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ePub The First Crusade: A New History download

by Thomas Asbridge

ePub The First Crusade: A New History download
Author:
Thomas Asbridge
ISBN13:
978-0195189056
ISBN:
0195189051
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (September 29, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
World
ePub file:
1609 kb
Fb2 file:
1217 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
125

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The First Crusade book.

Thomas Asbridge's new history, The First Crusade, is a breath of fresh air. Few topics in history have been as mistreated and misused as the Crusades, giving rise to a great deal of popular rhetoric that has all but obscured the actual events themselves. Asbridge's book, however, cuts through the great majority of the myths and confronts the reader with real 11th-century men with real 11th-century concerns and beliefs.

Originally published: London : Free Press, 2004. Includes bibliographical references (p. -396) and index

Originally published: London : Free Press, 2004. -396) and index. Holy war proclaimed - Afire with crusading fever - The journey to Byzantium - The first storm of war - Before the walls of Antioch - Tightening the screw - To the edge of annihilation - Descent into discord - The faltering faith - The holy city - Aftermath. In 1095, Pope Urban II delivered an electrifying speech that launched the First Crusade.

Thomas Scott Asbridge is a medieval history scholar at Queen Mary University of London and has been since 1999. He is the author of The First Crusade: A New History (2004), a book which describes the background, events, and consequences of the First Crusade, as well as of The Crusades: The War for the Holy Land (2010), a volume providing a view on the crusading movement, portraying the ideas of justified violence and jihad.

Thomas Asbridge is a Reader in Medieval History at Queen Mary University in London, and an internationally renowned expert .

Thomas Asbridge is a Reader in Medieval History at Queen Mary University in London, and an internationally renowned expert on the history of the Crusades. He has written and presented a major BBC TV series on the Crusades and a documentary on William Marshal. Библиографические данные. The First Crusade: A New History. Издание: перепечатанное.

Thomas Asbridge is Lecturer in Early Medieval History at Queen Mary, University of London.

Publication Date - October 2004. 448 pages Hardcover 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches. Thomas Asbridge is Lecturer in Early Medieval History at Queen Mary, University of London. An acknowledged expert on the history of the Crusades, he has traveled extensively in the Near East following the route of the First Crusade. -The Herald (Glasgow). Asbridge achieves vivid characterization and gripping storytelling without sacrifice of scholarship.

The First Crusade Thomas Asbridge Free Press (2005) Tags: Non Fiction, History Non Fictionttt Historyttt .. No reproduction without permission. The Free Press and colophon are trademarks of Simon & Schuster, Inc.

Beginning with the electrifying speech delivered by Pope Urban II on the last Tuesday of November in the year 1095, readers will follow the more than 100,000 men who took up the call from their mobilization in Europe (where great waves of anti-Semitism resulted in the deaths of thousands of Jews), to their arrival in Constanstinople, an exotic, opulent.

Nine hundred years ago the Pope initiated one of the most controversial episodes in Christian history by stating that God wanted European knights to wage a fierce and bloody war against Islam and recapture Jerusalem. Thus was the First Crusade born. Its story is compelling, capable of inspiring awe through tales of bold adventure and revulsion through excesses of violence and barbarity, while at the same time providing us with significant insights into medieval society, morality and mentality. Tom Asbridge re-creates this fascinating period of history in a stunning narrative.

On the last Tuesday of November 1095, Pope Urban II delivered an electrifying speech that launched the First Crusade. His words set Christendom afire.

On the last Tuesday of November 1095, Pope Urban II delivered an electrifying speech that launched the First Crusade. His words set Christendom afire. Some 100,000 men, from knights to paupers, took up the call--the largest mobilization of manpower since the fall of the Roman Empire. Now, in The First Crusade, Thomas Asbridge offers a gripping account of a titanic three-year adventure filled with miraculous victories, greedy princes and barbarity on a vast scale. Readers follow the crusaders from their mobilization in Europe (where great waves of anti-Semitism resulted in the deaths of thousands of Jews), to their arrival in Constantinople, an exotic, opulent city--ten times the size of any city in Europe--that bedazzled the Europeans. Featured in vivid detail are the siege of Nicaea and the pivotal battle for Antioch, the single most important military engagement of the entire expedition, where the crusaders, in desperate straits, routed a larger and better-equipped Muslim army. Through all this, the crusaders were driven on by intense religious devotion, convinced that their struggle would earn them the reward of eternal paradise in Heaven. But when a hardened core finally reached Jerusalem in 1099 they unleashed an unholy wave of brutality, slaughtering thousands of Muslims--men, women, and children--all in the name of Christianity. The First Crusade marked a watershed in relations between Islam and the West, a conflict that set these two world religions on a course toward deep-seated animosity and enduring enmity. The chilling reverberations of this earth-shattering clash still echo in the world today.
  • The book is well written and the material seems well researched. I bought the book as the result of taking a class where I had to analyze Three historical documents reporting on Pope Urban’s speech at Clermont in 1095. At the time I did not know the difference between Pope Urban and Urban Outfitters. It didn’t take much to know I needed a lot of background material to understand a very complicated era. Unfortunately information about the events that formed the first crusade come from those that were there, not there or those who just made up facts to support their position. As a historian Thomas Asbridge’s status, to take the available info and translate it into a comprehensive book that tells a story of an era that has been poorly and/or falsely portrayed in history. There’s no doubt the principles in this book were not stupid but they were superstitious, gullible, and poorly educated. What they did by today’s standards are totally unacceptable but by the standards of the day were unfortunately commonly accepted. Asbridge does a good job defining the motivations separating greed and bloodthirst from religious fervor. It was also often difficult to follow all the names and places. It would have been nice to have a glossary/dictionary to help pronounce the names and understand the relationships. I would certainly recommend this book to anyone who would be interested in medieval history

  • So I read Asbridge's book "The Crusades" first, which is an entire history of The Crusades in the Holy Land and found it so interesting that I got "The First Crusade." I am very glad I did. The First Crusade is definitely the pinnacle story of the entire history of the Crusades and Asbridge does an amazing job bringing it to life. I really like how he shares tons of contemporary accounts and quotes and presents an unbiased opinion on what can be a rather controversial piece of history. Reads very easily despite containing a ridiculous amount of facts. I blew through it in less than a week.

  • Thomas Asbridge is a diligent historian, whose close familiarity with the First Crusade's route complements his knowledge of the relevant primary sources. This book is a survey aimed at a popular audience; it's quite scholarly but wears its learning lightly and is exciting to read. It's primarily a narrative history of the dramatic events of 1095-1099, but Asbridge skillfully analyzes the sources, along with motives and actions of the Crusaders. His coverage of the terrain around Antioch (Antakya), the pivotal sieges and nearby battles is exceptionally strong, drawing on his previous in-depth studies of the early Principality of Antioch. Asbridge argues that the First Crusade marked a new departure in relations between Islam, Byzantium and the West. He generally endorses the more recent consensus (e.g. of J. Riley-Smith) that Crusaders' prime motive was piety instead of profit, while showing that, given the character of 11C warfare, the two are not easily distinguishable. "TFC" mostly concerns itself with the Crusaders and the European context from which they came. It's quite evenhanded toward most participants, no mean achievement since crusading is a highly partisan subject. (Cf. various Islamophobic remarks in many other reviews, along with occasional strictures that Asbridge is pro-Christian!). In fact the book's main shortcoming is the lack of detailed attention to Muslims and Eastern Christians. His general history of the Crusades is stronger in this respect, but see also F. Gabrieli, "Arab Historians of the Crusades;" P. Frankopan, "The First Crusade;" P.Cobb, "The Race for Paradise;" and vol. 1 of S. Runciman's venerable "History of the Crusades." Asbridge's book is currently the best general work on the FC. 4.5 stars.

  • Thomas Asbridge's new history, The First Crusade, is a breath of fresh air. Few topics in history have been as mistreated and misused as the Crusades, giving rise to a great deal of popular rhetoric that has all but obscured the actual events themselves. Asbridge's book, however, cuts through the great majority of the myths and confronts the reader with real 11th-century men with real 11th-century concerns and beliefs.

    What struck me about the book was how carefully Asbridge highlighted the differences between modern and medieval modes of thought. This would seem to be an obvious goal of the historian, but too often a writer will criticize his subjects based on 21st-century values rather than examining the subject through his own. A few other reviewers have mistakenly said that Asbridge "justifies" or makes excuses for Crusader "atrocities." Nothing could be further from the truth. Asbridge simply puts the reader into the mind of the 11th-century warrior, repeatedly reminding the reader that, while we might cringe at the thought of civilian deaths today, during the Crusading era that was a way of life. This constant reminder of the differences between the past and present places Asbridge's history among the very best that I have read.

    One of the most important aspects of Asbridge's work is that he carefully entwines medieval piety with medieval concerns for prestige, landholdings, and booty. The result is a very well-realized glimpse into the medieval mind, where seemingly contradictory concepts held simultaneous sway for centuries.

    The book isn't perfect. Asbridge leaves little to no room for coincidence in the events he writes about. "All the evidence suggests," he says of the arrival of much-needed timber at Jaffa, "that the crusaders had not anticipated the fleet's arrival, but it would be incredible, almost miraculous, if such a timely boon had been wholly unplanned." In my admittedly limited experience, what all the evidence suggests is often the best interpretation. On a similar note, Asbridge seems to enjoy reading between the lines, conjecturing thoughts and motivations for figures--Urban II and Raymond of Toulouse in particular--that are possible, yes, but only possible.

    The greatest of the book's few weaknesses lies in Asbridge's picking and choosing of when to take the Crusaders at their word. He repeatedly tells us that the medievals exaggerated the size of armies, that they tended to gloss over embarassing episodes, and that they tended to downplay the Christians' level of involvement with the Muslims, but buys unreservedly into Crusader stories of the slaughter in Jerusalem, something evidence from the Muslim perspective suggests has been grossly exaggerated.

    But overall, despite one or two minor (and I emphasize minor) flaws, I really enjoyed Asbridge's book and found it to be among the best Crusade histories in recent memory. If only every crusade could get such a carefully-crafted treatment.

    Highly recommended.