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ePub Daddy Grace: A Celebrity Preacher and His House of Prayer (Religion, Race, and Ethnicity) download

by Marie W. Dallam

ePub Daddy Grace: A Celebrity Preacher and His House of Prayer (Religion, Race, and Ethnicity) download
Author:
Marie W. Dallam
ISBN13:
978-0814720370
ISBN:
0814720374
Language:
Publisher:
NYU Press (April 1, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
World
ePub file:
1242 kb
Fb2 file:
1525 kb
Other formats:
docx lrf rtf txt
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
544

Charles Manuel Sweet Daddy Grace founded the United House of Prayer for All People in Wareham. Dallam has done a great service in providing a detailed scholarly study of ‘Sweet Daddy’ Grace and his church.

Charles Manuel Sweet Daddy Grace founded the United House of Prayer for All People in Wareham. A thoughtful study that should henceforth make it impossible to dismiss Grace as a ‘cult leader’ who had little religious significance in his lifetime or beyond. -Journal of American History. Dallam has made a major contribution to the scholarship and literature on Daddy Grace and the United House of Prayer for All People.

Marie W. Dallam here offers both a religious history of the House of Prayer as an institution and an intellectual history of its colorful and enigmatic leader.

Charles Manuel Sweet Daddy Grace founded the United House of Prayer for All. Marie W. It was assumed by many that Grace was the charismatic glue that held his church together, and that once he was gone the institution would disintegrate.

Charles Manuel Sweet Daddy Grace founded the United House of Prayer for All People in Wareham, Massachusetts, in 1919. This charismatic church has been regarded as one of the most extreme Pentecostal sects in the country. Instead, following his 1960 death there was a period of confusion, restructuring, and streamlining.

Home Browse Books Book details, Daddy Grace: A Celebrity Preacher and His House. Daddy Grace: A Celebrity Preacher and His House of Prayer. Particularly valuable are the connections it draws across his work and the insights which the introduction and glossary provide into the origin and development of some key Gramscian concepts. -Stuart Hall, Professor of Sociology, Open University. The most complete one-volume collection of writings by one of the most fascinating thinkers in the history of Marxism, The Antonio Gramsci Reader fills the need for a broad and general introduction to this major figure.

Dallam addresses the previous documentations of Daddy Grace and his church, United House of Prayer for All People, showing its biased criticism of Grace and then going on to show Grace in a more positive and fairer light. I grew up in a conservative home surrounded by grandparents who were devoutly religious and conservative in every sense of the word, while also being in a town with a population of 98% whites. All the friends that I grew up with were either Catholic, Jewish, or Lutheran like myself. While I had experienced other religions due friends who practiced.

Charles Manuel "Sweet Daddy" Grace founded the United House of Prayer for All People in Wareham, Massachusetts, in 1919.

Under his leadership, the House of Prayer acquired a fleet of luxury coach buses; property was acquired for the House of Prayer for . Retrieved 2010-02-15. a b c d e f g Dallam, Marie W. Daddy Grace: A Celebrity Preacher and His House of Prayer, p. 7,87.

Under his leadership, the House of Prayer acquired a fleet of luxury coach buses; property was acquired for the House of Prayer for use as future development sites; concert and marching bands were organized to march in annual parades and annual competitions; and softball teams were organized, nationwide, for interstate competition. In addition, the McCollough Scholarship Fund was established which allowed.

Negotiating Race, Class, and Gender within the Ummah.

Black Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity in History and Culture. Negotiating Race, Class, and Gender within the Ummah.

Dallam’s expertise is in the area of American religion and culture. One of the recurrent themes in her work is marginalization; more specifically, she is interested in exploring groups that have become religious and cultural outsiders in the United States, whether by choice or default.

The Preacher and His Models (The Yale Lectures on Preaching 1891). Author: Marie Dallam. Books ~~ Religion~~ Christianity ~~ Pentecostal & Charismatic. Title: Daddy Grace: A Celebrity Preacher and His House of Prayer.

Charles Manuel “Sweet Daddy” Grace founded the United House of Prayer for All People in Wareham, Massachusetts, in 1919. This charismatic church has been regarded as one of the most extreme Pentecostal sects in the country. In addition to attention-getting maneuvers such as wearing purple suits with glitzy jewelry, purchasing high profile real estate, and conducting baptisms in city streets with a fire hose, the flamboyant Grace reputedly accepted massive donations from his poverty-stricken followers and used the money to live lavishly. It was assumed by many that Grace was the charismatic glue that held his church together, and that once he was gone the institution would disintegrate. Instead, following his 1960 death there was a period of confusion, restructuring, and streamlining. Today the House of Prayer remains an active church with a national membership in the tens of thousands.

Daddy Grace: A Celebrity Preacher and His House of Prayer seriously examines the religious nature of the House of Prayer, the dimensions of Grace’s leadership strategies, and the connections between his often ostentatious acts and the intentional infrastructure of the House of Prayer. Furthermore, woven through the text are analyses of the race, class, and gender issues manifest in the House of Prayer structure under Grace’s aegis.

Marie W. Dallam here offers both a religious history of the House of Prayer as an institution and an intellectual history of its colorful and enigmatic leader.

  • This was a memorable read for me! Having grown up in Augusta, GA, my paternal grandmother joined the United House of Prayer for all People early in her life and remained a staunch member until her death in 1991 at the age of 92. Saint Andrews occupied an apartment in the rear of the UHOP church in Augusta. She was a mentor of then Elder Bailey (now Bishop and leader of the church).
    Miss Dallam's book is an on target, well thought out representation of a man who was truly before his time and set the bar in the world of evangelical revivalist type leaders. Grace rarely gets his due for achieving success in organizing the often disenfranchised and building a LASTING church. While some ridicule the UHOP for certain practices, considering the humble beginnings,internal conflicts and other issues affecting organized religions,"The House that Daddy Built" is quite intact. Wether or not you're familiar with the era or the man, you'll come away with a better understanding of both.

  • I had heard of this man but knew nothing of his history. Very interesting and informative. Helpful for anyone studying charismatic leaders of any period in time.

  • Hats off to Dr. Marie Dallam for producing the most courageous, scholarly, and surprisingly candid expose on Daddy Grace and the lost and scattered sheep for whom he structured a nurturing apparatus. Her book does not have many significant shortcomings and, given the history of reporting on the subject, it certainly is an excellent positive start. The few faults of the book primarily appear in the form of omissions-apparently due to the author's limited access to information (germane personal information), about her subject. However, the Hebrew lineage of the da Graca (Gracias) clan is an issue to which prime treatment could have been given but was not. That is unfortunate - for therein lay the key to knowledge and understanding of the mission, First Testament bent, and evolving Second Testament theology and doctrine followed by Daddy Grace (the celebrity preacher) and his House of Prayer. Overall, Dr. Dallam did a commendable job in writing this book. My hat goes off to her.
    Malcolm Barksdale

  • Quite a history about a self-made man

  • Good book, didn't really capture the true church and it's faith in God.

  • Excellent study.

  • Quick shipment
    Daddy Grace: A Celebrity Preacher and His House of Prayer (Religion, Race, and Ethnicity)

  • Marie Dallam's book "Daddy Grace: A Celebrity Preacher and his House of Prayer" is an outstanding, well written and well researched book. This is the first objective scholarly analysis of Daddy Grace and the House of Prayer that clearly explains the origins of many of the House of Prayer practices and customs and attempts to delve into who Daddy Grace was as a person.

    It has been over 40 years since the death of Daddy Grace, yet there still many myths and misunderstandings about Daddy Grace and the House of Prayer. Many view Daddy Grace as a cult leader or sometimes confuse him with Father Divine. Dallam clearly and concisely explains why the House of Prayer should not be classified as a cult and explains the distinctions between the House of Prayer and the Church founded by Father Divine.

    For members, this book is a must read, if you want to have a sound understanding of our founding father, the evolution of the House of Prayer, and to become aware of certain organizational areas that need improvement. More importantly, I think the book will help all members understand that we have a rich heritage that we should be proud of and that we must work to continually enhance all aspects of our faith.

    Elder E.C. Smith, Member of the United House of Prayer for All People, Washington, D.C.