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by Ernst Troeltsch

ePub The Social Teaching of the Christian Churches download
Author:
Ernst Troeltsch
ISBN13:
978-0226812984
ISBN:
0226812987
Language:
Publisher:
Univ of Chicago Pr; New edition edition (September 1, 1981)
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Subcategory:
World
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1161 kb
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1815 kb
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4.8
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892

Troeltsch, Ernst, 1865-1923. Church and social problems - History, Church history.

Troeltsch, Ernst, 1865-1923. inlibrary; printdisabled; trent university;. Kahle/Austin Foundation.

Ernst Troeltsch's The Social Teachings explores 'the Christian Ethos in its inward connection with the universal history of civilization'

Ernst Troeltsch's The Social Teachings explores 'the Christian Ethos in its inward connection with the universal history of civilization'. This article attempts to capture the enduring importance of The Social Teachings for anyone interested in theological and ethical reflection on cultural and social life. It argues that in many ways contemporary theological ethics really cannot reject the Troeltschian legacy, even if important and profound revisions in that project are necessary

His "The Social Teachings of the Christian Church" (Die Soziallehren der christlichen Kirchen und Gruppen, 1912) .

His "The Social Teachings of the Christian Church" (Die Soziallehren der christlichen Kirchen und Gruppen, 1912) is a seminal work in theology.

In this landmark work, Ernst Troeltsch offers a history of Christian ethics. This expansive volume relates Christian ethical ideas to the changing structures of church and society from the period of early Christianity to the end of the eighteenth century. Troeltsch's classic work, first published in 1931, continues to speak to the present condition of the church and In this landmark work, Ernst Troeltsch offers a history of Christian ethics

Other articles where The Social Teachings of the Christian Churches is discussed: Ernst Troeltsch: Life and works .

Other articles where The Social Teachings of the Christian Churches is discussed: Ernst Troeltsch: Life and works. is best known work, Die Soziallehren der christlichen Kirchen und Gruppen. In that work he explored the relationships between and within social and cultural groups in the context of the social ethics of the Christian churches, denominations, and sects. In 1915, realizing that his strength lay more in the philosophy.

This unsurpassed classic is more than a history of Christian ethical ideas

This unsurpassed classic is more than a history of Christian ethical ideas. It comes near to being a history of the Christian era, for it relates these ideas to the changing structures of church and society, showing the mutual influences between ideas, social forces, and institutions. -James Luther Adams, Edward Mallinckrodg, J. The Divinity School, Harvard University.

Complete summary of Ernst Troeltsch's The Social Teaching of the Christian Churches. Ernst Troeltsch belonged to a pioneering generation of German social thinkers who studied value conflict in the formation of social and cultural unity. eNotes plot summaries cover all the significant action of The Social Teaching of the Christian Churches.

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Are you sure you want to remove The social teaching of the Christian churches from your list? The social teaching of the Christian churches.

Ernst Troeltsch's The Social Teachings explores ‘the Christian Ethos in its inward connection with the universal history of civilization’

Ernst Troeltsch's The Social Teachings explores ‘the Christian Ethos in its inward connection with the universal history of civilization’. It argues that in many ways contemporary theological ethics really cannot reject the Troeltschian legacy, even if important and profound revisions in that project are necessary.

Ernst Troeltsch, Olive Wyon. Ernst Troeltsch's Essay on "Socialism". Dennis P. McCann & Ernst Troeltsch - 1976 - Journal of Religious Ethics 4 (1):159 - 180. Ethics 42 (4):473- (1932). Revelation and Reason: The Christian Doctrine of Faith and Knowledge. By Emil Brunner; Translated by Olive Wyon. London, Student Christian Movement Press Ltd. 1947.

  • “The fundamental idea underlying the preaching of Jesus is easy to discern. It deals with the proclamation of the great final judgement of the coming of the ‘Kingdom of God’, by which is meant that state of life in which god will have supreme control, when his Will will be done on earth; in this ‘Kingdom’ sin, suffering and pain will have been overcome, and the true spiritual values, combined with single eyed devotion to the Will of God, will shine out in the glory that is their due.’’ (51)

    Who will benefit?

    “That is why sinful men who acknowledge their sinfulness, and those who have learned the lessons of submission and humility through their experience of sorrow and poverty, will enter the kingdom of god before the self-satisfied and the righteous as well as before the rich and the great ones of the earth.’’ (51)

    Troeltsch writing on the ‘social teaching of Christianity’. This work traces the development of social, cultural, institutional Christianity from Jesus time to 1911, when Troeltsch penned his book. He shrewdly starts with the gospel narrative.

    What does he conclude?

    “The message of Jesus also deals with the formation of the community based on the hope of the kingdom, which in the meantime, possesses both the pledge of the Kingdom and the preparation for its coming in Jesus Himself. This community is to be founded by the missionary efforts of the narrower circle of the immediate disciples and followers of Jesus; they therefore are entrusted with the special duties which devolve upon the heralds of the Kingdom. With there help the Kingdom is preached everywhere.’’ (51)

    What message?

    “The Kingdom of God means the rule of God on earth, to be followed, later on, by the end of the world and the Judgement. . . . There is no desire to organize a special group of chosen souls; the way that leads to salvation, and the rock on which to build, is to be made plain to as may as possible.’’ (52)

    What is the foundation for the moral, ethical, legal structure?

    “The moral Commandments themselves are conceived from the point of view of ordinary practice and general human interest, but they are illuminated by the fact that as they are obeyed with devotion and inner simplicity, all that is done takes place under the eye of god, which penetrates every disguise and tests human motives to the utmost; thus the will is given to god in absolute obedience, in order that it may attain the real and true life, its real spiritual eternal value in the sight of god.’’ (52)

    I find Troelsch tremendously insightful. He clearly read, meditated, analyzed, the gospel account without preconceptions.

    Fascinating that this two volume work is accepted by scholars as definitive.

    Wow!

    Introduction and preliminary questions of method
    Chapter 1

    1 The foundations in the early church
    - most primitive form of Christianity independent of all direct influences from the social movements of late antiquity and of the imperial period
    - indirect connection with social history
    - the main ethical idea in the message of Jesus
    - parallel religious and sociological development among the stoics

    2 - Paul
    - the rise of a new religious community and its sociological effects
    - attitude to the family, the State, Society, Economics
    - conservative and revolutionary elements within the new religious community

    3 - Early Catholicism
    - the consequent separation of the Church and the world
    - the ethic of the Church which was developed out of this opposition between the Church and the world, and how it bridged the gulf
    - science and the reception of the stoic ethic
    - decisive significance of the ‘Lex Naturae’ for the whole ethic of Christian civilization

    Troelsch analyzes Christian History with the modern world in mind. For example, individual liberty vs group control; communism of love ( Acts chapter six) - voluntary, and forced communism by authority - involuntary.

    Troelsch includes a footnote this observation:

    “This imitation of Christ runs parallel with the lessening of emphasis upon the dogma of the God-Man [trinity]. In fact the latter dogma removes the ethic of Jesus out of the region of comparison altogether, pointing rather to obedience to the Church.’’ (63)

    This insight explains one cause of the emotional drive to promote and defend Jesus status as God and not man. If he was God on earth, obviously Christians cannot even try to copy a god. However, if he was just a very good, even perfect human, the demand to apply his example at all times becomes . . . overwhelming.

    Which is easier, more comfortable?

    Troelsch writing for scholars, his fellow academics. Not obscure or difficult, but detailed, through and analytical. Reader will need serious interest in Christian, European, historical development. Especially religious, cultural, intellectual history.

    From the foward . . .

    “Troelsch continues to attract serious and devoted readers not only in Germany but throughout the English-speaking world. . . . Troelsch, along with his colleague Max Weber, was of course a major originator and definer of the discipline of the sociology of religion.

  • It's always great buy on Amazon.

  • Ernst Troeltsch (1865-1923) was a German Protestant theologian who taught at the University of Bonn, then Heidelberg University, and finally the Humboldt University of Berlin. He wrote books such as Protestantism and Progress: A Historical Study of the Relation of Protestantism to the Modern World and Religion in History. The companion volume is The Social Teaching of the Christian Churches Vol 1.

    He turns to Protestantism, and observes, “When [Luther] is confronted with the question of a non-Protestant Government he feels it needful to organize a body which shall be entirely independent of the State; when this happens he emphasizes the fact that the secular power must not interfere in spiritual matters. The result of these ideas is obvious: if universal order is not affected by the Empire or by a Council, and if the expectation of the approaching End of the World which is rife amid all this confusion is also not fulfilled, it then becomes the duty of the laith, and especially of the rulers, to help the Word of God to have free course… a demand which was entirely in accord with the whole previous outlook of Christian Society.” (Pg. 480)

    He summarizes, “Protestantism carries forward the acceptance of the life of the world into the ethic of a universal Christian Society… and it intensifies this principle to the highest possible degree. Since Protestantism is a renewal of the primitive Christian religious spirit, its greatest difficulty arose, primarily, at this point. In the endeavor to deal with this problem through the formation of small communities within external Christendom, and in the distinction it draws between the personal spiritual ethic and secular official morality, it approaches the sect-type, which also in reality springs out of Protestantism at this point. Since, however, on the other hand, Protestantism maintains the ideal of a pure institution of grace which comprehends the whole of Society, and the unity of the Christian Society, it rejects the sect-type as the tendency towards legalism and loveless division. This rejection of the sect-type led Protestantism to an ever-increasing recognition of the life of the world and or the morality of the world.” (Pg. 511-512)

    He notes, “in itself the late Medieval tendency in the development of the State and the general social classification was not altered by Lutheranism. The only changes were the disappearance of the priesthood, which was replaced by the Protestant ministry, as well as the abolition of the supreme control by the Church, and the establishment of the system of purely State control which took its place; the process of secularization and the abolition of monasticism which also changes which cut deeply into the social fabric, but they did not initiate new social developments. The social fabric was more profoundly affected by the rise of a Humanistic educated class, which was encouraged by the didactic character of the new religion, and its close connection with education; yet this was rather an effect of Humanism combined with the Reform Movement than an effect produced by the religious spirit itself.” (Pg. 572)

    He explains, “In Calvinism this idea of the ‘Corpus Christianum’ is regarded as the union of the Government which discerns its duties---both from the point of view of Christian and of Natural Law---in reason and in the Bible, and the active independent Church, which administers its own law of Divine justice for the Christianizing of Society, and also works with the State in the spirit of a common obedience to the Word of God. It is a uniform system of life and of Society as a whole, inspired by one common ideal in things secular and sacred, which therefore possesses a comprehensive sociological fundamental theory, developed by the very same methods used by Catholicism and Lutheranism to achieve the same end.” (Pg. 617)

    Of the Anabaptists, he comments, “The distinctive sociological peculiarities of this kind of ‘spiritual religion’ are also manifest. Mysticism is a radical individualism, very different from that of the sect. While the sect separates individuals from the world by its conscious hostility to ‘worldliness’ and by its ethical severity, binding them together in a voluntary fellowship, established upon mutual control and penitential discipline, laying upon individuals the obligation to follow the example and submit to the authority of Christ, increasing individualism by placing it within the mutual influence of group-fellowship and worship---mysticism lays no stress at all upon the relation between individuals, but only upon the relations between the soul and God. It regards the historical, authoritative, and ritual elements in religion merely as methods of quickening the religious sense with which, in case of need, it can dispense altogether. ‘Spiritual religion,’ in particular, in its intense emphasis upon ‘first-hand experience,’ actually tends to sweep away the historical element altogether, and in so doing eliminates the only center around which a Christian cult can be formed.” (Pg. 743)

    He recapitulates, “Our inquiry began with the social and ethical tasks and possibilities of Christianity at the present day. It then reverted to the point at which the form in which the social development of the religious idea was expressed, severed in its connection with the secular social formations. It discovered that these connections take very different forms, according to the special conception of the Christian idea, and of the organization which corresponds to this conception. Our inquiry then traced the course of development of the different church and group formations, and of the social ethic which corresponded in each case to this development. It was finally confronted with the tact that all these social developments were determined by the general conditions of civilization, and in every instance the question had to be asked: At any given time, what was the relationship between the two forms of influence, and how did they mutually react upon one another? Thus we find that the results of this inquiry are connected with the whole conception of the nature and history of Christianity in general.” (Pg. 992-993)

    He says, “Today, therefore, the main problem of the Christian Ethos is still the problem of supernaturalism, and of its unavoidable result, asceticism, in the metaphysical-dualistic or in the disciplinary rigorist sense, and ascetism which is never merely a simple denial of the world and of self. On the other hand, its second main problem is how to supplement this religious onesidedness with an ethic of civilization which can be combined with it. The Church effected this supplement by drawing on the philosophy of late antiquity, and incorporating into its own ethic the idea of the moral Law of Nature. When the sect gave of this idea… it became uncultured and insignificant, while mysticism became complete and solitary resignation… Today, however… these supplementary movements have become impossible. A new supplementary process, therefore, is necessary. In a permanent world the Christian Ethos cannot live and be entirely self-sufficing. The question is simply this: How can this supplement be shaped today?” (Pg. 1001-1002)

    He concludes, “our inquiry leads to the conclusion that all Christian-Social work is in a problematic condition. It is problematic in general because the power of thought to overcome brutal reality is always an obscure and difficult question; it is problematic in particular because the main historical forms of the Christian doctrine of society and of social development are today, for various reasons, impotent in face of the tasks by which they are confronted… One of the most serious and important truths which emerge as a result of this inquiry is this: every idea is still faced by brutal facts, and all upward movement is checked and hindered by interior and exterior difficulties. Nowhere does there exist an absolute Christian ethic, which only awaits discovery; all that we can do is learn to control the world-situation in its successive phases just as the earlier Christian ethic did in its own way… Thus the Christian ethic of the present day and of the future will also only be an adjustment to the world-situation, and it will only be an adjustment to the world-situation, and it will only desire to achieve that which is practically possible… Faith is the source of energy in the struggle of life, but life still remains a battle which is continually renewed upon ever new fronts…. The truth is---and this is the conclusion of the whole matter---the Kingdom of God is within us. But we must let our light shine before men in confident and untiring labor that they may see our good works and praise our Father in Heaven. The final ends of all humanity are hidden within His hands.” (Pg. 1012-1013)

    This is an important work of early 20th century theology, and will be of interest to those studying such theology.

  • The work of one of the great minds of the twentieth century, this unsurpassed classic is more than a history of Christian ethical ideas. It comes near to being a history of the Christian era, for it relates these ideas to the changing structures of church and society, showing the mutual influences between ideas, social forces, and institutions. In a critical and creative way it has advanced the methods of theological and sociological analysis and synthesis. At the same time the work is more than a history, for it speaks to the present condition of the churches and the culture. This two-volume document is as substantial and original as anything that exists on the topic. It reaches from the period of early Christianity to the end of the eighteenth century when "the main body of Protestant civilization was founded and evolved." The extensive footnotes alone virtually amount to a liberal education.