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ePub Pentagon Of Power: The Myth Of The Machine, Vol. II download

by Lewis Mumford

ePub Pentagon Of Power: The Myth Of The Machine, Vol. II download
Author:
Lewis Mumford
ISBN13:
978-0156716109
ISBN:
0156716100
Language:
Publisher:
Harcour, Brace Jovanovich; First edition (March 20, 1974)
Category:
Subcategory:
Historical Study & Educational Resources
ePub file:
1521 kb
Fb2 file:
1711 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
636

Lewis Mumford was one of the 20th century's most important philosophers, and the two-volume set Myth of the Machine (Volume 1 is Technics and Human Development; and Volume 2 is The Pentagon of Power) are probably his most important books: the summation of his life's work.

Lewis Mumford was one of the 20th century's most important philosophers, and the two-volume set Myth of the Machine (Volume 1 is Technics and Human Development; and Volume 2 is The Pentagon of Power) are probably his most important books: the summation of his life's work. In writing as elegant as it is clear, Mumford makes plain the death urge that has always underlain civilization, which Mumford calls "the machine," and later "the megamachine.

The author, Lewis Mumford, shows the parallel developments between human tools and . 3 Volume II, The Pentagon of Power.

It is considered a synthesis of many theories Mumford developed throughout his prolific writing career Contents. Mumford dates the emergence of the "Machine" from the pyramid age (primarily with reference to Egypt, but also acknowledging other ancient cultures in that era which produced massive and precisely engineered structures).

Lewis Mumford has been referred to as one of the twentieth century's most influential "public intellectuals. A thinker and writer who denied the narrowness of academic speciality, Mumford embraced a cultural analysis that integrated technology, the natural environment, the urban environment, the individual, and the community.

Mumford, Lewis, 1895-1990. Vol. 2 has imprint: New York, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. Includes bibliographical references (v. 1, pages 297-323; v. 2, p. 439-469). Invention and the arts - Pioneers in mechanization - V. 2. The pentagon of power : New explorations, new worlds - Return of the sun god - The mechanized world picture - Political absolutism and regimentation - Science as technology - The polytechnic tradition - Mass production and human automation - Progress as 'science.

The Pentagon of Power book. In the second part of Lewis Mumford's "Myth of the Machine", he sets out to explore the consequences of the rise of the new sun god science and give an alternative to what he calls the new megamachine - the new organum. The book starts with Mumford tracing the mechanized world picture present in our society (according to him) back in history to such famous minds as Galileo and Descartes.

In this concluding volume of The Myth of the Machine, Mumford brings to a head his radical revisions of the stale .

In this concluding volume of The Myth of the Machine, Mumford brings to a head his radical revisions of the stale popular conceptions of human and technological progress. In this concluding volume of The Myth of the Machine, Mumford brings to a head his radical revisions of the stale popular conceptions of human and technological progress.

In this concluding volume of The Myth of the Machine, Mumford brings to a head his radical revisions of the stale popular conceptions of human and technological . The Pentagon of Power, المجلد 2. Lewis Mumford. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1974 - 496 من الصفحات.

Pentagon of Power : The Myth of the Machine, Vol. I. In this concluding volume of The Myth of the Machine, Mumford brings to a head his radical revisions of the stale popular conceptions of human and technological progress

Pentagon of Power : The Myth of the Machine, Vol. II. by Lewis Mumford.

He contends that these goals work against technical perfection, durability, social efficiency, and overall human satisfaction.

In this concluding volume of The Myth of the Machine, Mumford brings to a head his radical revisions of the stale popular conceptions of human and technological progress. Far from being an attack on science and technics, The Pentagon of Power seeks to establish a more organic social order based on technological resources. Index; photographs.
  • Reading this several decades after it was written (on the recommendation of a friend) provides some rear view mirror insight into utopian visions (or dystopian predictions) that did not pan out as expected.

    Its worth reading, if only to be reminded of the above.

  • What is most stunning about Mumford's assessment of our human predicament, at the time he wrote in 1970, is how astute his observations were regarding what the future would hold for us. Reading this some 50+ years after publication and it still feels quite fresh and relevant. A wonderful read from a time when people still dared consider an alternative to our current train wreck of a civilizational model. Read Mumford, Ellul and Ernest Becker and you just might restore your faith in the possibility that we humans can face the most frightening and overwhelming of concerns with an honesty and dignity all but absent in today's popular thought and discourse.

  • Lewis Mumford was one of the 20th century's most important philosophers, and the two-volume set Myth of the Machine (Volume 1 is Technics and Human Development; and Volume 2 is The Pentagon of Power) are probably his most important books: the summation of his life's work. In writing as elegant as it is clear, Mumford makes plain the death urge that has always underlain civilization, which Mumford calls "the machine," and later "the megamachine." This is a social structure organized not around any organic human needs, but around the "needs" of the machines that have come to characterize and control our lives. These are crucial, incisive, devastating books. I cannot praise them highly enough.

  • This is my first Mumford reading. I have to say the guy is brilliant. Excellent writing and very inciteful. This book is very long and dense. You really can savor a couple pages and let it sink in before continuing on. There is lots of philosophy here that I have never thought about in the way Mumford has.

    I'm giving 4 stars for a couple reasons. The first is that I think he is just plain wrong on some things. He keeps forgiving past scientific achievers for "they know not what they did" with respect to impacts on society. Really a stretch on some points and it gets old after reading the Galileo, Copernicus, etc. were all just so blind to their own impacts.

    The other reason is that the totality of the book is difficult to get through. Pick any paragraph and it is written extremely well. But keep going and your mind starts to wander with the verbal torrent that continues to gush. It just feels difficult to connect with for me.

  • Mumford was pretty conservative (in the traditional not neo-con sense) in his later years. This is a strong analysis of the decadence of the second half of the 20th Century. One should be well grounded in early works by Mumford to get the full value of this book.

  • Nobody writes like this anymore. I hadn't expected the eminent urban historian to write such a brilliant paranoiac tract against the System and Established Order. Although often redundant, Mumford makes a heroic attempt at explaining the current problems of our times, with roots in the Middle Ages, and perhaps even the Age of the Pyramids. He echoes contempories like Herbert Marcuse, Erich Fromm and Marshall McLuhan, but instead of taking a Marxist, psychological or media perspective, he takes the more general view of an urbanist. The arguments are quite paralell, although considerably more holistic at times. One recognizes critiques that were earlier or later articulated by not only Marxists, but also feminists, environmentalists, and anti-Imperialists. There are also anticipations of the New Age Movement! (See Fitjof Capra's "the Turning Point.")In short, this massive volume impressively combines much historical and cultural material in its critique of Modern Western Civilization. Although the tone of the book is quite bleak -- we would all appear to be trapped in this Megamachine, the High Technology of the Power Elites -- one also senses a hope towards last chapters that an alternative is possible. He seems to suggest a New Age style withdrawal, rather than any kind of organized resistance. Draw your own conclusions.

  • I can't really be bothered to say much. Basically, if this sort of subject is the kind of thing that appeals to you then I suppose you should read it. If you really want to.