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ePub LA Leche League : At the Crossroads of Medicine, Feminism, and Religion download

by Jule Dejager Ward

ePub LA Leche League : At the Crossroads of Medicine, Feminism, and Religion download
Author:
Jule Dejager Ward
ISBN13:
978-0807847916
ISBN:
0807847917
Language:
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press; 1 edition (January 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Home Improvement & Design
ePub file:
1202 kb
Fb2 file:
1346 kb
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
698

La Leche League book.

La Leche League book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. La Leche League: At the Crossroads of Medicine, Feminism, and Religion. by. Jule DeJager Ward.

Xi, 227 pages : 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (pages 191-217) and index. Introduction: La Leche League: religious metaphors in a secular ethos - What is La Leche League? -. - Mothers, medicine and misinformation - An Alternative approach: maternal knowing - Feminism and the motherhood wars - Challenging the public domain from within the private sphere - The evolution of a Catholic theology of the family - The La Leche League family: natural, loving and just - Asking the hard questions - Coping strategies for a. Changing environment.

Bibliographic Citation. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2000. Technology at the Crossroads: The Story of the Society, Religion and Technology Project . Ferguson, Ronald (1994). Related Items in Google Scholar.

At the Crossroads of Medicine, Feminism, and Religion. By Jule DeJager Ward. 248 p. . 25 x . 5, 12 illus. Paperback ISBN: 978-0-8078-4791-6 Published: January 2000. Offering a fascinating look inside an organization whose full history has been essentially untold, Jule Ward explores the genesis, theological underpinnings, and development of La Leche League. She demonstrates that, despite distancing itself from any overt expression of its religious roots, the organization remains a quasi-religious articulation of Catholic social thought blended with scientific ideology and feminism.

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LA Leche League At the Crossroads of Medicine, Feminism, and Religion.

Published: 1 January 2002. Church History, Volume 71. PubMed.

One Baby's Experience- A Pictorial. Complications of Circumcision" by Rosemary Romberg. Jesus never advocated circumcision. St. Peter dismissed circumcision as unnecessary and disadvantageous in Acts 15:10, "And now are you going to correct God by burdening the Gentiles with a yoke that neither we nor our fathers were able to bear?" St. Paul often condemned circumcising the flesh, as seen in the following passages: Galatians 5:2-6: �Pay close attention to me, Paul, when I tell you that if you have yourselves circumcised, Christ will be of no use to you.

La Leche League: At the Crossroads of Medicine, Feminism, and Religion. Kathleen M. Joyce (a1). Published online by Cambridge University Press: 28 July 2009. Export citation Request permission. Recommend this journal. March 2002 · Church History.

In 1956, when La Leche League was founded, if a new mother chose to breastfeed rather than bottlefeed her child, she could by no means expect universal support for her decision. Though physicians of the era admitted that breastfeeding was the best method of infant feeding, they warned of the difficulties that nursing mothers faced, and many held that successful breastfeeding required a knowledge of science and medicine that most new mothers could not claim. Started by seven Catholic women who simply wished to help their friends learn to breastfeed, La Leche League grew into an organization with several million members worldwide, known here and abroad for its pathbreaking promotion of the breastfeeding of infants.Offering a fascinating look inside an organization whose full history has been essentially untold, Jule Ward explores the genesis, theological underpinnings, and development of La Leche League. She demonstrates that, despite distancing itself from any overt expression of its religious roots, the organization remains a quasi-religious articulation of Catholic social thought blended with scientific ideology and feminism. In short, says Ward, the story of La Leche League provides an excellent example of how religion in practice permeates everyday life.
  • This is a book I came to enthusiastically. The topic interested me greatly as someone who "grew up" as a mother in LLL and as a convert to the Catholic Church. I came away from the book feeling as if the author had not done justice to either organization. She is dismissive in places of the idea that breast is best, despite increasing scientific verification of what LLL has said from the beginning. She fails to understand the relationship of the theology of the body and Catholic economic and social teachings.

    What she does well is to point out the ways in which LLL empowered women to make social change one mother at a time. The change has yet to be complete and there is still more work that needs doing. She alludes to the fact that infant needs are currently competing with societal and feminist expectations, but doesn't really campaign for the thoroughgoing reform that would be needed for not only women's needs to be better served, but for all of our needs to be better served. She falls into the trap of seeing sequencing as unfair to women and as a way for a male dominated culture to keep women in their place rather than recognizing that perhaps it is a very good way for women to actively impact their culture and change it for the better.

    I bought the book because after doing a bit of reading in Catholic social teaching I began to realize how much that philosophy underpinned everything I learned in LLL. Somehow this author, who apparently became far more enamored with feminist theology than classical Catholic theology failed to understand how Catholic social teaching supports women. I was disappointed that the author did not even mention writers like Chesterton and made very little reference to Pope John Paul II's theology of the body which seems very directly tied to the subject. Her review of the two most important papal documents on economics was sparse at best.

    A societal revolution in which babies had easy access to their mothers, mothers were allowed to work at interesting work without warehousing their children, and fathers and grandparents were also encouraged to participate in children's lives does not seem to be that huge a stretch. In agrarian societies mothers took their babies to work with them. In small entreprenurial situations the same thing occurs today. I actually spent the first three years of my life in the office of a gas station while my mother worked alongside my father (who owned it). It is a false model that says women cannot both be present for their children and accomplish other things as well. In some cases on-site daycare is the solution, in others working at home and connecting to the office by computer works better. For some women sequencing is the answer: full time mothering now, part-time work in a few years, full time profession again later on. What the false choice is is to place babies real biological and emotional needs in conflict with it's mother's needs (whether economic, emotional, or socially generated). Once we recognize how much healthier our children would be if we changed the model and how much better off we all would be for having an economy that is people friendly instead of simply bottom line friendly we will see that the founding mothers of LLL had it right all along.

    This author loses credibility when she questions the biological superiority of breast milk over formula. However, she in essence has to do that in order to support the idea that other people can care for the baby equally as well as the mother. She questions studies like Oneness and Separateness principally because they are at odds with feminist thought. In the twentieth century the idea that human milk was better than formula was roundly criticized by the medical community. Now, it is beginning to be recognized that the best formula manufacturers can do will probably always fall short of the biological norm. I suspect that we may ultimately realize that the same is true of the presence of the mother herself. Other caregivers may be adequate for survival, but something is truly lost to the baby who does not have ready access to his own mother in the early weeks and months. The idea of the baby human as having an extra uterine period of nine months comparable to the inter uterine growth period is not so very far fetched, even if it doesn't marry well with current feminist thought. The woman who embraces her role as mother as well as seeing herself as an intelligent woman who can contribute to society in other ways is the truly liberated woman, not the one who's chained to the models of the modern economic and political system.

  • DeJagger Ward explores the history of La Leche League and uncovers the Catholic theology roots within its philosophy of mother-baby togetherness. As a former La Leche League leader herself, DeJagger Ward offers a unique inside-look into an organization that empowers women to breastfeed. The best chapter is chapter 8, "Asking Hard Questions" where DeJagger probes and critically offers analysis of the areas where La Leche League needs to grow and improve if it is to continue to reach out to all women. DeJagger also points out areas where La Leche League philosophy may marginalize some women, particularly in its philosophy and how it functions. Highly recommended to all involved in La Leche League as a book to use in measuring how the group is or is not meeting the needs of all women. A good read for anybody who would like to understand the politics of breastfeeding within American culture and learn how La Leche League works in helping the mother-baby breastfeeding dyad. Dejagger's analysis of women's roles, family structure and gender issues in family paradigms are supurb. Includes interviews with La Leche League founders and women involved in the politics of breastfeeding. Well referenced. La Leche League may find some parts of this book controversial. An excellent analysis of La Leche League from a feminist basepoint.

  • A somewhat interesting look at the history of La Leche League International, Inc. (for a more thorough history read The LLLove Story and Seven Voices, One Dream), it's Catholic roots, unique type of feminism, and how this all has affected the organization.
    That being said, while it is somewhat interesting, it was somewhat shallow. The author makes reference to various ideas in feminism and Catholic theology, but fails to expound upon them. There seems to be the assupmtion that the reader is already familiar with all of the ideas, feminism and Catholic theology, that La Leche League is being compared and contrasted with. Perhaps this author was a bit more ambitous than capable?
    There is a rather good, but gentle, critique of certain La Leche League practices and ideas. Again, though, the author only mentions areas that seem to need review and reflection without much explanation or offer of solution.
    Altogether, it is a book worth reading once (but not buying, just go to the library) if you are interested and want one perspective as a starting point. It is to be stressed though, that this book is only a starting point on any of the topics that it would claim to cover (La Leche League, feminism, Catholic theology). Without a more thorough understanding of these topics than the author offers up, it really isn't possible to understand the interplay they have had with La Leche League as an organization

  • This is a much needed analysis of a organization dear to my heart, which sets out to do very important work. It has blind spots, as pointed out in this work, but they aren't very clearly articulated.