhine 1944–45 (Fortress) download

by Steven J. Zaloga,Adam Hook

ePub Defense of the Rhine 1944–45 (Fortress) download
Author:
Steven J. Zaloga,Adam Hook
ISBN13:
978-1849083874
ISBN:
1849083878
Language:
Publisher:
Osprey Publishing (March 22, 2011)
Category:
Subcategory:
Historical Study & Educational Resources
ePub file:
1152 kb
Fb2 file:
1596 kb
Other formats:
lit mbr lit lrf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
766

This latest offering by Mr Zaloga makes an ideal companion book to the author's earlier works: "The Siegfried Line 1944-45" and "Remagan 1945"

Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). This latest offering by Mr Zaloga makes an ideal companion book to the author's earlier works: "The Siegfried Line 1944-45" and "Remagan 1945". These earlier books describe the fighting between the adversaries to cross the Rhine while the latest book describes the fortifications that were built to help keep the Western Allies from entering Germany. By the end of 1944, there were 400,000 volunteers working the project.

Defense of the Rhine 1944–45 - Steven J. Zaloga. This book is the first comprehensive description in English of the 1944–45 West-Stellung fortification program. Design and development. Defense of the rhine 1944–45. The Rhine has been Germany’s traditional defensive barrier in the west since Roman times. Each pillbox, every city and village block must become a fortress against which the enemy will smash himself to bits or in which the German garrison will die in hand-to-hand fighting. There can be no large-scale operations on our part any longer.

Fortress 102. Author: Steven J. Illustrator: Adam Hook

Fortress 102. Illustrator: Adam Hook. The Rhine River represented the last natural defensive barrier for the Third Reich in the autumn of 1944. Although Hitler had been reluctant to allow the construction of tactical defence lines in France, the final defense of the Reich was another matter. Using detailed maps, colour artwork, and expert analysis, this book takes a detailed look at Germany's last line of defence.

As a result, construction of a Rhine defence line began in September 1944. The book describes the different places along the fortress and also considers how the line was actually defended. Steven J. Zaloga examines the multiple phases The Rhine River represented the last natural defensive barrier for the Third Reich in the autumn of 1944. As a result, construction of a Rhine defence line began in September 1944.

Steven J Zaloga, Adam Hook- Nr. 102. Facts. Szerző: Steven J Zaloga, Adam Hook

Steven J Zaloga, Adam Hook- Nr. Cím: Defense of the Rhine 1944-1945. Szerző: Steven J Zaloga, Adam Hook. We are aware of 10 similar reference publications related to "Uncategorised". The Maginot Line 1928-45. Fortress Nem. 10. William Allcorn, Jeff Vanelle, Vincent Boulanger. Germany's West Wall The Siegfried Line. 15. Neil Short, Chris Taylor.

Using detailed maps, colour artwork, and expert analysis, this book takes a detailed look at Germany's last line of defence.

Steven J. Zaloga, Adam Hook. Although Hitler had been reluctant to allow the construction of tactical defence lines in France, the final defense.

The Rhine River represented the last natural defensive barrier for the Third Reich in the autumn of 1944. Books related to Defense of the Rhine 1944–45. Zaloga (author), Adam Hook (illustrator). This book focuses on the land-based infrastructure of Germany's defense against the air onslaught. Another terrific handbook from author Zaloga. Besides active defense against air attack, Germany also invested heavily in passive defense such as air raid shelters. The copiously and clearly illustrated contents recap land-based German defenses against Allied air attacks - including purpose-built and dual-use structures for manufacturers, military and civilians. -David L. Veres, ww. ybermodeler. Zaloga Defense of the Rhine 1944-45 (Fortress). Whether you are a historian or modeler, Defense of the Rhine 1944-45 is an interesting book. Illustrator(s): Hook, Adam. Num Pages: 64 pages, Illustrations (some co. ISBN 13: 9781849083874. Defense of the Rhine 1944-45 (Fortress). BIC Classification: 1DFG; 3JJH; HBJD; HBLW; HBWQ; JWL.

The Rhine River represented the last natural defensive barrier for the Third Reich in the fall of 1944. Although Hitler had been reluctant to allow the construction of tactical defense lines in France, the final defense of the Reich was another matter. As a result, construction of a Rhine defense line began in September 1944. Steven J Zaloga examines the multiple phases of construction undertaken to strengthen the Westwall (Siegfried Line), to fortify many of the border villages, and finally to prepare for the demolition of the Rhine bridges. Using detailed maps, color artwork, and expert analysis, this book takes a detailed look at Germany's last line of defense.
  • A fine addition to the Osprey series, "Fortress." Here, the fortress at issue is the German fortification of the Rhine River. It began as the Westwall and became redesignated as the West-Stellung. The Westwall was operational early in the Second World War; it was, as the work terms it, a pale imitation of the opposing Maginot Line.

    A useful way of comparing the Westwall with West-Stellung is a map on page 5. The Westwall was a narrow line; the West-Stellung was a defense in depth with fortifications stretching many miles in depth. The Germans begin work on the deeper defensive line as their fortunes began to decline on the Western front. The line was in place by 1944 through 1945. However, it was not as sturdily fortified as desired.

    When Allied forces began to press against it, the soldiers defending the line were much degraded over what the German forces fielded earlier. The book describes the different places along the fortress and also considers how the line was actually defended. The book concludes by noting that (Page 60): "The value of the West-Stellung declined after the defeat of the Ardennes offensive, due in part to the drastic decline in the effectiveness of remaining German formations. . ."

  • good

  • Despite the limiting format of the Osprey fortification series (64 pages, of which about a third consists of illustration), this book does a very good job at examining its topic. The book is very well researched. It makes extensive use of both German and allied material and hence the reader gets a very good overview not only of the physical aspects of the fortifications but also how well they performed in combat. The reader learns how the fortifications were not adequately manned in terms of either quantity of manpower or quality. The troops defending these lines were of considerably lower quality than those on the front lines on the Atlantic Wall, for example. And that is saying a lot. The reader also learns how Hitler’s constant interference prevented the fortification from being used in a flexible manner. Hitler’s no fall back policy basically ironically forced the army to minimally man the fortifications and hence greatly reduced their usefulness.

    The author also discusses how the fortification lines were integrated into German tactical and strategic policy. Strategic in that they were intended to preserve better quality troops for offensive action. Tactical in that most troops were not intended to be within the fortifications but in earthworks around them where they could maintain better situational awareness and launch counter-attacks more easily. Unfortunately, considering the very poor quality of the troops manning them, the tactical level strategy did not play out very well in practice. Mr. Zaloga, the author, also provides a case study of how the typical line impacted actual fighting. This it did, very much like the Atlantic Wall, by slowing down advance at the front lines but not doing much more than that.

    The one weakness of the book, a major one, is that the book lacks an examination of whether or not the cost of the fortifications in terms of materials was worth the benefit. The fortifications obviously served as a force multiplier to their garrisons, especially considering the poor quality of troops manning them, in much the same way that the Atlantic Wall did in Normandy. It also enabled the Germans to make use of troops that would probably have not been able to have been used, because of their poor quality, outside of the fortified belt. It also enabled the Germans to husband the better troops to serve as a reserve for counter attacks and other more demanding roles. Were these benefits worth the costs however? Unfortunately the author does not answer this question.

  • This latest offering by Mr Zaloga makes an ideal companion book to the author's earlier works: "The Siegfried Line 1944-45" and "Remagan 1945". These earlier books describe the fighting between the adversaries to cross the Rhine while the latest book describes the fortifications that were built to help keep the Western Allies from entering Germany. By the end of 1944, there were 400,000 volunteers working the project. In addition to the fortifications, a discussion is made on how it would be armed and how the Volkssturm would man the line.
    In the introduction a general history describes the legacy of the West Wall; the rudimentary beginning during WWI, the expansion of the late 1930s and then the desperate final expansion of 1944-45 after the Normandy landings. By this time though with Hitler's fatalistic resistance and the nation's dwindling resources and the sudden surge of the Allies, the West Wall though still difficult to breach never achieved its potential. The Atlantic Wall had taken priority and the West Wall was scavenged to supply the other wall. By 1944 sectors of the West Wall were poorly supplied, void of guns or had antiquated guns. The situation was made worse by the huge losses of men and materiale the Germans suffered in the "Bulge".

    After the introduction, Mr Zaloga moves on to design and development of the 1500 mile project that transverse Army Group H, B, G sectors. Before construction began, a close study of the terrain was made to map out each pillbox, bunker, antitank wall and trench to achieve maximum support and resistance. The engineers created a three tier protection system based on bunker type. The lowest grade were the small MG pillboxes and worked its way to the highest grade which included artillery and personnel bunkers that could withstand a 1,000 lb blast.

    To help the reader understand the effectiveness of this defense zone, an example of an American assault on a fortified section in March 1945 is presented. The village is Steinfeld on the French border not far from the old Maginot line and is attacked by 7th Army. The area was considered important and the Germans built a dense defense zone that incorporated all types of fortifications as well as many of them. When Operation Undertone launched, it had the support of the 155mm guns that was needed to subdue the big bunkers. By April this sector and most of the Rhine line had been breached and the Allies were rushing toward Berlin. This engagement was brief but was sufficient to give the reader an understanding of the effectiveness of these defenses. Analysis and evaluation was presented to close the book.

    There were many great photos and color illustrations of all the fortifications, ideally placed in the book for the reader to see an example as the structure was being discussed. The photos also included the weaponry used in these bunkers. A photo of the rare Flakwerfer 44, which was a unguided anti aircraft missile launcher is shown and photos of camouflaged command posts that looked like typical homes but underneath were Grade A bunkers. In addition to the photos, there were tables to summarize the data that was presented.

    The author used mostly US and German archival data but presented a nice reading list if further research is wanted.

    As a standalone book or in conjunction with the other books mentioned, this book is an interesting and informative read that will appeal to many students of WWII.