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by Michael Ritchie

ePub Please Stand By: A Prehistory of Television download
Author:
Michael Ritchie
ISBN13:
978-0879515461
ISBN:
0879515465
Language:
Publisher:
Overlook Books; First Edition edition (September 1, 1994)
Category:
Subcategory:
Television
ePub file:
1794 kb
Fb2 file:
1230 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
311

Please Stand By looks back at the rough pioneer beginnings of T. Well, actually, it did, if only experimentally. According to Michael Ritchie, those who think the television era began when Uncle Miltie donned his first ball gown are in for quite a shock.

Please Stand By looks back at the rough pioneer beginnings of T.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 237-239) and index. Even before there was "Howdy Doody" or "The Honeymooners," there was television, the medium that would define and change forever the twentieth century. Please Stand By looks back at the rough pioneer beginnings.

Please Stand By book. Start by marking Please Stand By: A Prehistory of Television as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Written by film director Ritchie (The Candidate, et., the book shows the chaotic beginnings that justified the . Ritchie chronicles many of TV's historic firsts., the book shows the chaotic beginnings that justified the once widely held belief that this gimmicky new technology had no future. A fuzzy picture was first telecast on a bulky monitor with a tiny screen in the 1920s by Philo T. Farsworth, a high school student in rural Utah. In 1927, for example, future president Herbert Hoover was the first public official to speak in front of a ""televisor"" in Washington . while his wife appeared from New York. They were followed by a comedian in black-face who called his routine ""a new line of jokes in negro dialect.

Please Stand By looks back at the rough pioneer beginnings of TV, when the glow from the small screen .

Please Stand By looks back at the rough pioneer beginnings of TV, when the glow from the small screen brought magic into every home that had a se. This is also the story of inventors like Philo Farnsworth, who invented electronic television as a high school student in rural Utah (he also invented the first fax machine), and the first network battles, between companies such as RCA, NBC and DuMont.

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Please Stand By: A Prehistory of Television. The book begins by chronicling television's technical development and the maneuvering of radio barons such as David Sarnoff and William Paley. Overlook Press, 1995. He dismisses the early rivalry between the mechanical and electronic systems far too easily, noting that the mechanical systems "just stank"; his characterization of the medium's pioneers as "scientists with vision but no money and businessmen with plenty of money but little vision" is a decided oversimplification.

Items related to Please Stand By: A Prehistory of Television

Items related to Please Stand By: A Prehistory of Television. Ritchie, Michael Please Stand By: A Prehistory of Television.

Michael Brunswick Ritchie (November 28, 1938 – April 16, 2001) was an American film director of films with comical or. .

Michael Brunswick Ritchie (November 28, 1938 – April 16, 2001) was an American film director of films with comical or satirical leanings, such as The Candidate and Smile. He scored commercial successes directing sports films like Downhill Racer and The Bad News Bears, and Chevy Chase's Fletch comedies.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Very Good, PLEASE STAND BY: Prehistory of.Publisher : THE OVERLOOK PRESS. Product Category : Books. Condition : Very Good. List Price (MSRP) : 1. 9

Publisher : THE OVERLOOK PRESS. 9. Slight rubbing to edges and slight marks to edge of pages. See all. About this item.

Looks at the early history of television and describes the first commercial, soap opera, sportscast, and newscast
  • An editorial review calls this book "dull." Dullness, like beauty, is in the beholder's eye. This beholder is fascinated with the pioneering days of broadcasting; unsurprisingly, I found this book tremendously interesting and even entertaining. By focusing on the people and the anecdotes of television's experimental days, Ritchie vividly transmits the new medium's uncertainty and excitement.

  • Excellent source of information regarding the trials and tribulations of the origin of TV.

  • What do Milton Berle, Eddie Albert, and Dinah Shore have in common? They've all appeared on television. OK, you knew that--what you may NOT know, however, is that they all made their first TV appearance far sooner than you may think. Try 1929, 1936 and 1938 respectively.

    Wait a minute, you say, television didn't exist yet. Well, actually, it did, if only experimentally. According to Michael Ritchie, those who think the television era began when Uncle Miltie donned his first ball gown are in for quite a shock.

    Ritchie takes us into the hitherto unexplored "prehistory" of television, an era that in some ways typified Murphy's Law. Everything that could go wrong usually did--from Dinah Shore's disastrous singing debut (her mascara melted under the blistering hot lights) to the "nude" chorus girls in one early 30's production number (early cameras were insensitive to the girls' red costumes).

    The book takes us through the pioneering days of what are now industry staples--television sports, news, drama, and quiz shows. The numerous anecdotes from such personalities as Hugh Downs never fail to amaze--and amuse. (Be sure to read his account of his role in the earliest TV news broadcasts).

    Not to be missed also are the long-overdue tributes to individual pioneers, such as Charles Francis Jenkins, who began the first television "network" of sorts in the late 1920's; John Logie Baird, whose "mechanical" method of transmission (using a spinning disk) was doomed to failure; and of course Philo Taylor Farnsworth, the young Mormon genius who, at age 14, conceived the idea of electronic television while plowing his parents' field. The rise and fall of Allen B. DuMont, who at one time ran a fourth network (only to fall victim to the backstabbing maneuvers of NBC head David Sarnoff) is told in painstaking detail.

    If you love television (and perhaps, even if you don't) you'll love this book.

  • This book is just incredible. The author (who also directed the Chevy Chase Fletch movie series), goes waaaaay back into an era of surprising TV struggle! Please, order it, buy it, get it used, new, hardcover, paperback or whatever. BUT GET IT. Almost every paragraph is and eyebrow raiser, every paragraph reveals some incredible detail! (For instance, Steve Allen was NOT the first talk show host in TV history!). It's perfectly written. It covers almost every area (Sports TV, Drama TV, Contest TV, etc.). It tells everything on the subject, and makes you gain hopes regarding the starting difficulties of any new project you may be trying to implement! Hold on to your idea! Hold on to your dream! These old time dreamers kept going, and made TV possible for everyone today!. It's the best book I've read this year (2001). Please. DON'T stand by and rush to get Please Stand By! You'll be really glad to know how many amazing things happened between 1928, when TV really began, and 1948, twenty years later, when they have made us BELIEVE everything started.
    Carlos Sicilia, Caracas, Venezuela.

  • Much ink has been spilled describing the early battles, both political and technological, to get television off the ground. But the story of what actually went before the camera during the thirties is almost lost. It is truly amazing just how much broadcasting was going on in these days when a well off amateurs could start their own low fidelity television stations. You'll learn many fun facts too. Such as-- Who was the first person to write, direct, and star in a television drama? Eddie Alpert!

  • Michael Ritchie was a good director (The Candidate, Fletch, Bad News Bears, et al.) but a pretty sloppy writer and historian. Nevertheless the fun and adventure of pre-mass media television shine through in a book that's full of errors (and probably wasn't even copyedited). You'll get a vivid idea of what it might have been like tuning into NBC's or General Electric's pioneering stations in the late '30s and early '40s, working with trailblazers like Dennis James and Anthony Mann, and of course, goof-up after amusing goof-up as a new technology finds its feet and defines what makes a good program in ways that we can still appreciate today.

    Ritchie makes one point that I've never seen anyone else comment on. He believed that TV's delayed 1948 "debut" as mass entertainment was due mostly to the American Federation of Musicians, who had banned all live music from TV for several years previous. It's an intriguing thesis - no variety shows, musicals, concerts, etc. certainly limited TV's programming and appeal. But I've never seen it discussed since. Of course, that may be because most of the events related in this book officially "never happened"...

  • Oddly, the least interesting things ever aired on television are suddenly irresistible! Who would've ever thought to make a book out of it??