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ePub Of Houshold Stuff: The 1601 Inventories of Bess of Hardwick download

by Satina Levey,Santina M. Levey,Peter Thornton

ePub Of Houshold Stuff: The 1601 Inventories of Bess of Hardwick download
Author:
Satina Levey,Santina M. Levey,Peter Thornton
ISBN13:
978-0707803296
ISBN:
0707803292
Language:
Publisher:
Natl Trust (October 1, 2002)
Category:
Subcategory:
Antiques & Collectibles
ePub file:
1253 kb
Fb2 file:
1834 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr lit doc
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
317

Of Household Stuff book

Of Household Stuff book. Bess was a meticulous record-keeper, and in 1601 probate inventories were compiled of her three houses. Published together for the first time, these extraordinary records provide a fascinating insight into one of the world's most important collections of 16th-century furniture and textiles.

Bess was a meticulous record-keeper, and in 1601 probate inventories were compiled of her three houses. Format Paperback 72 pages. Dimensions 189 x 246 x . 8mm 20. 2g. Publication date 01 Apr 2006.

Find nearly any book by Peter K Thornton. by Santina M Levey, Peter K Thornton

Find nearly any book by Peter K Thornton. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. by Santina M Levey, Peter K Thornton. ISBN 9781905400256 (978-1-905400-25-6) Softcover, Anova Books, 2006. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. com has become a leading book price comparison site

Elizabeth, Countess of Shrewsbury, more famously known as Bess of Hardwick, was born around 1527 and became .

Elizabeth, Countess of Shrewsbury, more famously known as Bess of Hardwick, was born around 1527 and became one of the most influential women of the age. Bess was a great builder, starting in the 1550s with her house at Chatsworth and culminating some 40 years later with the New Hall at Hardwick. If you are having difficulties in bringing the published book maybe the form of Of Household Stuff: The 1601 Inventories of Bess of Hardwick in e-book can be your substitute. Francisco Morgan: The reserve untitled Of Household Stuff: The 1601 Inventories of Bess of Hardwick is the e-book that recommended to you to read.

Look at other dictionaries: Bess of Hardwick - Bess of Hardwick, comtesse de Shrewsbury, par Rowland Lockley, 1592.

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Of Houshold Stuff: The 1601 Inventories of Bess of Hardwick. Santina M. Levey is an expert in 16th- and 17th-century textiles. She worked at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London for 20 years, the last 9 of them as Keeper of the Department of Textiles. Special offers and product promotions. She first visited Hardwick Hall in 1967, since when she has become the foremost specialist on the textiles there.

Elizabeth, Countess of Shrewsbury, more famously known as Bess of Hardwick, was born .

Elizabeth Hardwick, ou Hardwicke, comtesse de Shrewsbury, connue sous le nom de Bess of Hardwick (1527–1608), est la. .en) Santina Levey, Peter Thornton, Of Household Stuff: The 1601 Inventory of Bess of Hardwick, London, National Trust, 2001 (ISBN 978-0-7078-0329-6).

Elizabeth Hardwick, ou Hardwicke, comtesse de Shrewsbury, connue sous le nom de Bess of Hardwick (1527–1608), est la fille de John Hardwick. Mariée quatre fois, elle est l'ancêtre des ducs de Devonshire et des ducs de Newcastle, de par son mariage avec William Cavendish. en) Mary S. Lovell, Bess of Hardwick: First Lady of Chatsworth: 1527-1608, New York, Norton, 2006 (ISBN 0-393-06221-X et 978-0316724821).

Elizabeth, Countess of Shrewsbury, more famously known as Bess of Hardwick, was born c. 1527 and became one of the most influential women of the age. Married and widowed four times, she was an astute businesswoman who succeeded in amassing a huge personal fortune and extensive estates. Although she spent much of her time in Derbyshire, she counted privy councillors and members of the inner circle of courtiers among her friends, and enjoyed cordial relations with Queen Elizabeth herself. Bess was a great builder, starting in the 1550s with her house at Chatsworth and culminating some forty years later with the New Hall at Hardwick. All her homes, including Chatsworth and the two halls at Hardwick, were adorned with sumptuous contents and furnishings, the value of which equalled or exceeded that of the buildings themselves.Bess was a meticulous record-keeper, and in 1601 probate inventories were compiled of her three houses. Published together for the first time, these records provide insight into one of the world's most important collections of the 16th-century furniture and textiles. Commentaries by Peter K. Thornton and Santina M. Levey, both formerly of the Victoria and Albert Museum, explain the range and significance of the inventories.