mostraligabue
» » Pop Apocalypse: A Possible Satire

ePub Pop Apocalypse: A Possible Satire download

by Lee Konstantinou

ePub Pop Apocalypse: A Possible Satire download
Author:
Lee Konstantinou
ISBN13:
978-0061715372
ISBN:
0061715379
Language:
Publisher:
Ecco; Original edition (April 28, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humor
ePub file:
1446 kb
Fb2 file:
1997 kb
Other formats:
lrf rtf mbr azw
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
371

Lee Konstantinou fled the corporate world to join a doctoral program in the English department at Stanford University. Born in New York City, he now lives in San Francisco.

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Lee Konstantinou fled the corporate world to join a doctoral program in the English department at Stanford University. Библиографические данные. Pop Apocalypse: A Possible Satire.

Konstantinou wrote Pop Apocalypse: A Possible Satire, which was published in 2009 by Ecco/Harper Perennial

Konstantinou wrote Pop Apocalypse: A Possible Satire, which was published in 2009 by Ecco/Harper Perennial. The novel details a future in which "California is an occupied territory, the United Nations is for poor countries, and America’s president is named Friendly, but the media-obsessed, uipped denizens are blissfully unconcerned about the brink of armageddon.

The Middle East-now a single consumerist Caliphate led by Lebanese pop singer Caliph Fred-is in an uproar after an attack on the al-Aqsa Mosque gets televised on the Holy Land Channel

The Middle East-now a single consumerist Caliphate led by Lebanese pop singer Caliph Fred-is in an uproar after an attack on the al-Aqsa Mosque gets televised on the Holy Land Channel. The world is on the brink of a total radioactive, no-survivors war, and humankind's last hope is Eliot R. Vanderthorpe, J. celebrity heir, debauched party animal, and Elvis impersonation scholar. But Eliot's got his own problems. His evangelical dad is breeding red heifers in anticipation of the Rapture. Eliot's dissertation is in the toilet. And he has a doppelgänger. An evil doppelgänger.

Pop apocalypse : a possible satire. Pop apocalypse : a possible satire. by. Konstantinou, Lee. Publication date. New York : Harper Perennial.

Fans who enjoy an irreverent look at modern culture will want to read Lee Kostaninou's amusing take no prisoners' tale.

Pop Apocalypse: A Possible Satire is a highly entertaining shaggy dog story about the confluence of branding and Big Brother in the near future. Instead of dwelling Disclaimer: Lee and I were on panel together at the 2009 . Times Festival of Books

Pop Apocalypse: A Possible Satire. Pop Apocalypse - Lee Konstantinou.

Pop Apocalypse: A Possible Satire. FROM THE NEWLY BUILT MINARET of the al-Aqsa Mosque, the mu’azzin shouts the noontime call to prayer, sponsored today by the Caliph Fred Entertainment Group. Outside the wall of the Old City, Jerusalem’s lunchtime crowds compete with electric mopeds for space on narrow lanes. Abusing the future to make hash of the present, Lee Konstantinou has fashioned one hell of a satire, one hell of a world

Pop Apocalypse: A Possible Satire. The Middle East-now a single consumerist Caliphate led by Lebanese pop singer Caliph Fred-is in an uproar after an attack on the al-Aqsa Mosque gets televised on the Holy Land Channel. Abusing the future to make hash of the present, Lee Konstantinou has fashioned one hell of a satire, one hell of a world. The writing is stunning, every sentence so packed with knowledge and wit that one’s laughter can barely catch up with the story.

Pop Apocalypse will appeal to cynics, coffee-drinkers, media theorists, armchair generals, celebrity-watchers, pop .

Pop Apocalypse will appeal to cynics, coffee-drinkers, media theorists, armchair generals, celebrity-watchers, pop philosophers and geeks of all sorts. This near-future dystopia reminds me of William Gibson's Pattern Recognition with a splash of Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake and social analysis by Malcolm Gladwell's evil twin.

It doesn't take a paranoid mind to fret over our state of hyper-marketing. It's a bit creepy, yet we'd be vaguely insulted if said.

The United States and its Freedom Coalition allies are conducting serial invasions across the globe, including an attack on the anti-capitalist rebels of Northern California. The Middle East—now a single consumerist Caliphate led by Lebanese pop singer Caliph Fred—is in an uproar after an attack on the al-Aqsa Mosque gets televised on the Holy Land Channel.

The world is on the brink of a total radioactive, no-survivors war, and human­kind's last hope is Eliot R. Vanderthorpe, Jr., celebrity heir, debauched party animal, and Elvis impersonation scholar. But Eliot's got his own problems. His evangelical dad is breeding red heifers in anticipation of the Rapture. Eliot's dissertation is in the toilet. And he has a doppelgänger. An evil doppelgänger.

  • A talented novelist here who unlike most novelist actually knows conservatives, even those he doesn't always like. Interesting take.

  • This book is such an amazing introductory novel for Konstantinou and I am very glad to have picked it up on a whim. The book was a joy to read, full of action, satire, comedy, love and hate. I have gladly recommended this to many of my friends and I wish you would stop reading this review and purchase the book (the button is in the upper right hand corner). For what these reviews are worth, I promise you will not be disappointed.

  • In the near future the mediasphere has replaced the Internet, enabling users to follow the lives of people to the minutest detail. In fact reputable names have become a commodity item traded on the Reputations Exchange.

    Eliot Vanderthorpe, Sr. is the CEO of the firm that runs the mediasphere. Unlike his successful dad, Eliot, Jr. is a wastrel failure. Frustrated with his no chip off the block offspring Sr. places the name of Jr. on the Reputations Exchange. Eliot the son learns of another Eliot living in the banned off-limits Occupied Zone of Northern California where anti capitalists once held sway. Junior decides to meet his other self only to find a conspiracy spinning in many directions like an octopus' tentacles.

    This future tale is a fast-paced lampooning of celebrity fame, pop culture, and media attention span as to what is important. The story line is fast-paced throughout as capitalist society is satirized on seemingly every page; even the Middle East has become one caliphate run by a pop idol. Fans who enjoy an irreverent look at modern culture will want to read Lee Kostaninou's amusing take no prisoners' tale.

    Harriet Klausner

  • Projecting the facile hawkishness of the Bush era forwards, Pop Apocalypse imagines the kind of future we'd have wound up in in had the War on Terror somehow turned out to be a sustainable franchise.

    Everyone is a commodity, war is just business as usual, the mediasphere has swallowed all social activity, fandom has superceded other forms of research, and branding is on the point of making products unnecessary. The feckless Eliot is the perfect antihero for such a world, a slacker invariably in trouble with his girlfriend Sarah, yet always likeable.

    Konstantinou keeps the action coming, and in the end, Eliot has to determine whether the dystopian world he lives in is worth making sacrifices for. Despite living in an age of total marketing, Eliot manages to acquire a sense of responsibility. Staking out his territory somewhere between Don DeLillo and William Gibson, Konstantinou creates a world where satire and prediction fuse.

  • Let me start by saying Lee's a friend of mine. That said, I wouldn't be writing this review if I didn't genuinely enjoy the book.

    Pop Apocalypse will appeal to cynics, coffee-drinkers, media theorists, armchair generals, celebrity-watchers, pop philosophers and geeks of all sorts. This near-future dystopia reminds me of William Gibson's Pattern Recognition with a splash of Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake and social analysis by Malcolm Gladwell's evil twin.

    Eliot Vanderthorpe, Jr. is our antihero, struggling through a life of wearying wealth and excess until a devious plot casts him in the uncomfortable role of world-saver. He lives in a universe where the logic of total surveillance has been realized, privatized, and supersized: celebrity brands and reputations are traded like stocks. It is life as we know it, only a little more twisted, extreme, and dark. Just check the Terror Forecast before driving through Jersey.

    I love the humor and keen satirical wit of the book, but ultimately what makes it not just fun but satisfying is that Lee isn't simply taking shots here. Hapless, hopelessly hip Eliot develops that most unusual of modern appendages: a conscience.

  • "Pop Apocalypse" comes right out of the ethos of the "end of times," which characterized much of the political and cultural rhetoric of the Bush years, and is shot through and through with irony.
    You'll recognize a world that we are familiar with: of celebrities and scandal, a world that is branded and over-branded. At its center is the protagonist, Eliot Vanderthorpe, debauched party go-er, playboy, a brand unto himself, with his entourage of faithful fans and admirers. As attempts to catalyze the apocalypse into happening occur and a grand face-off in the "Holy Land" seems imminent, Konstantionu keeps us guessing as to what will happen till the very end.
    "Pop Apocalypse" is readable, entertaining, hilarious, fast-paced, and yet for all its hipness and cool, the underlying message of the novel is serious, its critique of fundamentalism, religious or economic, devastating. To lovers of fiction, followers of world affairs, religion and economics, this is one novel you won't want to miss reading.

  • It's odd reviewing a book written by a friend, but given that I found Pop Apocalypse throughly enjoyable, entertaining and even a little thought-provoking, a review seems like the thing to do.

    The plot weaves elements from economics, religion and technology into an engaging futurist tapestry. Moreover, while the biting satire often drifts into the absurd (with suitably humorous results), just as you think the red cows, doppelgangers and Lebanese pop singers are just there for laughs, a deeper point emerges.

    I was especially struck by the carefully-constructed economy of Reputation and Names. Fans of economically literate fiction will find much to engage them here. As will those who wonder at the possibilities for increasing the intersection of the digital world with society at large.

    In fact the combination of absurd profoundity (or, perhaps profound absurdity) along a lively futurist vision reminds me most of the cyberpunk offerings of Neil Stephenson (Snow Crash) and Charles Stross (Halting State). If you're a fan of either or both of these guys, you should definitely pick up a copy of Pop Apocalypse.