mostraligabue
» » 7 Steps to Better Chess

ePub 7 Steps to Better Chess download

by Eric Schiller

ePub 7 Steps to Better Chess download
Author:
Eric Schiller
ISBN13:
978-1580422406
ISBN:
1580422403
Language:
Publisher:
Cardoza (April 13, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Puzzles & Games
ePub file:
1431 kb
Fb2 file:
1639 kb
Other formats:
lrf azw lrf mobi
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
703

The quick and easy guide that shows players how to take their game to the next level and become a winner Players of all levels learn how to improve their chess play by cutting down on tactical and strategic mistakes

The quick and easy guide that shows players how to take their game to the next level and become a winner Players of all levels learn how to improve their chess play by cutting down on tactical and strategic mistakes.

Players of all levels learn how to improve their chess play by cutting down on tactical and strategic mistakes  .

7 Steps to Better Chess book.

This book is dedicated to all those who have taught me lessons over the years, on and off the chessboard.

Steps to better chess. Steps to better chess. A guide to immediately making you a bmer player. This book is dedicated to all those who have taught me lessons over the years, on and off the chessboard. FREE ONLINE CHESS MAGAZINE ww. hesscity. com Check out Cardoza Publishing's free online chess maga zine with ar ti cl es, sampl e games from g reat players and world cham­. pions, columns, gossip, and more. The web's most interesti n g.

Электронная книга "7 Steps to Better Chess", Eric Schiller

Электронная книга "7 Steps to Better Chess", Eric Schiller. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "7 Steps to Better Chess" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Not until after I bought this book, & Steps to Better Chess,'' did I realize (because of a note in the book itself) . The premise of the book is interesting enough: Schiller looks at errors in his own games which illustrate important principles of play or study.

Not until after I bought this book, & Steps to Better Chess,'' did I realize (because of a note in the book itself) that it is a republication, with a new name, of the 2002 book & of a Chess Master. That book bore the subtitle & Steps to Chess Success. The book itself is based on analysis of the author's own games, but beginning in the middle. That part is certainly well-enough done, and I found it useful.

7 Steps to Better Chess : A Guide to Immediately Making You a Better Player. By (author) Eric Schiller.

I am a collector of Chess books as well as being a player of the game. I recently purchased a copy of FM Eric Schiller's book 7 Steps To Better Chess. The 192 page book is published by Cardoza Publishing which has done many of Schiller's books in the past. I highly recommend this book to club players. The book has seven lessons that cover the game of Chess.

Good news - You can still get free 2-day shipping, free pickup, & more. To ensure we are able to help you as best we can, please include your reference number: CJ8LR537FB. Try another ZIP code. Generated at Wed, 06 Nov 2019 12:09:14 GMT exp-ck: 2h9L11; xpa: Lmu-J2h9L1; Electrode, Comp-701217844, DC-prod-cdc01, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-19. 31, 2e21, 409e6a28f90, Generated: Wed, 06 Nov 2019 12:09:14 GMT. Books. Thank you for signing up!

The quick and easy guide that shows players how to take their game to the next level and become a winner!Players of all levels learn how to improve their chess play by cutting down on tactical and strategic mistakes. Using examples from his own games, Schiller illustrates the types of errors typically found at each stage of chess development, from early scholastic games to professional encounters with grandmasters. In each case, Schiller shows how such errors can be overcome while at the same time showing how professional players can fall prey to the same problems as amateurs. Learn from the author’s mistakes and you won’t suffer the terrible fate that awaits most blunders!
  • The title of my review may not be entirely fair to the author Eric Schiller, but his publisher Cardoza wasn't fair with me. Not until after I bought this book, ``7 Steps to Better Chess,'' did I realize (because of a note in the book itself) that it is a republication, with a new name, of the 2002 book ``Development of a Chess Master.'' That book bore the subtitle ``55 Steps to Chess Success.'' How 55 steps suddenly becomes 7 I'm not sure, but the point is that nobody needs to buy this book twice. The book itself is based on analysis of the author's own games, but beginning in the middle. Leaving out the openings greatly reduced my interest in this book eight years ago. Giving the book a new title doesn't cure that deficiency. That said, I am not one who routinely knocks Mr. Schiller. He writes some good stuff, and I wish he had a much smarter publisher.7 Steps to Better Chess

  • This book is practically a page for page reissue of the 2002 book "Development of a Chess Master" (with a new cover) but you won't realize this probably until after you've laid down cash for the book; there's just a small line on an inside page that tells you this and you're not likely to see it.

    Now, to be sure, I like Schiller and most of his work, and I *thought* I was happy to find a new book of his. Except, then I discovered that it's actually a rather old book.

    And then there's the editing. Cardoza has a well-deserved reputation for poor editing of their game books. Most of them are riddled with typos and errors. This one, though, takes things to a new level. Whole chapters are mislabelled and out of order. The chapter titled "Lessons in the Opening" is actually about tactics. But then, the chapter titled "Lessons in Basic Tactics" is actually about openings. The book's intro lists the chapters in a different order than they actually appear.

    Whole paragraphs are dropped or repeated willy-nilly. And that's not even getting into potential errors in the chess play (I didn't review every position but many errors have been reported by others).

    The premise of the book is interesting enough: Schiller looks at errors in his own games which illustrate important principles of play or study. That part is certainly well-enough done, and I found it useful. But the book is so badly put together that to reward Cardoza with your money for such carelessness and neglect--- not to mention the "hidden" reissue of an old book as if it were new--- is something I heartily recommend you don't do.