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ePub The Templars: The Dramatic History Of The Knights Templar, The Most Powerful Military Order Of The Crusades download

by Piers Paul Read

ePub The Templars: The Dramatic History Of The Knights Templar, The Most Powerful Military Order Of The Crusades download
Author:
Piers Paul Read
ISBN13:
978-1898801597
ISBN:
1898801592
Publisher:
Phoenix Press; Unknown edition (2005)
Category:
ePub file:
1134 kb
Fb2 file:
1811 kb
Other formats:
mobi doc rtf txt
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
517

Examines the history and legacy of the warrior monks, discussing their successful capture of the city of Jerusalem during the Crusades, and their eventual demise.

Examines the history and legacy of the warrior monks, discussing their successful capture of the city of Jerusalem during the Crusades, and their eventual demise.

One of the most interesting parts of the book is an appendix entitled "The Later Crusades" - setting an ever broader historical context. Read deals in what I consider sufficient detail with all of the major myths and accusations that have surrounded the Templars from that time up to now, disposing of them in a reasonable (if not totally conclusive, because we are dealing with history, after all) manner.

From Publishers Weekly.

In 1099, the city of Jerusalem, a possession of the Islamic Caliphate for over four-hundred years, fell to an army of European knights intent on restoring the Cross to the Holy Lands. In this articulate and engaging history, Piers Paul Read explores the rise, the catastrophic fall, and the far-reaching legacy of these knights who took, and briefly held, the most bitterly contested citadel in the monotheistic West.

A source of enduring contemporary curiosity, the Knights of the Temple of. .A highly readable and nicely paced book that draws on the lessons of modern.

Piers Paul Read reveals the Templars - in their white tunics with red crosses over chainmail - as the first uniformed standing army in the western world, as well as pioneers of international banking. Read's history of the Templars is magnificent in every way' - Mail on Sunday. A highly readable and nicely paced book that draws on the lessons of modern historical scholarship while also communicating a sense of narrative excitement and drive' - Evening Standard.

The Knights Templar remain the most glamorous, but also the most mysterious, of all religious . Those who didn't like this book probably read at the 4th grade level. This book is a condensed history of around 1400 years.

Those who didn't like this book probably read at the 4th grade level. To fully understand we start at the beginning. We learn who all the "players" are. Who was a pawn. Who was a nasty little manipulator.

In this engrossing chronicle, spanning three centuries, Piers Paul Read tells the bloody story of the Templars’ rise to political and financial power throughout Europe and the Holy Land, their catastrophic fall, and. their far-reaching legacy.

Sifting myth from history, Piers Paul Read reveals the Templars - the multinational force of warrior monks, in their white tunics with red crosses over chainmail. They were not only unique among Christian institutions but constituted the first uniformed standing army in the western world and became pioneers of international banking

In 1099, the city of Jerusalem, a possession of the Islamic Caliphate for over four-hundred years, fell to an army of. In this articulate and engaging history, Piers Paul Read explores the rise, the catastrophic fall, and the far-reaching legacy of these knights who.

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  • Fantastic book on the history of the Crusades, the Christianity prior to the Crusades, and the Templars themselves. While it does not go deep into the battles or the tactics it does well represent the politics and motivations as well as a very in-depth history. It even touches on the Muslims political machinations and the Assassins. I was also happy to see discussions of the business and banking practices of the Templars.

  • I rated it a three star based on: Pro's:s It definitely gives you a history of the times preceding the templars on to their period of history and beyond
    Cons: It has so much detail it can get confusing as to who was who, what family, what order of Monks, etc. It might be my age, but I think if written with less detail and more general oversight it may have been a more pleasant read. I would stil recommend it if you want a long detailed read.

  • This is a straightforward, historical account, which is a refreshing change compared to the countless books and articles that promote a Templar myth of some sort. According to Read, the Templars were a dedicated, devout group that believed in their mission of supporting the Crusades and did not have an ulterior motive or a hidden agenda. They were also well-organized and did manage to accrue a considerable amount of power and wealth over two centuries, which may have been the biggest single factor contributing to their downfall -- plain old greed and envy on the part of various kings, nobles, officials, and other orders. The narrative is straightforward, well-researched, and highly detailed, and provides a fascinating look at the Crusades overall as well as other political and social events of the time, such as the other crusading orders and the major heresies and schisms that occurred during that period. One of the most interesting parts of the book is an appendix entitled "The Later Crusades" -- setting an ever broader historical context. Read deals in what I consider sufficient detail with all of the major myths and accusations that have surrounded the Templars from that time up to now, disposing of them in a reasonable (if not totally conclusive, because we are dealing with history, after all) manner. Of course we know that the Templar myth has been latched onto by all sorts of people and groups in order to justify some view of history or provide some rationale for their own existence -- kind of like the way very ordinary people try to lay claim to noble ancestry. But Read dismisses this as sensationalism with no solid historical basis.

    As I said, the book is extremely detailed and this can be confusing at times, especially since so many of the names are the same or similar, and the author has to circle back at times in order to provide the full context and bring in other narrative threads. Being a "visual learner", I would have appreciated a lot more maps, charts, and lists; it would have helped keep straight all the complex interactions among the major players (not to mention all of the complicated blood ties among the various royal, noble, and religious personages). But overall it is an excellent effort -- worthy of the sweeping scope of the subject matter. I would recommended it as a basic text when it comes to the Templar history, by which I mean "read this first" then you'll have a better basis upon which to judge other works on the subject.

  • Last year, following a short visit to Malta, I read The Great Siege of Malta by Ernie Bradford (informative and fast paced) and then got deeper and deeper into reading about the clash of Moslems and Christians, the Crusades, the Middle East, the Jews, the Arabs, etc. So when I saw this book in a shop window in Amsterdam I returned to buy it but it was already gone and I got my copy from amazon. Well, it was a good refresher on the history of the Crusades but surprisingly thin on the Templars themselves. It was illuminating to read how the crusading orders were the great corporate bodies of the medieval world, that it took 5,000 acres of farmland to support a knight, etc, etc, but I'd say only about a quarter of the book was specifically on Templars - the rest was a Crusade review. Again, I am glad I read that review, bringing to a close a year of reading in this area, but as a book on Templars it was rather thin. Curiously enough, I had this book with me on a recent trip to New Zealand where I stayed in the home of a prominent local farmer who pulled out papers tracing his lineage to Geoffrey de Buillon, whom crusaders had elected the Emperor of Jerusalem. What a small world!

  • I thought this was a really well-written, thoughtful and balanced book on the Templar legends. Its a subject that has attracted a lot of writings - and this is one of the best! I've enjoyed Mr Read's writing ever since "Alive", and this is good stuff - I was actually surprised I'd missed this particular book of his all this time!

  • Don't be fooled into believing that this is a book about the legendary Templars of the Middle Ages. It's not. It is a history book that is chock full of events that occurred in the Middle East at the time of the Crusades. There are bits and pieces about the Templars but there are just as many bits and pieces about the Hospitallars and the Teutonic Knights. There is a lot of history about the various personalities of the time including Richard the Lionheart and Saladin and history about the battles but nothing exclusively about the Templars. If you are looking for a book to give you some background on the events in the Middle East at this time, then read this book. But, if you are looking for the history of the Templars specifically, this is not the book for you.

  • This book is popular fiction, which the author clearly states in the preface. That being said, the book read like a general overview of the Crusades, with occasional references to the Templars thrown in. I felt like the Templars got squeezed out of their own book.

    The first section provided a good overview of the three Abrahamic faiths and the reason why the Temple was so important. Read is a novelist and the style of this book was like a novel; he's not an academic historian and it would not be fair to compare him to them. The book was readable and kept a pretty decent pace, but some of his statements seemed quite contradictory to things I've read in other books.

    In conclusion, a good overview of religious backgrounds for the Crusades, and of the key events of the Crusades, but it seemed rather lacking on the Templars themselves.