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ePub Itinerant Kingship and Royal Monasteries in Early Medieval Germany, c.936-1075 (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Fourth Series) download

by John W. Bernhardt

ePub Itinerant Kingship and Royal Monasteries in Early Medieval Germany, c.936-1075 (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Fourth Series) download
Author:
John W. Bernhardt
ISBN13:
978-0521394895
ISBN:
0521394899
Language:
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (October 29, 1993)
Category:
Subcategory:
World
ePub file:
1687 kb
Fb2 file:
1542 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
436

for anyone interested in medieval life and thought, his book is indispensable.

for anyone interested in medieval life and thought, his book is indispensable. The series in which John Bernhardt's book appears has provided us with some of the best monographs on the Middle Ages that have been written in English in recent years. His work, enriched by genealogical tables and maps, is a worthy addition to the series. Patricia DeLeeuw, Church History. He carefully qualifies the strength of his evidence, clearly saying when his argument is certain, what is difficult to estimate,.

John W. Bernhardt, San José State University, California. Publisher: Cambridge University Press. Itinerant Kingship and Royal Monasteries in Early Medieval Germany, . 36–1075.

Itinerant Kingship and Royal Monasteries in Early Medieval Germany, . 36-1075 (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Fourth Series). Download (pdf, . 1 Mb) Donate Read.

Start by marking Itinerant Kingship and Royal Monasteries in Early .

Start by marking Itinerant Kingship and Royal Monasteries in Early Medieval Germany, . 36 1075 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. This book examines the relationship between the royal monasteries in tenth- and eleventh-century Germany and the German monarchs.

By John W. Bernhardt

By John W. Bernhardt. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought, fourth series, 21. (New York: Cambridge University Press. And since monastic life, unlike episcopacy, never has been for men only, Bernhardt reveals (without quite accenting) the immense contribution of women to the working of monarchy.

Itinerant Kingship and Royal Monasteries in Early Medieval Germany, c. 936-1075 pp. ALL Author: Bernhardt, J. W. Favourites: ADD. Sign-in.

Cambridge studies in medieval life and thought Fourth series. German kingship and royal monasteries: the historical and historiographical context. Published: 24 December 2009. by Cambridge University Press (CUP). in Itinerant Kingship and Royal Monasteries in Early Medieval Germany,c. Itinerant Kingship and Royal Monasteries in Early Medieval Germany,c. 936–1075 pp 377-378; doi:10.

Kingship and Royal Monasteries in Early Medieval Germany, C. 936-1075. This book examines the relationship between the royal monasteries in tenth- and eleventh-century Germany and the German monarchs

book by John W. Itinerant Kingship and Royal Monasteries in Early Medieval Germany, C. by John W.

Series: Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Fourth Series. File: PDF, . 1 MB. Читать онлайн.

This book examines the relationship between the royal monasteries in tenth- and eleventh-century Germany and the German monarchs. It concludes that German rulers did in fact make much greater use of their royal monasteries than has hitherto been recognized. Series: Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Fourth Series.

Cambridge University Press, 1993. Pp. xix, 376; 2 genealogical tables, 11 maps. oceedings{Pavlac1995JohnWB, title {John W. Bernhardt, Itinerant Kingship and Royal Monasteries in Early Medieval Germany, c. 936–1075. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought, 4th se. 2. Cambridge, En. Cambridge University Press, 1993.

This book examines the relationship between the royal monasteries in tenth- and eleventh-century Germany and the German monarchs. It focuses on the practical aspects of governing without a capital and while constantly in motion, and on the payments and services that monasteries provided to the king and that in turn supported the king's travel economically and politically. It concludes that German rulers did in fact make much greater use of their royal monasteries than has hitherto been recognized.