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ePub Reckless Rites: Purim and the Legacy of Jewish Violence (Jews, Christians, and Muslims from the Ancient to the Modern World) download

by Elliott Horowitz

ePub Reckless Rites: Purim and the Legacy of Jewish Violence (Jews, Christians, and Muslims from the Ancient to the Modern World) download
Author:
Elliott Horowitz
ISBN13:
978-0691138244
ISBN:
0691138249
Language:
Publisher:
Princeton University Press; First Edition edition (September 22, 2008)
Category:
Subcategory:
World
ePub file:
1809 kb
Fb2 file:
1895 kb
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
496

Horowitz's ambitious book achieves two accomplishments: the documentation of 1,500 years of Christian and Jewish .

Horowitz's ambitious book achieves two accomplishments: the documentation of 1,500 years of Christian and Jewish interpretations of the knottiest, and naughtiest, sections of the Book of Esther, and then the chronicling of the actual social-historical consequences of those interpretations; that is, how Purim was used and abused through the ages. This book, subtitled Purim and the Legacy of Jewish Violence, everything is viewed through the prism of the violence inflicted by the Jews upon their enemies at the end of Esther. While arguably, the violence at the end is only a minor part of the story for some that aspect has clouded everything about the Book of Esther and Purim.

Reckless Rites book .

Some historians have distorted these records for anti-Semitic purposes. Horowitz ends with a description of the carnival-like character of Purim and the phenomenon of local Purims where a community would celebrate its own delivery from destruction. Interestingly, he equates that phenomenon with the British celebration of Guy Fawkes night.

Jewish Book Council, founded in 1944, is the longest-running organization devoted exclusively to the support and celebration of. .

Jewish Book Council, founded in 1944, is the longest-running organization devoted exclusively to the support and celebration of Jewish literature. Reckless Rites is a well-honed distillation of Professor Horowitz’s previously published work (mostly in Hebrew) on the topic, which examines the history of Jewish/ non-Jewish relations carefully and thoroughly mulls over the issue of how the need for reasonable Jewish toughness has helped preserve Jewish life in many trying times and circumstances.

In Reckless Rites, Elliott Horowitz takes a new and forthright look at both the history of Jewish violence since late .

In Reckless Rites, Elliott Horowitz takes a new and forthright look at both the history of Jewish violence since late antiquity and the ways in which generations of historians have grappled with that history.

Author : Horowitz Elliott Title : Reckless rites Purim and the legacy of.

Author : Horowitz Elliott Title : Reckless rites Purim and the legacy of jewish violence Year : 2006. The special Torah reading, drawn from the book of Deuteronomy (25:17-19), from which that Sabbath draws its name, opens with the command to "remember what Amalek did" and concludes with the ringing (yet to some chilling) exhortation to "blot out the remembrance of Amalek from under heaven.

Jews, Christians, and Muslims captures the increasingly sophisticated attention paid by scholars in recent decades to the historical relations-political, social, intellectual, and cultural-among these three groups. The series publishes innovative and wide-ranging scholarship that addresses an expansive array of issues, such as political and economic conflict; religious, intellectual, and social interactions; and mutual influences in ritual, liturgy, imagery, symbols, literature, law, family, and other spheres.

Series: Jews Christians and Muslims from the ancient to the modern. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read

Series: Jews Christians and Muslims from the ancient to the modern. File: PDF, 3. 0 MB. Читать онлайн. org to approved e-mail addresses. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Основы лесопаркового хозяйства.

Arab Christians have used two forms of invocations that were affixed to the . The world will then unify under this leader

Arab Christians have used two forms of invocations that were affixed to the beginning of their written works. They adopted the Muslim bismillāh, and also created their own Trinitized bismillāh as early as the 8th century. The Jews follow the Torah as their word (both the written Torah and the Oral Torah) and they believe in the eventual coming of a Mashiach/Messiah (more)Loadin. The world will then unify under this leader. All three of these religions believe the same central ideas but they all have their own interpretations about what that that means and how it is supposed to occur.

Radical Zionists and settlers

Radical Zionists and settlers  . Bruce Feiler writes of ancient history that "Jews and Christians who smugly console themselves that Islam is the only violent religion are willfully ignoring their past.

Judaica, Jewish Studies. United States Jewry, 1776-1985. Revolutionary Yiddishland: A History of Jewish Radicalism. Dark Mirror: The Medieval Origins of Anti-Jewish Iconography. United States Jewry 1776-1985: The East European Period : The Emergence of the American Jew Epilogue. A Living Revolution: Anarchism in the Kibbutz Movement. James Horrox and Uri Gordon. More titles on this list . Section(s).

Historical accounts of Jewish violence--particularly against Christians--have long been explosive material. Some historians have distorted these records for anti-Semitic purposes. Others have discounted, dismissed, or simply ignored the evidence, often for apologetic purposes.

In Reckless Rites, Elliott Horowitz takes a new and forthright look at both the history of Jewish violence since late antiquity and the ways in which generations of historians have grappled with that history. In the process, he has written the most wide-ranging book on Jewish violence in any language, and the first to fully acknowledge and address the actual anti-Christian practices that became part of the playful, theatrical violence of the Jewish festival of Purim. He has also examined the different ways in which the book of Esther, upon which the festival is based, was used by Jews and Christians over the centuries--whether as an ancient mirror of modern tribulations or as the scriptural basis for anti-Semitic claims regarding the bloodthirstiness of the Jews.

Reckless Rites reassesses the historical interpretation of Jewish violence--from the alleged massacre of thousands of Christians in seventh-century Jerusalem to later medieval attacks on Christian symbols such as the crucifix, transgressions that were often committed in full knowledge that their likely consequence would be death.

A book that calls for major changes in the way that Jewish history is written and conceptualized, Reckless Rites will be essential reading for scholars and students of history, religion, and Jewish-Christian relations.

  • This book, subtitled Purim and the Legacy of Jewish Violence, everything is viewed through the prism of the violence inflicted by the Jews upon their enemies at the end of Esther.

    While arguably, the violence at the end is only a minor part of the story for some that aspect has clouded everything about the Book of Esther and Purim. First Horowitz looks at how the Book was viewed by non-Jews. Some had a very negative view due to the Jewish revenge. They considered that motif, un-biblical (read non-Christian). Horowitz goes through each of the characters and how first non-Jews interpreted their actions. For instance, Mordechi was treated rather harshly by many of these commentators as was Esther due to her passivity. What is especially fascinating is how these non-Jewish understandings, at times, crept into Jewish thought as well. Thus, Horowitz documents Jews parroting these rather un-Jewish, at it were, interpretations.

    Horowitz then tackles the overarching theme of Amalek and how this has been understood throughout history. Some hold there is no obligation of destroying Amalek today while others are willing to label any perceived enemy of Jews as deserving of the harsh consequences of Amalek. Some of these examples are rather disturbing.

    After dealing with the Book of Esther specifically, Horowitz turns his focus to Jewish practice on Purim. Specifically, he deals with Jewish violence or violent acts on Purim directed at non-Jews. He provides a discussion of the stereotype of the "mild" (read the wimp) Jew including its origins and whether it is borne out by history. He then discusses numerous, diverse examples spanning from the 5th century until today of Jewish violence. Some is not physical violence, instead it is host desecration or general enmity of non-Jewish symbols while other, most recently Barukh Goldstein is physical violence in its worst form.

    In an effort to play down some of these incidents, we have Jewish historians who decided to avoid discussion of such matters, or at times downplay their significance. However, in light of the many examples here, it is very difficult to ignore such examples. Horowitz is very convincing in the scope of this idea and how prevalent this is. It is especially telling when tracing and seeing how systematically Jews have decided to sweep under the rug these examples, it demonstrates that censorship is not limited to any one group and even amongst supposedly dispassionate scholars, they too can fall prey to their own biases.

    The detail and research is amazing , Horowitz leaves no stone unturned. All in all, this book sheds new light of the story of Purim, the Book of Esther and Jewish history. It provides a new way of viewing the story of Esther and Jewish ideas towards violence.

  • Horowitz is one of the most original historians of Jewish cultural and intellectual history writing today. This book is in turn surprising, unnerving and enchanting, and disposes of pious presuppositions about the changing image and force of violence in Jewish religious thought. A tour de force.

  • Elliot Horowitz tries to make a new reading of Jewish history as a whole. He wants to argue for the idea that violence on the part of Jews has been in the Diaspora an important and predominant factor. However the number of illustrations he can muster to prove his point is few. And what he does instead is provide a skewed misreading of Diaspora Jewish history as whole.

    It may be true that Jewish history for two thousand years consists in more than victimization. But there is no proportion whatsoever between the horrifying violence done to Jews in these years to the trifling in comparison violence done by them.

  • I through this book in the trash after reading part way through it. I am
    a Christian who teaches adult Jewish studies courses including a 22-week
    course on antisemitism. In my opinion this is antisemitism at its worst
    by an author with a Jewish surname. (I personally question if it actually written by a Jew - if so I'd say he has a great deal of self-
    hatred).

    The Jews represent less than 1% of the world's population and never have
    had much more than this. To believe they (as victims of non-Jewish persecution for more than 2000 years)have done all this violence to non-
    Jews is ridiculous. They've spent most of their history hunkered down in
    fear.

    This book will accomplish nothing but fan the flames of antisemitism
    and is disgusting.