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ePub Living Dangerously in Korea: The Western Experience, 1900-1950 (The Missionary Enterprise in Asia) download

by Donald N. Clark

ePub Living Dangerously in Korea: The Western Experience, 1900-1950 (The Missionary Enterprise in Asia) download
Author:
Donald N. Clark
ISBN13:
978-1891936111
ISBN:
1891936115
Language:
Publisher:
EastBridge, a nonprofit corporation (March 1, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
World
ePub file:
1711 kb
Fb2 file:
1614 kb
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
112

In 2005 Choice named Living Dangerously in Korea an Outstanding Academic Title

In 2005 Choice named Living Dangerously in Korea an Outstanding Academic Title. Dr. Clark has written a most valuable book that all those interested in modern Korean history and in Korea's international relations will find rewarding for its insights into the nature of Korea during a tumultuous half-century. "Pacific Affairs" V7. (A. Hamish Ion, Royal Military College of Canada).

Living Dangerously in Korea book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Living Dangerously in Korea: The Western Experience, 1900-1950 as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Living Dangerously in Korea: The Western Experience, 1900-1950 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Items related to Living Dangerously in Korea: The Western Experience .

Items related to Living Dangerously in Korea: The Western Experience,. Donald N. Clark Living Dangerously in Korea: The Western Experience, 1900-1950 (The Missionary Enterprise in Asia). ISBN 13: 9781891936210. Living Dangerously in Korea: The Western Experience, 1900-1950 (The Missionary Enterprise in Asia).

Clark?s vast knowledge and familiarity with modern Korea and with the Western .

Clark?s vast knowledge and familiarity with modern Korea and with the Western community is apparent. Clark thoroughly evaluates a wealth of primary sources to provide an extraordinary monograph about Westerners and their arduous experience in Korea?illuminates major historical events of modern Korea as seen through foreign eyes, and narrates Western residents? tacit assistance in the underground Korean nationalist movement. Choice ?Living Dangerously in Korea gives a grand, panoramic view of the events of the Korean Peninsula in the first half of the 20th century.

Before the war, however, it was home to many hundreds of Westerners who experienced life there under Japanese colonial rule.

Living Dangerously in Korea quantity.

Eastbridge Books March 2003 472 pages. 99 (paperback) ISBN 978-1-910736-69-2. Living Dangerously in Korea quantity.

In addition to writing books and journal articles on a variety of East Asian topics, Professor Clark has also published two works that focus upon Western missionaries in Korea-Living Dangerously in Korea: The Western Experience 1900–1950 (2003) and Missionary Photography.

In addition to writing books and journal articles on a variety of East Asian topics, Professor Clark has also published two works that focus upon Western missionaries in Korea-Living Dangerously in Korea: The Western Experience 1900–1950 (2003) and Missionary Photography in Korea: Encountering the West through Christianity (2009). Professor Clark’s latest publication is a Key Issues in Asian Studies booklet for survey-level univer-sity and advanced high school students titled Korea in World History.

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Missionary Enterprise in Asia.

Abstract As a son and grandson of Presbyterian missionaries who spent his formative years in Korea, Donald Clark i. .

Norwalk, Connecticut: EastBridge, 2003. xiv, 455 pp. Photos, maps, bibliography, index. As a son and grandson of Presbyterian missionaries who spent his formative years in Korea, Donald Clark is well-situated to tell his story: the Western missionary experience in Korea through the first half of the twentieth century. With this in mind, it first bears noting that Clark's formidable work of scholarship is both more and less than its title implies.

Korea was "discovered" by the West after World War II when it became a flashpoint in the Cold War. Before the war, however, it was home to many hundreds of Westerners who experienced life there under Japanese colonial rule. These included missionaries who opened Korea as a field for evangelism, education, and medicine; speculators who risked much and reaped riches from mining concessions; and diplomats who tried to keep them neutral, even as the Japanese forced them out of business on the eve of the Pacific War.

In the first part of the book, the author reconstructs the foreign community and highlights the role of Americans in particular as participants in Korean history, bringing vividly to life the lives and suffering and triumphs of the expatriate community in Korea, especially the missionaries. In the second part of the book, the author presents the altered circumstances of American military occupation after 1945 and the consequences of the Americans’ assuming a role not unlike the one that had been played earlier by the colonial Japanese.

By telling the lives and experiences of Westerners, the author highlights the major historical events of modern Korean history. Accounts of foreigners in the Independence Movement and during the period of militarization in the 1930s shed new light on what Japanese colonial rule meant to the Korean people. Similarly, Western experiences in Korea in the 1940s amount to a commentary on the way Korea was divided and the events that led inexorably to the ordeal of the Korean War.

The stories recounted in this extraordinary book, highlighted by more than sixty photographs, are a valuable commentary on Korea’s early modernization and the consequences of the Korean War as it set the stage for Korea’s relations with the world in the late twentieth century.

  • "Living Dangerously in Korea" by Donald Clark is a well researched and very readable account of a number of outstanding non-Koreans who have lived in that abused nation in the last one hundred plus years under a fading Monarchy and Japanese colonialism and then a struggling re-birth and growth as a painfully severed victim of global jealousies. This transformation from a feudal pre-industrial society to a leading 21st century world figure, virtually in the lifetimes of two generations, was the scene of action of the remarkable characters portrayed. As one who witnessed almost 80 of those years I found this account both informative and enjoyable. For those less knowledgeable, it should provide a real insight to the lives of these self-sacrificing missionaries and the land and people they came to serve and love under changing political, financial and social conditions through the years.

  • This book is by far one of the best, if not THE best, I've read about Korea during the first half of the 1900's. Very interesting, intriguing, and well-documented.

  • I was very satisfied with this transaction. The book arrived promptly and was in even better condition than the shipper's description.

  • The book is an in-depth study of life and times of Westerners in Korea - mainly Christian missionaries, but also diplomats, refugees, military men. Eloquently written, it makes for a great read. I could not put it down until getting to the last page.

    The book begins with a description of adventures of early Christian missionaries, among whom Clark lists his grandfather. It is indeed a moving story of hardship and suffering, of remarkable achievement and loss. The author accounts for miserable conditions of Korea back in the early 1900s, and shows why so many Western missionaries chose to brave the difficulties and make Korea their home.

    The book dwells at length on the Japanese occupation of Korea, brutality and suppression. He notes that whilst many missionaries supported the cause of Korean independence, most chose to keep on good terms with the authorities. At the same time, as the militarist regime grew more oppressive in Korea, many Christian missionaries had to choose between accepting increasing state control of religion and giving up their work by leaving Korea. Clark gives an interesting example of this dilemma in his discussion of the Japanese efforts to force Shinto worship on Koreans.

    The author's main point is to argue that missionaries did much good work for Korea, notwithstanding prejudices and arrogance that was inevitably manifest in the Western community. In a very subtle way he takes an issue with the attempts in modern Korean historiography to depict early Westerners as racist exploiters. At the same time, he does not shun away from the discussion of exploitation and injustice, as in his analysis of the gold mining business in Korea. On the other hand, the author in a few places makes fairly careful references to anti-Western prejudices and bias in Korea itself - too carefully perhaps, because indeed such sentiments bordering on plain racism are often seen in many parts of Asia, not just Korea.

    Korea, which Clark depicts, is long-gone. Seoul is a cosmopolitan hub, one feels here much the same as in any other modern metropolis. The frontier of expat communities moved further into Asia. For instance, when living in Mongolia and Central Asia for several years I witnessed - and was properly disgusted by - self-contained expat communities with much of the colonial mindset so present in the Korean expat community in the early part of the 20th century.

    The author talks about the suffering and deprivation of Korea in war-time (1940s up to the Korean War). It is incredible what many of these Westerners went through, and even more incredible to think that they actually had a good time compared to the vast majority of Koreans. The book leaves a sad impression of modern Korean history, which is simply soaked in blood - and it is probably an accurate impression. Hard to believe this now, looking out the window of the 4th floor of Gwanghwamun Starbucks.

    Good read, highly recommended!