mostraligabue
» » American Missiles: The Complete Smithsonian Field Guide

ePub American Missiles: The Complete Smithsonian Field Guide download

by Brian D. Nicklas

ePub American Missiles: The Complete Smithsonian Field Guide download
Author:
Brian D. Nicklas
ISBN13:
978-1848325173
ISBN:
1848325177
Language:
Publisher:
Casemate Publishers (July 9, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
Military
ePub file:
1839 kb
Fb2 file:
1168 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr lrf azw
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
414

The Complete Smithsonian Field Guide American Missiles by Brian D. Nicklas is the first book that covers all American missiles in the modern . military designation system from the MGM-1 (Matador) to the present RIM-174 ERAM. missile directories have only been snapshots of what missiles were active at the time. This field guide is pretty impressive in covering US guided missiles designated under the 1963 Tri-Service designation system for missiles, but it omits mention of the cancellation of the UUM-125 Sea Lance and it is a bit outdated because it doesn't cover guided missile designations beyond the RIM-174.

American Missiles: The Complete Smithsonian Field Guide. This comprehensive guide provides for the first time an illustrated listing of almost 200 of America’s most powerful missiles. American Missiles: The Complete Smithsonian Field Guide, Frontline Books. It contains information on all aspects of the missile’s specifications, including the speed and capacity of the explosives used in each warhead. American Missiles: The Complete Smithsonian Field Guide draws heavily on the Herbert S. Desind Photo Collection, a resource of more than 110,000 images recently catalogued at the National Air and Space Museum.

American Missiles book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking American Missiles: The Complete Smithsonian Field Guide as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Brian Nicklas is a life-long enthusiast of aviation and studied Aeronautical Studies at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida

Brian Nicklas is a life-long enthusiast of aviation and studied Aeronautical Studies at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida. Since 1987, he has been a member of the Archives Division of the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum. He lives near Washington DC. show more.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for American Missiles: The Complete Smithsonian Field . item 6 AMERICAN MISSILES, Nicklas, Brian D. -AMERICAN MISSILES, Nicklas, Brian D. £1. 6.

item 6 AMERICAN MISSILES, Nicklas, Brian D. item 7 American Missiles: The Complete Smithsonian Field Guide by Brian D. Nicklas, NEW -American Missiles: The Complete Smithsonian Field Guide by Brian D. Nicklas, NEW.

This book looks at the missiles given 'M for Missile' designations by the American military between the . Good visual guides to the various missiles proved to be hard to find and the author began work on producing this book.

This book looks at the missiles given 'M for Missile' designations by the American military between the introduction of that designation in 1962 and 2011. This brings us up to the RIM-174, a ship-borne missile that entered service in 2011. In a few cases not enough is known to justify a full page, and in one or two cases a single sentence suffices.

Hyperscale The Complete Smithsonian Field Guide American Missiles by Brian D. This, beautifully illustrated and invaluable work has been a labor of love for Nicklas, a Museum Specialist with the National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution for 22 years with the Archives Division.

Yorkshire, UK: Frontline Books, 2012. It also makes clear that the book is not intended as a history book or even as a technical guide. For those seeking more in-depth technical information or historical background, Nicklas has provided an excellent bibliography. They were included because they had a missile designation.

This remarkable guide provides for the first time an illustrated listing of almost 200 of America’s most powerful missiles. With information on all aspects of the missile’s specifications, including the speed and capacity of the explosives used in its warhead, this book provides a comprehensive guide to the US Army’s projectile hardware. 'American Missiles: The Complete Smithsonian Field Guide' draws heavily on the Herbert S. Desind Photo Collection, a resource of more than 110,000 images recently catalogued at the National Air and Space Museum. Of interest to both the specialist and the aviation enthusiasts, this book demonstrates the evolution of American missile design over the last forty years in an accessible and entertaining format.
  • AMERICAN MISSILES covers almost all of the missiles in U. S. service since 1962, when the Department of Defense adopted the current Military Designation System, which standardized aircraft and missile designations across the services. Some missiles apparently were not redesignated and therefore are not covered in this book. The subjects range from the Matador (MGM-1) to the Extended Range Active Missile (RIM-174), and the book includes guided missiles, target drones, amd guided bombs thereby providing comprehensive coverage of the overall subject area. All missile types, i. e., surface-to surface, surface-to-air, air-to-surface, air-to-air, and underwater-to-surface, are included. In sevice and out of service missiles are addressed as are systems that were purely developmental and never entered service.

    The book gnerally dedicates one page to each missile; although, a few of the more prominent, e. g., Trident, may be given two pages. Each entry contains two or three black and white or color photographs (mostly color), a table of specifications, and a short one or two paragraph description. The photos are fairly small, and some are not the most descriptive or of reasonably decent quality. No real program histories are provided, but some development highlights are sometimes included.

    The organization of the book is a bit unusual in that the entries are presented in accordance with their sequential Military Designation Numbers instead of by category. This means all missile types are mixed together making it somewhat difficult to locate and compare missiles of a given type. The author provides cross reference lists relating names to Military Designation Numbers, but I would have preferred major sections of the book to be organized by type followed by Military Designation Number.

    A major shortcoming of the book is the total omission of range from the tables of specifications. This is an important parameter in missile performance, and the author does not explain why it is not included.

    Although I am not an expert in this field, I did note some errors of fact in some of the entries. They were generally minor and not critical to the primary description of the affected entry, but it causes one to wonder how many other errors and their significance may be found in the book.

    In summary, the book covers the subject fairly well. The price is surprisingly high, particularly given that it was printed in India, is a physically small volume without high quality photographs, and is limited in the information provided for each entry. I gave it three stars based on value.

  • This field guide is pretty impressive in covering US guided missiles designated under the 1963 Tri-Service designation system for missiles, but it omits mention of the cancellation of the UUM-125 Sea Lance and it is a bit outdated because it doesn't cover guided missile designations beyond the RIM-174.

  • A very good quick referance when you need it!

  • very good for the missile history from the beginning of rocket age, but you can't found inside technical informations on guidance and technical parts
    except some about range and rocket propellant.

  • Good reference but not worth the price. A $4.99 paperwork would be an appropriate value. Organization of the book is by missile design number, which means AIMs, AGMs, UUMs, and other mission types are mixed together. I spent a fair amount of time in the table of contents but it was not obvious where to find a particular missile. Also, the technical content of each entry is usually restricted to a paragraph or two, covering major highlights and some history. Generally speaking, wikipedia has greater detail.

  • Most of the missiles by name, I've vague memories of but never seen them side by side. My taxes paid for them and now I get to see them. I enjoyed the book.

    What I missed: Range of the missile. Numbers produced. Speed, as appropriate. Cost of each unit & contract development. User reports (the good, the bad, the indifferent). Such a fascinating topic deserves more than just a collection of pictures and some data.

  • Doesn’t even get to the text of the book. Dah!

  • This is a well-indexed and cross-referenced book. Would appeal to writers of military history and also military fiction. Great documentation and footnotes. Good job, Brian Nicklas!

    Carl Cline