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ePub The Gettin Place download

by Susan Straight

ePub The Gettin Place download
Author:
Susan Straight
ISBN13:
978-0385486590
ISBN:
0385486596
Language:
Publisher:
Anchor; Reprint edition (July 14, 1997)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humor
ePub file:
1859 kb
Fb2 file:
1761 kb
Other formats:
lrf rtf mobi mbr
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
298

Susan Straight's most powerful novel yet is framed by two race riots: the little known Tulsa riots of the 1920s, in which .

Susan Straight's most powerful novel yet is framed by two race riots: the little known Tulsa riots of the 1920s, in which white Tulsa burned down the town's black enclave; and the notorious L. A. riots of the 1990s. Straight's brilliant story of the effects of violence in America on three generations of a family is told through the lives of the Thompsons, a large clan who live in Treetown, above downtown Rio Seco, California, and operate a car towing and repair business. The Gettin Place is a powerful portrait of a family struggling to defend its turf in a changing world, to hold on to the gettin place, the source from which they derive the tools for survival.

The Gettin Place book. Through this novel and her other Rio Seco books, Susan Straight has written the story of a community complete with struggles and celebration. However, it has a critical central theme that is (unfortunately) as relevant today as it was when the book was published in 1996.

Susan Straight (born October 19, 1960) is an American writer. She was a National Book Award finalist for the novel Highwire Moon in 2001. Susan Straight attended John W. North High School in Riverside, California and took classes at Riverside Community College while in high school. She went on to earn a scholarship to the University of Southern California and, in 1984, earned her . from the University of Massachusetts Amherst's MFA Program for Poets & Writers.

The Gettin' Place book.

Serafina is an illegal migrant worker living in California when the police catch her and send her back to Mexico - without her three-year old daughter.

To understand my daughters and their sisterhood, you have to know the women, and sisters, who came before. In the Country of Women is a valuable social history and a personal narrative that reads like a love song to America and indomitable women. Serafina is an illegal migrant worker living in California when the police catch her and send her back to Mexico - without her three-year old daughter.

She was Marietta, who got her own book in I Been in Sorrow’s Kitchen and Licked Out All the Pots . Highwire Moon (2001) (finalist for the National Book Award). The Gettin’ Place (1997). Blacker than a Thousand Midnights (1995). I Been in Sorrow’s Kitchen and Licked Out All the Pots (1993).

She was Marietta, who got her own book in I Been in Sorrow’s Kitchen and Licked Out All the Pots; Darnell got his own book in Blacker Than a Thousand Midnights. Marcus Thompson, who was the high school teacher and hero of The Gettin Place, is a lost love in my new book Take One Candle Light a Room. Serafina, a Mexican mother featured in Highwire Moon, showed up unexpectedly when I wrote this new novel.

Straight explores the reactions of Hosea's aggrieved and mystified family; his memories of the (historical) race riots of some 60 years earlier in Tulsa .

Straight explores the reactions of Hosea's aggrieved and mystified family; his memories of the (historical) race riots of some 60 years earlier in Tulsa, Oklahoma, when his family was terrorized and his father killed; the enlistment of his youngest son Marcus (a high-school history teacher, whom his rough-edged older siblings nickname & to help prove Hosea's innocence; and Marcus's own complicated memories of growing up knowing he wanted a different life, struggling to keep his distance from his family without succumbing to condescension.

About The Gettin Place. Susan Straight is the author of six novels, including A Million Nightingales and the National Book Award finalist Highwire Moon. Susan Straight’s most powerful novel yet is framed by two race riots: the little known Tulsa riots of the 1920s, in which white Tulsa burned down the town’s black enclave; and the notorious L. Straight’s brilliant story of the effects of violence in America on three generations of a family is told through the lives of the Thompsons, a large clan who live in Treetown, above downtown Rio Seco, California, and operate a car towing and repair business.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Novelist and short story writer Susan Straight graduated from Amherst College in 1984. She teaches Creative Writing at the University of California in Riverside. Aquaboogie, her first collection of short stories, won the Milkweed National Fiction Prize and was one of Publishers Weekly's best paperbacks (1990).

Susan Straight's most powerful novel yet is framed by two race riots: the little known Tulsa riots of the 1920s, in which white Tulsa burned down the town's black enclave; and the notorious L. A. riots of the 1990s.Straight's brilliant story of the effects of violence in America on three generations of a family is told through the lives of the Thompsons, a large clan who live in Treetown, above downtown Rio Seco, California, and operate a car towing and repair business. Patriarch Hosea is a proud man, and a hardened one, whose father was killed in the violence that erupted in Tulsa many years earlier. All Hosea's memories come flooding black with ferocious force when the bodies of two white women are found engulfed in flames in an abandoned car on his property. These are the first signs that someone wants Hosea off his land; it is up to his son Marcus, the only one of the six children of Hosea and his half-Mexican wife who can negotiate with the white world, to help the family hold on to their home and their livelihood.But it is only when Marcus' nephew Motrice-a young man infatuated with guns and the power that they bring- comes back to Rio Seco from gang-ridden Los Angeles that the real secrets of the bodies found on Thompson land are revealed, as Rio Seco erupts in the same wave of trashing and looting that has engulfed the nearby metropolis.The Gettin Place is a powerful portrait of a family struggling to defend its turf in a changing world, to hold on to the gettin place, the source from which they derive the tools for survival.
  • "I Been in Sorrow's Kitchen and Licked Out All the Pots" was the first book I read by Susan Straight. While I read I thought, "Susan Straight. Sounds like a white woman's name". But I thought the name might be a pseudonym. Her characters voices are uncannily real--male, female, black, white, latino, asian, mixes, old, young, child, poor, middle-class, wealthy, intellectual, athlete, mixes again. She does 'em all. I finished that first story fast. It's the kind of book that makes you lose sleep because you can't put it down. I love her writing, but on a negative note--I've loaned her stories to others and do not get them back. Readers know what's good, I guess.

  • I only discovered Susan Straight a short time ago. I have enjoyed all of her books so far. I have the latest waiting on my Kindle

  • The book is magnificent. The plot weaves in and out highlighting issues of supreme importance. Hosea and Oscar Thompson are shadow men. Maybe they killed in the past, Hosea a guard, Oscar a man who bothered his wife. Hosea has an auto yard and towing service and Oscar a barbecue joint in Treetown on the edge of Rio Seco, a seemingly fictitious city east of Los Angeles. The novel includes a sort of coming of age tale of Hosea's youngest son, Marcus, even though Marcus is thirty already. Marcus teaches history at the local high school. Unlike his brothers who work in the car yard and attended the neighborhood school before it was closed when district lines were abolished to achieve integration, he attended college, at least in spurts. Hosea's wife cares for three grandchildren. There is a fire in the yard and two dead white women are discovered in an immovable car on the premises, notwithstanding the fact that the gate was locked. Hosea is shot because he fails to drop his own rifle quickly enough to suit the police, and he is held in the hospital in the jail ward. As the strands of the story develop it becomes apparent that the family is the focus of actions to remove them from their land in the name of progress and aesthetics, aesthetics that is from a white perspective. The circumstances are particularly poignant since Hosea and Oscar moved from Greenwood driven out by the riot and fire in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1921. Thank you Susan Straight. What a joy it is to read your book.

  • The getting place is the story of marcus and his brother's trying to find out whose being killing people on their father's property. The book show's the importance of family, sibling rivarly, and how the family get through everday problems. The brother's are also reunited with their sister and nephrew, who had left home, and no one knew were she was. I think the author did good in writing about the lifes of black characthers.

  • This is Susan Straight's best work so far. It is a crime/mystery story, a richly populated family drama, and a revelation of contemporary social ills and their deep roots in history. It educates the reader without being pedantic, through the diverse voices who tell tales that are not available anywhere else in print. No clear solutions are given for the racial and economic tensions explored in the book, since the "One World" philosophy promoted by a few characters appears to be little more than a slogan and consumer lifestyle favoring exoticism. The depth of the characters' self-exploration, the richness of their histories, and their intimate connection to the land are what prevent the reader from falling into utter despair and vacant horror over the many atrocities in the novel. This book has left me wondering about many issues, including: why do I never hear or see anything about this author? (I discovered her first novel by chance in the library and have been a fan ever since). Miscellaneous observation: this book contains the word "whorl" more times than any book I've read.