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by Paul N. Siegel

ePub The Meek and the Militant: Religion and Power Across the World download
Author:
Paul N. Siegel
ISBN13:
978-1931859240
ISBN:
1931859248
Language:
Publisher:
Haymarket Books (September 1, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
World
ePub file:
1259 kb
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1764 kb
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
304

Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world and the soul of soulless conditions.

Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world and the soul of soulless conditions. It is the opium of the people. Here, Marx is saying that it is not just a case of the oppressed being brainwashed by the ruling class. It is also the case that people understandably turn to religion as a comfort. This reinforces the Marxist argument that religion cannot and should not be banned. Finally, as well as discussing all these general points with great clarity, Siegel also gives us a run through the social history of the world’s major religions, using the Marxist method of analysis. I thoroughly recommend this book.

Paul Siegel (1916–2004), a writer and activist, published numerous books on literature and politics, including Shakespeare in His Time and Ours (1968). Be the first to ask a question about The Meek and the Militant. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

Find books like The Meek and the Militant: Religion . Goodreads members who liked this book also liked: Eski Yakındoğu: Sümer'den Kutsal Kitap'a.

Find books like The Meek and the Militant: Religion and Power Across the World from the world’s largest community of readers. Everyone knows that Marx wrote, religion is the opium of the people, but all too frequently this aphorism is regarded as exhausting what he and Engels had to say on the subject. Shelve The Meek and the Militant: Religion and Power Across the World.

Shakespeare in His Time and Ours. Book by Siegel, P.

Recipient fellowship Fund for Advancement of Education, 1952-1953. Member Columbia University Shakespeare Seminar. Paul Siegel (1916–2004), a writer and activist, published numerous books on literature and politics, including Shakespeare in His Time and Ours (1968). 59248/?tag prabook0b-20. Shakespeare in His Time and Ours. 02533/?tag prabook0b-20.

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PAUL SIEGEL, AN internationally known authority on the role of Christian thought in Shakespeare’s plays, and a devoted member of the organization Socialist . Siegel’s mother was religious and the family kept a kosher home

PAUL SIEGEL, AN internationally known authority on the role of Christian thought in Shakespeare’s plays, and a devoted member of the organization Socialist Action, died on April 26, 2004 in New York City. Siegel was 87 years old and had been suffering from stomach cancer. Siegel’s mother was religious and the family kept a kosher home. Paul was not required to attend synagogue, although a bar mitzvah was obligatory. Growing up in Paterson and Hackensack, Paul was very bookish.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 8. 6% restored. Главная The meek and the militant. The meek and the militant. ISBN 13: 978-1931859240.

Paul N. Siegel (1 September 2005). The Meek and the Militant: Religion and Power Across the World. p. 210. ISBN 978-1-931859-24-0. Retrieved 23 May 2011.

Thursday, September 18, 2014. Paul N. Siegel's work is from a Marxist point of view. The second half of the book looks at the social origins of the world's major religions. Siegel - The Meek and the Militant: Religion and Power Across the World. The question of religion has always been an important one for revolutionaries. This important, but slightly dated work, is an essential read for those attempting to understand the historic and social role of religion. He sees religion, not as a crude y force which holds back workers and dims their outlook, but as Karl Marx did, dialectically. In doing so, Siegel shows how religion has often played a dual role.

In a time when it seems that religious justifications for the excesses of both revolutionary and reactionary impulses are the standard, Haymarket Books republication of Paul Siegel’s The Meek and the Militant is a useful resource for the individual . .

In a time when it seems that religious justifications for the excesses of both revolutionary and reactionary impulses are the standard, Haymarket Books republication of Paul Siegel’s The Meek and the Militant is a useful resource for the individual looking for a rational analysis of the relationship between religion and power.

Everyone knows that Marx wrote, “religion is the opium of the people,” but all too frequently this aphorism is regarded as exhausting what he and Engels had to say on the subject. In fact, they presented a penetrating critique of religion that explains its origin and persistence.—from the preface

This classic volume sheds much-needed light on a topic of renewed interest: the impact of religion on politics, whether Islam in the Middle East or right-wing Christian fundamentalism in North America.

Paul Siegel (1916–2004), a writer and activist, published numerous books on literature and politics, including Shakespeare in His Time and Ours (1968).

  • The picture painted by the capitalist media and education system of the relationship between Marxism and religion generally goes something like this:

    (1) Marxists are atheists.
    (2) Religion was/is suppressed under “Marxist” regimes such as the USSR, China etc.
    (3) Marxists see religion as a tool used by the ruling class to brainwash the masses into accepting their exploitation.
    (4) Marx described religion as “the opium of the people”.

    In this excellent book, Paul Siegel sets the record straight on these matters.

    The first of the above propositions is generally true. Marxists do indeed look for materialist explanations of natural and social phenomena. But on the second point, genuine Marxists, including Marx, Engels and Lenin, did not and do not seek to ban religion. The suppression of religion in Russia, Eastern Europe, China etc was carried out by Stalinist regimes which called themselves Marxist, but were/are actually bureaucratic state capitalist tyrannies which had nothing to do with genuine Marxism.

    Marxists aim to achieve a democratic workers’ state, leading ultimately to a classless society. Siegel shows that Marxists argue for the separation of church and state, and for people to be free to follow whatever religion they choose. But Marxists also believe that in a classless society religion will wither away, because people will not feel the need for it any more. (I always think of John Lennon’s “Imagine” in relation to this.)

    On the third point, it is certainly true that religion has often been a useful ideological tool for ruling classes, as is the case, for example, with the doctrine of the “Divine Right of Kings”. Obey the King or you’ll go to hell! And the great American rebel Joe Hill pointed out that religion conned people into believing that you’ll get “pie in the sky when you die”.

    But Siegel also shows that Marxists understand that on some occasions religion can inspire the oppressed to rebel. In the English Civil War King Charles believed that he ruled by divine right, but on the other side the revolutionary parliamentarians were also inspired by their different version of Christianity. And it is obvious that the Christianity of Martin Luther King was a very different thing from the “Christianity” of Donald Trump. In fact, Marxists often work alongside progressive religious people in campaigns against racism, Islamophobia etc.

    In relation to the fourth point above, the quotation actually goes like this:

    “Religious suffering is at one and the same time the expression of real suffering and a protest against real suffering. Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world and the soul of soulless conditions. It is the opium of the people.”

    Here, Marx is saying that it is not just a case of the oppressed being brainwashed by the ruling class. It is also the case that people understandably turn to religion as a comfort. This reinforces the Marxist argument that religion cannot and should not be banned. The solution is to create a just society in which people will no longer feel the need for a false comfort.

    From Enlightenment philosophers to present-day atheists of the Richard Dawkins type, many anti-religious people have spent their time directly attacking religion for being unscientific, irrational and reactionary. Marxists agree with many of these criticisms of religion. But they do not waste much time directly attacking religion. Instead they fight to achieve a better society and thus remove the root cause of people’s need for religion. (The other function of religion - as an “explanation” of things that humans do not understand - is already in retreat as scientific knowledge advances.)

    Siegel also shows that:
    (a) Morality is a social product. That which is called morally “good” is actually what is good for society, or, in a class society, what is good for a particular social class.
    (b) Religious belief is a form of alienation, which means that people are dominated by their own creations. As Marx wrote in “Capital”, “As, in religion, man is governed by the products of his own brain, so in capitalist production, he is governed by the products of his own hand.”

    Finally, as well as discussing all these general points with great clarity, Siegel also gives us a run through the social history of the world’s major religions, using the Marxist method of analysis.

    I thoroughly recommend this book.

    Phil Webster.
    (England)

  • The picture painted by the capitalist media and education system of the relationship between Marxism and religion generally goes something like this:

    (1) Marxists are atheists.
    (2) Religion was/is suppressed under “Marxist” regimes such as the USSR, China etc.
    (3) Marxists see religion as a tool used by the ruling class to brainwash the masses into accepting their exploitation.
    (4) Marx described religion as “the opium of the people”.

    In this excellent book, Paul Siegel sets the record straight on these matters.

    The first of the above propositions is generally true. Marxists do indeed look for materialist explanations of natural and social phenomena. But on the second point, genuine Marxists, including Marx, Engels and Lenin, did not and do not seek to ban religion. The suppression of religion in Russia, Eastern Europe, China etc was carried out by Stalinist regimes which called themselves Marxist, but were/are actually bureaucratic state capitalist tyrannies which had nothing to do with genuine Marxism.

    Marxists aim to achieve a democratic workers’ state, leading ultimately to a classless society. Siegel shows that Marxists argue for the separation of church and state, and for people to be free to follow whatever religion they choose. But Marxists also believe that in a classless society religion will wither away, because people will not feel the need for it any more. (I always think of John Lennon’s “Imagine” in relation to this.)

    On the third point, it is certainly true that religion has often been a useful ideological tool for ruling classes, as is the case, for example, with the doctrine of the “Divine Right of Kings”. Obey the King or you’ll go to hell! And the great American rebel Joe Hill pointed out that religion conned people into believing that you’ll get “pie in the sky when you die”.

    But Siegel also shows that Marxists understand that on some occasions religion can inspire the oppressed to rebel. In the English Civil War King Charles believed that he ruled by divine right, but on the other side the revolutionary parliamentarians were also inspired by their different version of Christianity. And it is obvious that the Christianity of Martin Luther King was a very different thing from the “Christianity” of Donald Trump. In fact, Marxists often work alongside progressive religious people in campaigns against racism, Islamophobia etc.

    In relation to the fourth point above, the quotation actually goes like this:

    “Religious suffering is at one and the same time the expression of real suffering and a protest against real suffering. Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world and the soul of soulless conditions. It is the opium of the people.”

    Here, Marx is saying that it is not just a case of the oppressed being brainwashed by the ruling class. It is also the case that people understandably turn to religion as a comfort. This reinforces the Marxist argument that religion cannot and should not be banned. The solution is to create a just society in which people will no longer feel the need for a false comfort.

    From Enlightenment philosophers to present-day atheists of the Richard Dawkins type, many anti-religious people have spent their time directly attacking religion for being unscientific, irrational and reactionary. Marxists agree with many of these criticisms of religion. But they do not waste much time directly attacking religion. Instead they fight to achieve a better society and thus remove the root cause of people’s need for religion. (The other function of religion - as an “explanation” of things that humans do not understand - is already in retreat as scientific knowledge advances.)

    Siegel also shows that:
    (a) Morality is a social product. That which is called morally “good” is actually what is good for society, or, in a class society, what is good for a particular social class.
    (b) Religious belief is a form of alienation, which means that people are dominated by their own creations. As Marx wrote in “Capital”, “As, in religion, man is governed by the products of his own brain, so in capitalist production, he is governed by the products of his own hand.”

    Finally, as well as discussing all these general points with great clarity, Siegel also gives us a run through the social history of the world’s major religions, using the Marxist method of analysis.

    I thoroughly recommend this book.

    Phil Webster.
    (England)