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ePub Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece download

by Joan Breton Connelly

ePub Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece download
Author:
Joan Breton Connelly
ISBN13:
978-0691127460
ISBN:
0691127468
Language:
Publisher:
Princeton University Press (February 25, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
World
ePub file:
1328 kb
Fb2 file:
1215 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
881

Until Joan Breton Connelly's wonderful volume, Portrait of a Priestess, was published the prominent role of Greek . Connelly's brave effort is a long time in the making and deserves to be taken seriously

Her compelling book challenges our assumptions about the role of priestesses, and more generally the role of women, in a far-off world that retains the fascination of countless readers. Connelly's brave effort is a long time in the making and deserves to be taken seriously. For one thing, the book is substantial in length and assembles a rich body of documentation, much of it epigraphical and unfamiliar to many archaeologists and art historians.

A scholar finds that in ancient Greece, religion meant power for women. These are just some of the influential women visible through the cracks of conventional history in Joan Breton Connelly’s eye-opening Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece. Her portrait is not in fact that of an individual priestess, but of a formidable class of women scattered over the Greek world and across a thousand years of history, down to the day in . 393 when the Christian emperor Theodosius banned the polytheistic cults.

Portrait of a Priestess book. In this sumptuously illustrated book, Joan Breton Connelly gives us the first comprehensive cultural history of priestesses in the ancient Greek world

Portrait of a Priestess book. In this sumptuously illustrated book, Joan Breton Connelly. In this sumptuously illustrated book, Joan Breton Connelly gives us the first comprehensive cultural history of priestesses in the ancient Greek world. Connelly presents the fullest and most vivid picture yet of how priestesses lived and worked, from the most famous and sacred of them-the Delphic Oracle and the priestess of Athena Polias-to basket bearers and In this sumptuously illustrated book, Joan Breton Connelly gives us the first comprehensive cultural history of priestesses in the ancient Greek world.

Joan Breton Connelly is an American classical archaeologist and Professor of Classics and Art History at New York University In her Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece, Connelly challenges long held beliefs concerning the "invisibility" of women in ancient.

Joan Breton Connelly is an American classical archaeologist and Professor of Classics and Art History at New York University. She is Director of the Yeronisos Island Excavations and Field School in Cyprus. Connelly was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship in 1996. In her Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece, Connelly challenges long held beliefs concerning the "invisibility" of women in ancient Greece and brings together far-flung archaeological evidence for women's leadership roles in the religious life of the city. Portrait of a Priestess was named as one of the 100 Notable.

In this sumptuously illustrated book, Joan Breton Connelly gives us the first comprehensive cultural history of priestesses in the ancient Greek world. Connelly presents the fullest and most vivid picture yet of how priestesses lived and worked, from the most famous and sacred of them-the Delphic Oracle and the priestess of Athena Polias-to basket bearers and handmaidens. Along the way, she challenges long-held beliefs to show that priestesses played far more significant public roles in ancient Greece than previously acknowledged. Joan Breton Connelly.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 365-381) and indexes. 365-381) and indexes

By Joan Breton Connelly. As scholars of women in antiquity have long recognized, religious rituals provided women with a critical public role in ancient Greece, challenging the popular notion that proper women in Greek society were to be neither seen nor heard.

By Joan Breton Connelly. Connelly’s book provides significant new evidence for the importance of women’s leadership in Greek cult. Her work follows the approach of Lewis’ The Athenian Woman (London and New York 2002) in emphasizing the value of the visual record to supplement and correct ideas regarding women in antiquity derived primarily from literary and epigraphic sources.

10 famous Red-figure pottery of Ancient Greek Ancient Greek vases have been found in the 2nd century . right until the end of the 1st century . when Greek pottery used to be traded from one region of Greece to the other. At first, various local designs in vase painting prospered, however toward the middl. olly gemma. Greek Drawing Ancient Greek Art Ancient Greece Greek Pottery Dionysus Pottery Designs Trojan Horse Erotic Art Romans. III Simpósio de Internacional OUSIA de estudos Classicos.

Joan Breton Connelly is a classical archaeologist who has excavated throughout Greece, Kuwait, and Cyprus where, since 1990, she . Her Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece, was also named a Notable Books of the Year by the New York Times.

She majored in Classics at Princeton University and received her PhD in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology at Bryn Mawr College where she later served as Assistant Dean and as a member of the Board of Trustees. She is an honorary citizen of Peyia Municipality, Cyprus.

Joan Breton Connelly. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2007. Portrait of a Priestess is an impressively long book. It is beautifully produced, including 27 color plates before the introduction, and a generous number of black and white illustrations spaced throughout the text

Joan Breton Connelly. Ancient religion is an attractive, if difficult subject. It is beautifully produced, including 27 color plates before the introduction, and a generous number of black and white illustrations spaced throughout the text. It is also affordable and easy to use, but the book anticipates a specialist, scholarly readership. Following the lengthy introductory chapter are seven more dealing with evidence for Greek and Roman priestesses directly.

In this sumptuously illustrated book, Joan Breton Connelly gives us the first comprehensive cultural history of priestesses in the ancient Greek world. Connelly presents the fullest and most vivid picture yet of how priestesses lived and worked, from the most famous and sacred of them--the Delphic Oracle and the priestess of Athena Polias--to basket bearers and handmaidens. Along the way, she challenges long-held beliefs to show that priestesses played far more significant public roles in ancient Greece than previously acknowledged.

Connelly builds this history through a pioneering examination of archaeological evidence in the broader context of literary sources, inscriptions, sculpture, and vase painting. Ranging from southern Italy to Asia Minor, and from the late Bronze Age to the fifth century A.D., she brings the priestesses to life--their social origins, how they progressed through many sacred roles on the path to priesthood, and even how they dressed. She sheds light on the rituals they performed, the political power they wielded, their systems of patronage and compensation, and how they were honored, including in death. Connelly shows that understanding the complexity of priestesses' lives requires us to look past the simple lines we draw today between public and private, sacred and secular.

The remarkable picture that emerges reveals that women in religious office were not as secluded and marginalized as we have thought--that religious office was one arena in ancient Greece where women enjoyed privileges and authority comparable to that of men. Connelly concludes by examining women's roles in early Christianity, taking on the larger issue of the exclusion of women from the Christian priesthood. This paperback edition includes additional maps and a glossary for student use.

  • I was very excited to receive this book and it appears to be filled with much valuable and fascinating information, well-written in an accessible manner that avoids much of the writing style typical to academia. However I may never actually know what's in this book as it is printed in grey text on glossy paper in small type, making it very difficult to read and after fifteen - twenty minutes my eyes (usually very strong) are strained. I don't understand the reasoning behind presenting a valuable research work as a coffee-table book, but I'm not in publishing. I do know much of what a reader could gain from this book can be overshadowed by the mere attempt of reading. Very disappointed. I make a point of reading every item on my bookshelf so this volume will end up.....donated?

  • Connelly is clear and methodical in her presentation, and inspired and interesting as well! Picking up the torch from the previous generation of feminist scholars, this has no weaknesses in rigour. And it brings to light much that is new and necessary to hear.

  • The status of women in the ancient world has long been a controversial issue. The traditional view of male historians has been that it was always a male-dominated world. Some feminists have countered this with arguing, on rather fragile evidence, in favor of prehistoric matriarchy and mother goddesses and so forth. Ancient Greece, in particular, has always been a kind of blank screen on which thinkers project their own image of what it was like. Most of the written evidence has suggested that women in ancient Greece were subordinate and secluded. Against this has been the fact that some powerful Greek gods were female and served by female priests. What these priestesses did,, and what their place was in society, has been somewhat mysterious because what we got from the historians and poets and playwrights was scanty. Connelly supplements this by a careful and scholarly (perhaps too scholarly for the general reader) examination of epigraphs and images.
    The text is pretty hard going for the non-specialist but the pictures are great and it will make a handsome addition to a feminist coffee table although it will be a shame if it stays there. I think the large format is justified on more than esthetic grounds because Connolly's argument depends on her ability to bring to bear on the subject her abilities as an art historian and therefore adequate illustrations are needed. These are more than adequate; they are magnificent. It would be presumptuous to pronounce on the strength of her case without more expert knowledge than mine. No doubt other academics will be on the attack and it will be fun to see the fur fly in the Times Literary Supplement etc.
    At the risk of quibbling I must break a lance in my ongoing battle against publishers who transcribe Greek inscriptions into lower case. Greek lower case was unknown before the Byzantines. I noticed that she does not mention the triple bronze serpent in the Hippodrome at Istanbul in her discussion of the Pythian oracle at Delphi. Is it authentic?

  • Good solid information! It was helpful in building my knowledge of how women were treated in the ancient world.

  • A wonderfully rich and well-researched volume for those interested in this topic. The many images of ancient ceramic and statuary objects provides a powerful visual complement to the narrative

  • A splendid book painting the picture of life in ancient Greece for the priestess. Giving documentary and pictographic evidence of the history of priestesses it comprehensively describes the life and work of the priestesses. An excellent book for both the student and the casual reader

  • I am glad to see this subject matter written about. I have not read every single word but have read what I was most interested in. It takes a little bit for someone to "wrap their minds" around this time frame.

  • This is a scholarly, and interesting, book about the positions women could hold in ancient Greece. Contrary to those usual shibboleths that women were second class citizens and could be neither seen nor heard , the reverse is true. There were positions of influence, and some power, that were open to them as priestesses or servants of the gods at different stages in their lives from childhood on to old age.. Few of them required chastity, and those that did, only for the brief tenure of their service. No Vestal Virgins here! Their entrees into these positions were peculiarly modern; family and money. Some were chosen by lot and others by appointment. Age determined their position and some were active as prepubescents, others in dignified old age. The author's list of sources for her information is impressive, and while a familiarity with ancient Greek would be an advantage, she helps those of us who aren't with translations. Beautiful and plentiful illustrations.