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ePub A Second Exodus: The American Movement to Free Soviet Jews (Brandeis Series in American Jewish History, Culture, and Life) download

by Murray Friedman,Albert D. Chernin

ePub A Second Exodus: The American Movement to Free Soviet Jews (Brandeis Series in American Jewish History, Culture, and Life) download
Author:
Murray Friedman,Albert D. Chernin
ISBN13:
978-0874519129
ISBN:
0874519128
Language:
Publisher:
Brandeis University Press; 1 edition (May 1, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
World
ePub file:
1906 kb
Fb2 file:
1297 kb
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
758

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Since the early 1960s, some . million Jews from the Soviet Union and its successor states have immigrated to the West. The book is a collection of essays by individuals who were deeply involved in the process that resulted in the resettlemnt of over 1 million Soviet Jews in israel, the . The Soviet Jewry movement also changed the face of Jewish activism in the . and brought to light the many different approaches to a controversial and tragic situation.

A Second Exodus book. A collection of articles on the Soviet Jewry movement, its history and programs. Very well-written and the cast of authors is quite impressive. Start by marking A Second Exodus: The American Movement to Free Soviet Jews as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by Murray Friedman. This seems to have been the first post-Cold War book on the advocacy movement.

Murray Friedman, Albert D. Chernin, ed. In total nearly . million Jews fled the Soviet Union between 1968 and 1994. Chernin, eds. A Second Exodus: The American Movement to Free Soviet Jews. Between 1988 and 1994, 776,867 legal emigrants left the Soviet Union, including almost 200,000 Jews who settled in the United States, and nearly 500,000 who settled in Israel, adding to the more than 200,000 Jews who made it to Israel in the two decades prior to 1988.

Yet for most American Jews .

Yet for most American Jews, the notion that an ongoing protest campaign could be organized for a Jewish cause was foreign, even vaguely threatening. Orbach, American Movement, p. 20. During this time, independent initiatives were also launched by American Jews frustrated by the establishment’s lethargy. For a vigorous defense of the Conference, see Albert D. Chernin, Making Soviet Jews an Issue: A History, in Murray Friedman and Albert D. A Second Exodus: The American Movement to Free Soviet Jews (Hanover, . Brandeis, 1999), pp. 15-69.

Throughout the timeline of the movement to free Jews from the USSR – 1964 – 1991 – tensions existed between the Jewish Establishment groups . Eds. Murray Friedman and Albert D. Chernin

Throughout the timeline of the movement to free Jews from the USSR – 1964 – 1991 – tensions existed between the Jewish Establishment groups, represented by the umbrella organization the American Jewish Conference on Soviet Jewry and its successor the National Conference on Soviet Jewry. Differences revolved around policy and action. Behind the scenes, the clandestine Israeli Soviet Jewry office, Nativ (known as the Lishka), supported the ACSJ and NCSJ, which it had helped create. Chernin. University Press of New England, 1999.

A Second Exodus The American Movement to Free Soviet Jews A first-time chronicle of the US Soviet Jewry Movement. Friedman, Murray, and Albert D. Sephardic-American Voices Two Hundred Years of a Literary Legacy A groundbreaking literary anthology reveals the nature and history of a lesser-known but vital branch of Jewish culture. Matza, Diane, ed. Shul with a Pool The Synagogue-Center in American Jewish History The evolution of an American institution that reflects the unique tension between Judaism and Jewishness.

which modern American Jewish life would subsequently be built. Albert D. Chernin and Murray Friedman-Ed. They included, among others, the American Jewish Committee, the rejuvenated Jewish Publication Society, and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. The Feinstein Center focused attention on the movement in a conference of activists and scholars in New York City that yielded another collection of papers, A Second Exodus: The American Movement to Free Soviet Jews (1999). A subsequent volume by Andrew Harrison, Passover Revisited (2000), focused on efforts in Philadelphia to assist Soviet Jews between 1963 and 1998.

Gilbert, Martin, Shcharansky, Hero of Our Time, London, Macmillan London Limited, 1986

Gilbert, Martin, Shcharansky, Hero of Our Time, London, Macmillan London Limited, 1986. Levin, Nora, The Jews in the Soviet Union since 1917, Paradox of Survival, Volume I, Volume II, New York and London, New York University Press, 1988. Prital David, Jews of the FSU in Israel and Diaspora. Soviet Jewish Affairs, Chronicle of Events, Sources are Western press reports, unless specifically stated. Rosenfeld, Nancy Unfinished Journey.

See Orbach, The American Movement to Aid Soviet Jews, 1.

See Orbach, The American Movement to Aid Soviet Jews, 18. 21. On the AJCSJ, see Frey, Challenging the World's Conscience, 77–80; Lazin, The Struggle for Soviet Jewry in American Politics, 28–30; Orbach, The American Movement to Aid Soviet Jews, 24–27; and Ro’i, The Struggle for Soviet Jewish Emigration, 193–202. It appeared originally in Hebrew as a series of articles in the Israeli daily Yediot Aharonot. Friedman, and Chernin,, 181–99; Lazin, The Struggle for Soviet Jewry in American Politics; Micah Naftalin, The Activist Movement, in A Second Exodus, ed.

Since the early 1960s, some 1.3 million Jews from the Soviet Union and its successor states have immigrated to the West, primarily to Israel and the US. Largely due to the imaginative and skillful mobilization efforts of Jews and their friends throughout the world, this great exodus had important ramifications for US relations with the Soviet Union/Russia and Israel. In addition, the success of American Jews in mounting and sustaining this lobbying effort represented a coming of age for the community, which only a few decades before had been unable to extricate millions of Jews from Europe and the Nazis. This book, part history, part celebration, combines essays by scholars with memoirs and first-hand accounts to chronicle this extraordinary rescue mission. CONTRIBUTORS: Zvi Gitelman, Marshall I. Goldman, Douglas Kahn, William Korey, Nehemiah Levanon, Micah H. Naftalin, Walter Ruby, Richard Schifter, Myrna Shinbaum, Steven F. Windmueller, and the editors