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ePub The Dieppe Raid: The Story of the Disastrous 1942 Expedition download

by Robin Neillands

ePub The Dieppe Raid: The Story of the Disastrous 1942 Expedition download
Author:
Robin Neillands
ISBN13:
978-1845131661
ISBN:
1845131665
Language:
Publisher:
Aurum Press (September 5, 2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Military
ePub file:
1173 kb
Fb2 file:
1949 kb
Other formats:
rtf lrf doc mbr
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
995

The Dieppe Raid is one of World War II's most controversial hours. In this book, Robin Neillands has traced numerous surviving veterans of the Raid, in the United Kingdom and Canada, to tell the harrowing story of what actually took place, hour by hour, as disaster unfolded.

The Dieppe Raid is one of World War II's most controversial hours. In 1942, a full two years before D-Day, thousands of men, mostly Canadian troops eager for their first taste of battle, were sent across the English Channel in a raid on the French port town of Dieppe. Air supremacy was not secured; the topography-a town hemmed in by tall cliffs and reached by steep beaches-meant any invasion was improbably difficult.

Veteran military author, Robin Neillands reopens the case in his striking new version of Canada's Dieppe Raid of August 19, 1942. Mr. Neillands states "The focus of this book is on why the planners and many of the participants got it so terribly wrong and what factors contributed most directly to the chaos and slaughter on the beaches

The Dieppe Raid book.

The Dieppe Raid book. The Dieppe Raid is one of World War II's most controversial hours  . When it is all said and done, Robin Neillands’ book may be the best thing that came out of the aftermath; that and the lessons learned when it came to the amphibious raids that ultimately led to VE Day, May 8, 1945. A must read under the heading Lest we forget.

Neillands, Robin, 1935-2006. Bloomington : Indiana University Press.

On 18 August 1942, Berkeley escorted the Dieppe raiding force. Neillands, Robin (1 January 2005). Indiana University Press.

The Dieppe Raid is one of WWII's most controversial events.

Part of the Twentieth-Century Battles Series).

Book Binding:Paperback. Robin Neillands' other acclaimed works of military history include The Bomber War, The Old Contemptibles, Eighth Army and The Battle of Normandy. He lives in Hampshire. World of Books Ltd was founded in 2005, recycling books sold to us through charities either directly or indirectly. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Country of Publication.

Dieppe at dawn the story of the Dieppe raid. Souvenirs and ephemera. Souvenirs and ephemera Photographs. Combined operations commando RAID on dieppe, 1942. How has war in the air changed over time? KS3-4.

Book by Robin Neillands British military historian Robin Neillands tells this story of the Dieppe Raid with considerable skill, presenting a view of the operation within the context of the overall war mixed with judiciously chosen individual experiences and anecdotes.

Book by Robin Neillands. Neillands's discussion of this engagement is first rate.

Documenting one of World War II’s most controversial campaigns, this decisive guide provides an in-depth view of how, a full two years before D-Day, thousands of men—mostly Canadian troops eager for their first taste of battle—were deployed across the Channel in a poorly organized raid on the French port town of Dieppe. Revealing that air supremacy had not been secured, and that the topography of the town and its near-impenetrable surroundings were impossible to overcome, this startling account presents allegations of a dark conspiracy that resulted in the utter carnage of the attempted invasion—with entire regiments literally decimated before the troops had reached the shores. Striving to reveal the facts behind the myths, and debating whether the invasion was an attempt to prove to the Americans—at the expense of many Canadian lives—the impracticality of staging the Normandy landings for another two years, this intriguing volume is an invaluable resource for those captivated by the path of military history.

  • Former Royal Marine Robin Neillands gives the story of one of the most controversial and horrific Allied defeats in World War II with great energy, verve, and expertise, using a mix of research and interviews with survivors of the battle. He addresses the questions of responsibility for the fiasco, and discusses whether the sacrifice of so many Canadians was worth the candle.

    I highly recommend this book.

  • Very interesting story about a monumental screw up that resulted the tragic deaths of many good men.

  • This is an excellent book about a "trial run" for the 1944 Normandy invasion. Additionally, the book explains the limited involvement in this operation by the United States.

  • Great book, good history. It's a brutal fact in war that if the brass worry more about the politics of war more so than their soldiers then that means trouble. The Canadian chain of command-LTG A.G.L. McNaughton,GOC-in-C and 1st Canadian Corp Commander, LTG H.D.G. Crerar had the legal responsibility to cancel the operation and MG Ham Roberts should have called the Mission off. The Canadians brass failed their soldiers. Hindsight is 50-50.

  • I found it a little difficult to get through this one. This was the first book I have read on the subject and was very excited to learn more. For the most part it was very informative and gave me a good understanding of the command structure, planning process, and eventual raid itself. The only negatives that I can say about this book are that it is very repetitive. A little too many "as we have seen" moments. Yes, we realize that the planners were not prepared or educated on amphibious assaults. Yes, we realize that there was a tremendous lack of air cover, and artillery cover from the Royal Navy. The telling of the assault itself is by far the highlight of the book. It is a great testament to the brave men who sacrificed so much to do a job that was tainted from the very beginning. Another quick observation is that the author is clearly biased toward the British. Of course he openly states that the British CCOS were at fault for the planning and other examples as well, but in his conclusion he finds a way to thumb his nose at the Canadian officers on HMS Calpe. I also found it very distasteful on how he was explaining the lessons learned from the failed raid. Neilland writes on how the British and Canadians failed tactics of the Dieppe Raid were corrected and put to the test during the D-Day landings. Neilland continues by saying, "It is noticeable that where these innovations were not employed on D-Day, as the Americans neglected to employ them on OMAHA beach... the casualty figures certainly indicate that something went very wrong here; if Dieppe provided a number of lessons to the Allies, the US Army -or General Omar Bradley- declined to learn from them." You are absolutely right Mr. Neilland. Something did go very wrong. The 29th and 1st Army Divisions faced the most heavily defended beach of the whole invasion. I nearly stopped reading the book right then and there. He drops in a few of these jabs at the Americans throughout the book. If you were to read this book, I would strongly urge you to read only the operation portion of the book.

  • There is something intriguing about a military disaster. In America, they continue to rehash Pickett's Charge and Custer's Last Stand. The British ponder what went wrong at The Somme, Gallipoli, and Dunkirk. For Canadians -- its all about the Dieppe catastrophe.

    In a little over six hours, 4132 out of 6000 men became casualties assaulting a small German occupied French seaport just across the English Channel. By tea- time, the Dieppe Raid became the greatest Canadian catastrophe in World War II -- and all for what?

    Veteran military author, Robin Neillands reopens the case in his striking new version of Canada's Dieppe Raid of August 19, 1942. Mr. Neillands states "The focus of this book is on why the planners and many of the participants got it so terribly wrong and what factors contributed most directly to the chaos and slaughter on the beaches. It seems a worthwhile project to take Operation Jubilee apart, clear away some of the more common myths and account for the tragic loss of so many men."

    In the early chapters of Mr. Neillands' narrative, each step of the planning is skillfully dissected and exposed where fault is found: The cancellation of heavy bomber and capital ship support -- the poor radio communications plan -- the lack of clear objectives -- the absence of an overall commander -- an inflexible plan of attack.

    Unlike the planners of Operation Jubilee, Mr. Neillands, also the author of The Battle for the Rhine The Battle for the Buge and the Ardennes Campaign, 1944, has presented his meticulously researched arguments and findings in a lucid, well thought out manner -- he misses nothing.

    In seven bloody, smoke-filled chapters, the author tells the waterlogged tale of men struggling in the ocean and along the seawall -- the assault boats of No. 3 Commando blundering into a German convoy -- bullet-ridden landing craft loaded with dead and wounded -- virtually every radio set destroyed right from the beginning -- heroic soldiers charging gun pits with fixed bayonets -- Churchill tanks hopelessly stranded on the promenade -- bodies rolling about in the waves -- hundreds of men cowering behind knocked out tanks and landing craft along the shingle -- eventually, abandoned men on the beach swimming for miles to reach withdrawing ships. Mr. Neillands' remarkable reconstruction of the battle from east to west makes clear the troops had little chance of success.

    Reaching a verdict, Mr. Neillands finds no fault with the splendid fighting men from Canada and Britain, who eagerly sailed to France -- as should be apparent now, true blame must rest with their fidgety leaders and inept planners. In these pages, men at the top are scrutinized and found lacking. In planning: the entire British Chiefs of Staff Committee; and in the field: Major-General Hamilton 'Ham' Roberts, commander of the 2nd Canadian Division -- all must share responsibility.

    Though its not much comfort to the families of the 2nd Canadian Division, the Allies thankfully learned from the Dieppe fiasco, and went on to successfully carryout important amphibious invasions in North Africa, Sicily, Italy, Normandy, and southern France.

    "The Dieppe Raid: The Story of the Disasterous 1942 Expedition" contains five handy maps and a section of 35 photographs.