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ePub Depression Glass: A Collector's Guide (Schiffer Book for Collectors) download

by Doris Yeske

ePub Depression Glass: A Collector's Guide (Schiffer Book for Collectors) download
Author:
Doris Yeske
ISBN13:
978-0764302107
ISBN:
0764302108
Language:
Publisher:
Schiffer Pub Ltd (April 1997)
Category:
Subcategory:
Antiques & Collectibles
ePub file:
1471 kb
Fb2 file:
1792 kb
Other formats:
mobi doc lrf azw
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
145

Shipping to Russian Federation. Depression Era Glass by Duncan Schiffer Book Collectors Guide Tiffin Pattern.

This is the perfect starter book for any would-be collector - a gentle and humorous introduction to the hobby starting with the origins of the glass, leading them. This is the perfect starter book for any would-be collector – a gentle and humorous introduction to the hobby starting with the origins of the glass, leading them through garage sales and auctions, and on to a more extensive knowledge of specific colors, patterns, pieces, and prominent companies.

Depression Glass: A Collector's Guide (Schiffer Book for Collectors). I enjoyed this book for being more than just a price guide. 0764322443 (ISBN13: 9780764322440). The only draw back is probably the repetition or repeated long lists. There are multiple times when the author talks about her red and green glass being used for Christmas or certain items being used for special occasions.

Depression Glass : A Collector's Guide, Paperback by Yeske, Doris, Brand New,. This is the perfect starter book for any would-be collector - a gentle and humorous introduction to the hobby starting with the origins of the glass, leading them through garage sales and auctions, and on to a more extensive knowledge of specific colors, patterns, pieces, and prominent companies. Schiffer Publishing LTD. ISBN-10.

Depression glass : a collector's guide. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. by. Yeske, Doris, 1925-. Atglen, PA : Schiffer Pub. Collection. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Doris Yeske is a retired teacher and veteran collector from Wisconsin. This is her third book on Depression Glass for Schiffer Publishing.

In stock on August 18, 2019. Doris Yeske is a retired teacher and veteran collector from Wisconsin. Series: Schiffer Book for Collectors. Colors & Patterns of Depression Era Glassware by Doris Yeske (Paperback, 2012). Country of Publication.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Series: A Schiffer Book for Collectors. Paperback: 175 pages. Publisher: Schiffer Pub Ltd (June 1, 1999). ISBN-13: 978-0764308383. Product Dimensions: 6 x . x . inches.

Collecting Glass & Glassware. Depression Glass by Duncan (A Schiffer Book for Collectors).

Book by Yeske, Doris
  • I bought this book for my sister who collects depression glass and she will find this a great tool when she goes shopping.

  • The book arrived in a timely fashion in very good condition. Great book for anyone who is interested in depression glass as a beginner or more experienced in the field..

  • Such a descriptive and thorough book. Helped me price my entire collection.

  • The third book of a trio that I have recently had from you. Very useful guidance for a novice.

  • I have a big pile of glass reference books because I am always anxious to get more knowledge about pieces I own and their names and manufacturers. I was recently disappointed with this purchase however. The pictures are what attracted me to buy it, but there is no logical order to any of them, and many are repeated after awhile leaving you feeling cheated. Under the pictures, you are lucky to make out which ones are the names of each, and hardly ever does Yeske tell you the actual manufacturer with it and never the years these items were made. For example, she'll say left to right, Anniversary, cake plate $12. No mention of the manufacturer Jeanette. Why not? Takes up not much space in the text! Moderntone, sherbet, $6 with no mention of Hazel Atlas though. I find that very annoying and if this is a reference, how can it be so lacking in information readily found in other books on the subject. At the end she shows a Swedish Modern bowl by Anchor Hocking, but this time she calls it a "bowl by Anchor Hocking" because this time she knows the manufacturer but not the pattern name! She also doesn't know that the production of the piece is mid 60s to 70s and not even depression at all! That is really sad. I may know the information, but if I didn't already learn through other research, I would be learning only a PIECE of the puzzles I was trying to solve. She goes on with some errors as well, for example, she lists a classic Indiana grape candlestick that any milk glass collector would know, as Westmoreland! I own both and there is a BIG difference. These errors and incomplete information makes the reader wonder how this got published as a reference book.

    The other major fault here is that too much text is wasted on Yeskes personal taste and opinions, which are fine to offer, but all her garage sale experiences devoted to chapters? Thrift stores, fleamarket experiences, and the bargains she thinks she has gotten comes off more like she is gloating about her finds than sharing. She voices her distaste for those who show up before the garage door opens, like she is annoyed the goodies will be pre-scooped. A book is not the forum to vent these opinions, we came for glass information only.

    Toward the end she reviews the same material, a waste of space. I know how to turn back the pages and do my own reviewing. I would like to see OTHER pieces. We leave this book knowing one thing for sure, Doris Yeske loves depression glass. Particularly, the Miss America line from Anchor Hocking in PINK. Her folded top bowl she touts as the beginning of her "addiction" is one of the big focal points of this book, while her price guide I believe is more her own prices SHE paid for the pieces, or got from Gene Florences much more indispensible volumes which are glass collector must haves. His books and others are listed as "research" references in the back, of course.

    While I can say this book has some entertainment value for a person who already has a good amount of knowledge, it is useless for the beginner. If you want this as a supplement, that is fine. If you want REAL info concisely structured pattern by pattern, manufacturer, price guide and years of production ON THE SAME PAGE, do like I do, buy more Gene Florence volumes. His are by far the most useful and accurate collectors guides of all.

  • I bought "Depression Glass: A Collector's Guide" long after I had acquired several pieces. Then I wanted to know their names and types. This book adequately identifies pieces and provides not only their history, but also a history of Depression Glass in general.

    Another reviewer said the prices are accurate (2005), but the most accurate prices come from the internet. What this book does is give a starting point and to provide pattern labels. I identified a gorgeous piece from the book that was not identical, but went to the internet, found the pattern, and finally the piece and its worth. There's nothing simpler--just a little detective work is required.

    The author explains the popularity of Depression Glass--color and mementos, how to become a collector and where to find pieces, and what to avoid. Depression glass is so-called because it was made during the Depression in bright, bold colors to create bright, cheerful table settings against the bleakness of the economy. Popular colors include light green, pink, ruby, iridescent, amber, white, dark green, cobalt, light blue, topaz, yellow, amethyst, and crystal.

    My favorite chapter is about patterns and the displays of so many patterns and types of dishes. This is where you go to find the piece you just bought or are considering for purchase. An interesting piece the author concentrates on is the berry bowl and shows its patterns and colors.

    Others popular to collect are creamer and sugar bowls in their array of colors and variety of designs.

    Finally, the book concludes with Tips for Collectors, How to be Your Own Detective, and a Glassware vocabulary. Although it can get expensive, this is a fun hobby. Needless to say, I don't buy expensive-- I buy for the fun of collecting. The excitement of finding an affordable piece is priceless!

  • i bought this book because I was interested in learning more about the various patterns of depression glass that I own and I'm intersted in owning. Ms. Yeske does a great job explaining how her passion for glass began and the things she loves to collect (such as candlesticks and sherbets) and the various ways she uses her pieces and how she displays them.

    I have to say that I did not buy this book with the assumption that it was an accurate price guide. It is not. Many of the prices quoted appear to be what Ms. Yeske paid for the pieces herself. And the photos are not as clear and vibrant as those contained in price guides. But if you go into this book knowing that, it is an enjoyable read for any glass collector who knows what it's like to inherit a piece and feel the passion grow.