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ePub The Future of Warfare download

by Bevin Alexander

ePub The Future of Warfare download
Author:
Bevin Alexander
ISBN13:
978-0393037807
ISBN:
0393037800
Language:
Publisher:
W W Norton & Co Inc (July 1, 1995)
Category:
Subcategory:
Military
ePub file:
1789 kb
Fb2 file:
1923 kb
Other formats:
doc azw lit mbr
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
729

235 pages ; 22 cm. What are the strengths of our armed forces, and how can we best use them? What will future conflicts be like, and who will succeed? When should we intervene in military situations.

235 pages ; 22 cm. What are the strengths of our armed forces, and how can we best use them? What will future conflicts be like, and who will succeed? When should we intervene in military situations, and when should we remain neutral? Bevin Alexander answers these questions and more by discussing the nature of . military policy (including the restraints imposed by our democratic traditions), and by examining the future makeup of the .

How Great Generals Win (1993). The Future of Warfare (1995).

Korea: The First War We Lost (1987). The Strange Connection: . Intervention in China, 1944-1972 (Contributions to the Study of World History) (1992). How Great Generals Win (1993). Robert E. Lee's Civil War (1999)

Bevin Alexander is the author of How Great Generals Win, Lost Victories, and Inside the Nazi War Machine. My main criticism is that this book fails to look over the horizon where the future of warfare lies.

Bevin Alexander is the author of How Great Generals Win, Lost Victories, and Inside the Nazi War Machine. He lives in Bremo Bluff, Virginia. There is no mention of the military future of space. One of the first commercial applications of space colonization will be to build large solar collectors that could supply the power requirements of our nation. These would have auxiliary uses in warfare.

This work examines the role of military strategy in the post-Cold War era, arguing that the former great powers will most likely engage in small-scale battles

This work examines the role of military strategy in the post-Cold War era, arguing that the former great powers will most likely engage in small-scale battles. The use of guerrilla tactics will enable small countries to defeat or weaken superior military forces and undermine their technological superiority. This book opens with and excellent explanation of the vital interests of the United States that would result in war. It goes on to discuss the probable near term trends and development in warfare, with historical examples to explain these trends. If your interest is military history and probable near term military developments, this is an excellent book.

The Future of Warfare book. Bevin Alexander is an American military historian and author. He served as an officer during the Korean War as part of the 5th Historical Detachment. Predicts a new direction for .  . His book Korea: The First War We Lost was largely influenced by his experiences during the war. Bevin has served as a consultant and adviser to several groups due to his military expertise, including work for the Rand Corporation, work as a consultan Bevin Alexander is an American military historian and author.

Contrary to its title, this book is not about the future of warfare, but rather the types of war the author expects the US to.Alexander makes the very striking claim that the Vietcong carried the main burden of the fighting from first to last.

Contrary to its title, this book is not about the future of warfare, but rather the types of war the author expects the US to get involved in next. Sections of Alexander's (Lost Victories: The Military Genius of Stonewall Jackson, 1992, et. far-flung book deal miscellaneously with Korea, Mao's military theories, Lawrence of Arabia, the Boer War, and Vietnam.

The Future of Warfare by Bevin Alexander and Publisher W. W. Norton & Company. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780393342796, 0393342794. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780393332407, 0393332403. Note that the availability of products for purchase is based on the country of your billing address. Some items may have regional restrictions for purchase. Canadian customers may purchase from our stores in Canada or the US. Canada.

Other Books by Bevin Alexander. The Future of Warfare. Lee’s Civil War. Korea: The First War We Lost. Intervention in China 1944–1972. Lost Victories: The Military Genius of Stonewall Jackson. How Great Generals Win.

Predicts a new direction for U.S. foreign policy in the aftermath of the cold war while describing the strategies of future adversaries and exploring past successes and failures as a means of advising readers on how to remain globally superior.
  • This book changed all my ideas about warfare. Great book!

  • I did not want to give the book a one review because the author , like many military leaders, simply lacks historical knowledge in spite of being a professor.
    " Closed autarkic empires imply selfish aggression, rather than peaceful trade". Nonsense. China did not want trade till the British pushed opium into China to destroy it. So who was the selfish aggressor ? More. " President Roosevelt assured the Japanese that they could secure all the raw materials they desired on the world market, so long as they renounced aggression ". Really ?Roosevelt drew the Japanese to war. He knew of Pearl Harbor attack in advance because the Japanese codes were deciphered months before- yet he kept silent. So much for hidden history. The very reason that Japan went to war was because they were denied raw materials and refused to take loans- the international bankers connection.
    Going back in history- "Hunger and despair of the people begat the French Revolution of 1789 ' -wrong. The hunger was created in Paris by blocking food supplies. Thugs from south of France were brought in to raise hell. The revolt was well organized and financed like the Russian Revolution or recently the "revolt" in Libya to steal gold and oil.
    Saddam invaded Kuwait in 1990 because our representative , a woman, told him that the US could care less. Ambassador Wilson was punished for telling the truth by having his wife exposed by Bush as a CIA agent which is a crime .So the author is wrong about Saddam and just repeats the official Imperial propaganda.
    Mr. Alexander was right about Viet Nam. " American leaders were wrong in committing an army to solve a political problem ".Wonderful-did he know why it was done ?
    Overall the depth of his analysis seems shallow, so I do not plan to read more of his books. There are just too many books based on propaganda and truth is hard to find. The book is disappointing to say the least.

  • This book opens with and excellent explanation of the vital interests of the United States that would result in war. It goes on to discuss the probable near term trends and development in warfare, with historical examples to explain these trends. If your interest is military history and probable near term military developments, this is an excellent book. I have read several of Bevin Alexander's books and consider him to be a fine and insightful author and historian. As with all of his books, this one could use more maps, as this would greatly facilitate following his explanation of battles and campaigns.
    My main criticism is that this book fails to look over the horizon where the future of warfare lies. There is no mention of the military future of space. One of the first commercial applications of space colonization will be to build large solar collectors that could supply the power requirements of our nation. These would have auxiliary uses in warfare. They could be used in varying intensity to raise the temperature of a battlefield or small country from a few dozen, to hundreds of degrees, in order to discourage or kill an adversary. They could also be used indirectly to influence the weather and rainfall on the planet. Another aspect of a space presence is that it results in complete command of the seas. It is extremely expensive to operate our carrier battle groups and they are more vulnerable than purported. This would be unnecessary if we had a military presence in space. From space one can "shoot" asteroids accurately that would strike at approximately 20 times the muzzle velocity of a rifle. These dumb iron asteroids could be sized from a few ounces (with and ablative coating) to millions of tons. They would provide the ability to sink any ship, destroy any bunker, or country on earth. In the airburst mode they would be effective against soft, or small fast targets i.e. tanks, missiles in the boost phase, or troops. Asteroids are cheep and impossible to defend against. These systems would be operated by a small number of people who would be invulnerable to retaliation. In a nutshell, military control of space can result in low cost, uncontestable, absolute, military dominance of the planet. This is the future of warfare and it does not even receive comment in this book.
    Another benefit of industrializing space is that it would eliminate another of the causes cited for future wars, namely a monopoly of vital commodities, chromium, cobalt, oil etc. Oil would be less critical if there was limitless cheep electricity from solar power satellites. We could also create synthetic oil or hydrogen using this electric power. All other critical elements should exist in the easily mined moon.
    In short a means of obtaining low operational cost, long term military dominance of the planet while at the same time eliminating most of reasons he cites for going to war deserves at least a chapter. But, even given the above, the first chapter alone is worth the price of the book and the time to read it.