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ePub Literary Capital and the Late Victorian Novel download

by N.N. Feltes

ePub Literary Capital and the Late Victorian Novel download
Author:
N.N. Feltes
ISBN13:
978-0299136604
ISBN:
0299136604
Language:
Publisher:
University of Wisconsin Press (March 1, 1993)
Category:
ePub file:
1281 kb
Fb2 file:
1828 kb
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4.4
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536

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Feltes, N. N. Feltes.

Early Victorian nonfiction prose. Late Victorian literature. Victorian literature began with such humorous books as Sartor Resartus and The Pickwick Papers. The Victorian theatre. Late Victorian fiction may express doubts and uncertainties, but in aesthetic terms it displays a new sophistication and self-confidence. Despite the crisis of faith, the Condition of England question, and the ache of modernism, this note was sustained throughout the century.

Good: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Binding has minimal wear. The majority of pages are undamaged with some creasing or tearing, and pencil underlining of text, but this is minimal. No highlighting of text, no writing in the margins, and no missing pages. See the seller’s listing for full details and description of any imperfections.

Victorian novels tend to be idealized portraits of difficult lives in which hard work, perseverance, love and luck win out in the end. They were usually inclined towards being of improving nature with a central moral lesson at heart. While this formula was the basis for much of earlier Victorian fiction, the situation became more complex as the century progressed. Characteristics of Victorian poetry. Victorian Poetry was also indifferent from the already stated style.

December 15, 2009 History. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Published by University of Wisconsia.

Feltes' study of how the concepts of form, format, and genre evolved over this period should provide new insights into the cultural place of the modern novel.

Avrom Fleishman, The English Historical Novel (1971). Kate Flint, The Woman Reader, 1837-1914 (1993). Guinivere L. Griest, Mudie's Circulating Library and the Victorian Novel (1970). Josephine M. Guy, The Victorian Social-Problem Novel: The Market, the Individual and Communual Life (1996). Elaine Hadley, Melodramatic Tactics: Theatricalized Dissent in the English Marketplace, 1800-1885 (1995). John Halperin, Egoism and Self-Discovery in the Victorian Novel (1974).

A major later novel was George Eliot's (1819–80) Middlemarch (1872) .

A major later novel was George Eliot's (1819–80) Middlemarch (1872), while the major novelist of the later part of Queen Victoria's reign was Thomas Hardy (1840–1928), whose first novel, Under the Greenwood Tree, appeared in 1872 and his last, Jude the Obscure, in 1895. The Victorian era was an important time for the development of science and the Victorians had a mission to describe and classify the entire natural world.

"Literary Capital and the Late Victorian Novel" analyses novel production in its broadest historical sense in the 1880s and 1890s. Seeing the shift in these decades to be from a petty-commodity literary mode of production to a capitalist literary mode of production, N.N. Feltes redefines publishing as "literary capital" and then explores the implications of this change for the novel. Feltes' Marxist structuralist interpretation asserts that as the idea of books as business became increasingly widespread, the gap between author and publisher widened. Literary agents appeared on the scene to mediate. The concept of "value", as applied both to the market value of the literary text as product and to the intellectual and cultural value of a given literary work, was given a capitalist translation. Publishing took two different forms: "list", which was concerned with books intended to remain valuable over time, and "entrepreneurial", which distributed books expected to sell quickly and then lose their value. In his later chapters Feltes investigates primary sources solidly grounding his conclusions in a historical context. He employs diaries, publishers' records, and novels of the 1880s by Henry James, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Walter Besant to show how the new structures of publishing combined with authors' ideologies to fuel the debate over the "art of fiction", and carries the discussion over into the next decade of writers, examining the ideas and processes used in producing novels by Arnold Bennett, Marie Corelli, and Hall Caine. "Literary Capital" contextualises early capitalist writings and publishing within a determinate time frame. Feltes' study of how the concepts of form, format, and genre evolved over this period should provide new insights into the cultural place of the modern novel.