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by David Lorton,Claude Traunecker

ePub The Gods of Egypt download
Author:
David Lorton,Claude Traunecker
ISBN13:
978-0801438349
ISBN:
0801438349
Language:
Publisher:
Cornell University Press (June 28, 2001)
Category:
Subcategory:
World
ePub file:
1793 kb
Fb2 file:
1454 kb
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
437

David Lorton, an Egyptologist, is the translator of many books, including Erik Hornung's books The Secret Lore of Egypt and Akhenaten and the Religion of Light, both from Cornell.

The Gods of Egypt (Hardback). Claude Traunecker (author), David Lorton (translator). The clarity and brevity of Claude Traunecker's book make it especially valuable to readers seeking an authoritative introduction to this complex topic

The Gods of Egypt (Hardback). The clarity and brevity of Claude Traunecker's book make it especially valuable to readers seeking an authoritative introduction to this complex topic. Traunecker begins with an overview of the source materials and a discussion of the historiography of Egyptian religion, a subject relatively neglected by scholars. He then describes the actual and metaphysical worlds inhabited by the Egyptian deities and the role that humans played in the Egyptian universe.

The Gods of Egypt, first published in France in 1992 and now in its third French .

Claude Traunecker, one of the world's foremost authorities on ancient Egyptian religion, is director of the Institut d'Egyptologie at the University of Strasbourg. He is the author of Coptos: Hommes et dieux sur le parvis de Geb and coauthor of Karnak: Rèsurrection d'un site and Le Caire. David Lorton, an Egyptologist, has translated other Cornell books, including The Twilight of Ancient Egypt: First Millennium .

by. Traunecker, Claude.

Find sources: "Claude Traunecker" – news · newspapers · books · scholar .

Find sources: "Claude Traunecker" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (January 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). From 1968 to 1984, Traunecker worked in Franco-Egyptian Center for the Study of Temples Karnak and Luxor References.

Lorton, Claude Traunecker (2001). The gods of Egypt (translation from the French by David e. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press. ISBN 978-0-8014-3834-9. Zecchi, Marco (2001).

One of the oldest legends of our culture dates back to the era before the Libyan dynasties of Egypt, many centuries before the Christian era. It relates to the town of Sais, in the delta of the Nile, where a great temple had been dedicated to Osiris, the god of the underworld. The ruins of that temple are still visible today. Osiris: Death and Afterlife of a God. February 2008. Bojana Mojsov tells the story of the cult of Osiris from beginning to end, sketching its development throughout 3,000 years of Egyptian history.

The official reopening was attended by notable officials from Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities and by other . Traunecker, Claude & Lorton, David The Gods of Egypt, Translated by David Lorton, Cornell University Press, 2001, ISBN 0-8014-3834-9, ISBN 978-0-8014-3834-9

The official reopening was attended by notable officials from Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities and by other archaeologists working in the area, among them Francesco Tiradritti  . Traunecker, Claude & Lorton, David The Gods of Egypt, Translated by David Lorton, Cornell University Press, 2001, ISBN 0-8014-3834-9, ISBN 978-0-8014-3834-9.

Runia, David T. 1988. God and Man in Philo of Alexandria. The Quest of the Historical Jesus, trans. The Gods of Egypt, trans. Cornell University Press. In David T. Runia (1990), Exegesis and Philosophy.

The Gods of Egypt, first published in France in 1992 and now in its third French edition, is a short, elegant, and highly accessible survey of ancient Egyptian religion. The clarity and brevity of Claude Traunecker's book make it especially valuable to readers seeking an authoritative introduction to this complex topic. The Cornell edition, the first English translation, is enhanced by 23 illustrations. Traunecker begins with an overview of the source materials and a discussion of the historiography of Egyptian religion, a subject relatively neglected by scholars. He then describes the actual and metaphysical worlds inhabited by the Egyptian deities and the role that humans played in the Egyptian universe. Focusing especially on the diversity and number of approaches used by Egyptians to explain their world, The Gods of Egypt offers a succinct and highly readable presentation of recent interpretations of Egyptian religion.
  • Very interesting fitting and in good condition

  • In this book, which is apparently a revision or replacement of a 1960s book by François Daumas, Traunecker provides sort of a middle ground in French treatments of Egyptian deities: breezier than Gods and Men in Egypt, less flamboyant than Daily Life of the Egyptian Gods. The first chapter discusses the sources that we use to understand Egyptian beliefs and gives a short description of how that understanding has evolved over the centuries. Traunecker makes clear a couple of points that I frequently harp on myself: that 19th and early 20th-century scholars aren't good sources on Egyptian religion, and that modern understanding of the subject began with Henri Frankfort. The next several chapters discuss the Egyptian conception of the world, the nature of the gods and the forms they were believed to take, the "society" formed by the gods' relationships to each other, and how they functioned within the cosmos. The next chapter briefly describes how the gods were thought to interact with humans, and the last chapter discusses deities' geographical spheres of influence, including the relationship between certain gods and lands outside Egypt. In a few places, Traunecker relates anecdotes about the deities that don't often show up in other sources. This book isn't as complete in its coverage as several others on the subject, but it's both thoughtful and readable.

  • I have always considered Traunecker's work to be of the highest quality. He has an insight into the mechanics of ancient Egyptian cosmologies, theologies, and mythologies that is both direct and free of unnecessary random (and rambling) thought. His assessments are clinical but always interesting, and his work on the El Qa'la temple site is NOT to be missed by anyone who can get their hands on IFAO's pub. Be that as it may, this short book packs a scholarly punch. All of Traunecker's hard-earned, on-site assessments of the gods of ancient Egypt -- their cults, qualities, relevance, and destinies -- can be found in rather tidy, enlightening fashion. A must-have quick reference for many of its tidbits...though Dr. Traunecker does contradict at least one or two minor points he previously asserted in some of his published work. Bottom line -- Immortals (and Immortalettes) of Ancient Egypt from one of the best pros in the business! Get it.