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ePub Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman Period (Summary Conclusions) (Vol. 12) (v. 12) download

by Erwin Ramsdell Goodenough

ePub Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman Period (Summary  Conclusions) (Vol. 12) (v. 12) download
Author:
Erwin Ramsdell Goodenough
ISBN13:
978-0691097572
ISBN:
0691097577
Language:
Publisher:
Princeton University Press; First Edition edition (November 21, 1965)
Category:
Subcategory:
World
ePub file:
1358 kb
Fb2 file:
1679 kb
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
887

12. Summary And Conclusions - Goodenough, E. R. Archaeology, Vol. 20, No. 1 (Ja. 1967), pp. 76-77.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman Period, Volume 12: Summary and Conclusions as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Jewish Symbols in the. by Erwin Ramsdell Goodenough.

Early Christian Ethics in Interaction with Jewish and Greco-Roman Contexts. 2 Enoch and the Trajectories of Jewish Cosmology: From Mesopotamian Astronomy to Greco-Egyptian Philosophy in Roman Egypt

Early Christian Ethics in Interaction with Jewish and Greco-Roman Contexts. J. W. van Henten & Jozef Verheyden (ed. - 2013 - Brill. The Jurisprudence of the Jewish Courts in Egypt. G. M. & Erwin R. Goodenough - 1930 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 50:353. A Gold Treasure of the Late Roman Period A Gold Treasure of the Late Roman Period. By Walter Dennison Swarthmore College. 2 Enoch and the Trajectories of Jewish Cosmology: From Mesopotamian Astronomy to Greco-Egyptian Philosophy in Roman Egypt. Annette Yoshiko Reed - 2014 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 22 (1):1-24. The Art of Letters, Lu Chi's Wen Fu, . 302. By E. Hughes.

Home Goodenough, Erwin R. Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman . Book has some tiny stains and marks to top edge of pages

Home Goodenough, Erwin R. Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman Period, Volume Twelve (12),. Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman Period, Volume Twelve (12), Summary and Conclusions. Book has some tiny stains and marks to top edge of pages. otherwise book is nearly as new, especially for its age. Dust jacket has chipping and wear to corners, ragged messy tear at bottom of spine, price-clipped, some edgewear. though not pretty it is now protected in a mylar cover, which minimizes defects. Overseas shipping would be much more. Volume Twelve: Summary and Conclusions ( Bollingen Series 37, Vol. 12), Goodenough, Erwin R.

Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman Period. XII: Summary and Conclusions. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. IX-XI: Symbolism in the Dura Synagogue. Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman Period. Vol. Jonathan A. Goldstein. The Sources of the Creation Story-Genesis 1:1-2:4. Nanay and Her Lover: An Aramaic Sacred Marriage Text from Egypt. Adam and Eve in Babylonian Literature.

Home Erwin R. Goodenough JEWISH SYMBOLS IN THE . Bibliographic Details. Andre Strong Bookseller and Red Gap Books have two shops in Blue Hill, on the coast of Maine

Home Erwin R. Goodenough JEWISH SYMBOLS IN THE GRECO-ROMAN PERIOD, VOL. 12 - SUMMARY AND. Title: JEWISH SYMBOLS IN THE GRECO-ROMAN PERIOD,. Publisher: Pantheon/ Bollingen Series, New York. Publication Date: 1965. Andre Strong Bookseller and Red Gap Books have two shops in Blue Hill, on the coast of Maine. One is a used book shop with a wide selection of subject for big readers, and the other is Red Gap Rare, an elegant space with a large, ever- changing collection of books for collectors. The entire stock of Red Gap rare is listed on abebooks. Visit Seller's Storefront.

Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman Period - Erwin Ramsdell Goodenough

This volume presents the most important portions of Erwin Goodenough's classic thirteen-volume work, a magisterial attempt to encompass human spiritual history in general through the study of Jewish symbols in particular. carousel previous carousel next. Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman Period - Erwin Ramsdell Goodenough.

This volume presents the most important portions of Erwin Goodenough's classic thirteen-volume work, a magisterial attempt to encompass human spiritual history in general through the study of Jewish symbols in particular. Revealing that the Jewish religion of the period was much more varied and complex than the extant Talmudic literature would lead us to believe, Goodenough offered evidence for the existence of a Hellenistic-Jewish mystic mythology far closer to the Qabbalah than to rabbinical Judaism. Originally published in 1989.

Jewish Symbols In The Gr. .has been added to your Cart. A light bump to the top edge of the early pages leaves a narrow 2" long band of wrinkled creasing on the top edge of the first two pages, 1" on the next two pages and slight evidence on the next page. A light smudge on the top of the page block near the bumping. A light to moderate slant to the spine, but it may be from binding, since there is little other signs of reading internally. Other than the described bump to the top edge, a very good + book.

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The concluding volume of Professor Goodenough's magnum opus, presenting the results of his researches into the hellenistic influences on early Judaism.

  • This is a very thought-provoking book, and the fact that virtually all scholarly opinion now discounts Goodenough’s theory, does not make it any the less so. This book, which makes his work accessible to the layman, is a summary by Jacob Neusner of the 13 volumes of which it was originally composed. Goodenough’s theory is that, in parallel with the Rabbinical Judaism that is the only form of the religion to have survived, there was another current – widely practiced – which was heavily influenced by and reflective of the Romano-Hellenistic culture in which it was embedded. His main evidence for this Hellenistic strain of Judaism is the rich corpus of Hellenistic influenced Jewish art that has survived from late antiquity. The art and its symbology is the source of Goodenough’s theory, and the second half of the book – and apparently most of the original 13 volumes – consists of detailed interpretations of specific examples. However, the arguments that he presents in the first half of the book, to support his theory, are fascinating and very credible. From my reading of historians such as Seth Schwartz, and a question I put to archaeologist Jodi Magness, it seems that current scholarship rejects the specifics of Goodenough’s theory – his interpretation of the symbols – rather than the essence of it; that there was - at least one – other strain of Judaism in late antiquity, which was largely outside of Rabbinic influence.

    The existence of Jewish art and symbols in contexts that modern day mainstream Rabbinic Judaism would find questionable – to say the least - is the main evidence for a non-Rabbinic strain. Goodenough, writing in the early 1950’s, brings as his prime examples, symbols and figurative representations in the Jewish catacombs of Rome, the necropolis at Bet Shearim, and – above all – the synagogue at Dura- Europos. He also mentions the 6th century CE synagogue mosaic floor at Bet Alfa, with its zodiac and figure of Helos at the center. He was writing prior to the discovery of other similar synagogue floors at Hamat Tiberius, Sepphoris and other places, which make it evident how common was this form of synagogue decoration in the 4th to 6th centuries CE. However you want to interpret the zodiac with Helos and his chariot, in juxtaposition to figures representing the seasons, Biblical scenes like the binding of Isaac, and Temple-related images, you have to explain how such a departure from Biblical and later Rabbinic iconoclasm could have occurred. More recent discoveries, such as the synagogue mosaics at Hukok near the Sea of Galilee, only serve to emphasize how rich and varied was the borrowing of Hellenistic images for use in the synagogue.

    Goodenough bolsters his theory with other circumstantial evidence. He posits that a Hellenistic Judaism, which was probably much less exigent for its adherents than the Rabbinic version, was the vector that facilitated the rapid spread of Christianity throughout the Roman empire in the 2nd and 3rd centuries. Presumably, this was the version of Judaism that would have attracted many gentiles – the Book of Revelations’ “those who say they are Jews” – and provided an early “on-ramp” to monotheism. He also tries to draw a connection between his interpretation of the symbols and the writings of Philo of Alexandria; it would certainly be very convincing if it could be shown that the most prominent member of the Jewish community of this the most Hellenistic of cities was an exponent of a different version of Judaism. The consensus however is that Goodenough fails to establish this connection. Perhaps some of his arguments do not hold water – although that is hard for the general reader to judge – but many of them are convincing at face value, and there is certainly no denying the prime evidence - the symbols and the art itself - for something deviant going on. Personally, I find any explanation, that does not include synagogue-based Jewish worship outside of the sphere of Rabbinical influence, very hard to accept.

  • A classic!