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ePub True Blood and Philosophy: We Wanna Think Bad Things with You download

by William Irwin

ePub True Blood and Philosophy: We Wanna Think Bad Things with You download
Author:
William Irwin
ISBN13:
978-0470597729
ISBN:
0470597720
Language:
Publisher:
Wiley; 1 edition (June 1, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Television
ePub file:
1124 kb
Fb2 file:
1748 kb
Other formats:
lit doc mbr txt
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
496

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True Blood and Philosophy book. Start by marking True Blood and Philosophy: We Wanna Think Bad Things with You as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Blackwell philosophy and POP culture series

Blackwell philosophy and POP culture series. This book has not been approved, licensed, or sponsored by any entity or person involved in creating or producing the Southern Vampire Mysteries, True Blood, the novels, or TV show. Does God hate fangs? Is Sam still Sam when he turns into a collie?

Now True Blood and Philosophy calls on the minds of some of history's great thinkers to perform some philosophical . Smart and entertaining, True Blood and Philosophy provides food-or blood-for thought, and a fun, new way to look at the series.

Now True Blood and Philosophy calls on the minds of some of history's great thinkers to perform some philosophical bloodletting on such topics as Sookie and the metaphysics of mindreading; Maryann and sacrificial religion; werewolves, shapeshifters and personal identity; vampire politics, evil, desire, and much more.

by William Irwin & George A. Dunn & Rebecca Housel Subtitle: : The 4-Step Solution for Changing Bad Habits, Ending Unhealthy Thinking, and Taking. Dietary Reference Intakes. Dunn & Rebecca Housel. Materials for High Temperature Power Generation and Process Plant Applications. Subtitle: : The 4-Step Solution for Changing Bad Habits, Ending Unhealthy Thinking, and Taking. 306 Pages·2001·886 KB·21,601 Downloads·New! Intake (AI), and Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL). To date, several volumes in this series have been.

Now True Blood and Philosophy calls on the minds of some of history's great thinkers to perform some philosophical . WILLIAM IRWIN is a professor of philosophy at King's College in Pennsylvania. The first book to explore the philosophical issues and themes behind the True Blood novels and television series. Adds a new dimension to your understanding of True Blood characters and themes.

William Irwin, George A. Dunn, Rebecca Housel. The first look at the philosophical issues behind Charlaine Harris's New York Times bestsellers The Southern Vampire Mysteries and the True Blood television series Teeming with complex, mythical characters in the shape of vampires, telepaths, shapeshifters, and the like, True Blood, the popular HBO series adapted from Charlaine Harris's bestselling The Southern Vampire Mysteries, has a rich collection of themes to. Explore, from sex and romance to bigotry and violence to death and immortality.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. Распространяем знания с 2009. Пользовательское соглашение.

True Blood and Philosophy-a good book for doing bad things. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 9 years ago. "True Blood and Philosophy: We Wanna Think Bad Things with You" is a philosophical look at the cultural implications within the world of the HBO series True Blood

True Blood and Philosophy-a good book for doing bad things. "True Blood and Philosophy: We Wanna Think Bad Things with You" is a philosophical look at the cultural implications within the world of the HBO series True Blood. As it is not likely that the issues presented by the presence of vampires in our human society will actually become a problem for the world any time soon, this book shows the reader the parallels between the True Blood world and our own. Dunn, Rebecca Housel

William Irwin, George A.

The first look at the philosophical issues behind CharlaineHarris's New York Times bestsellers The Southern VampireMysteries and the True Blood television series

Teeming with complex, mythical characters in the shape ofvampires, telepaths, shapeshifters, and the like, TrueBlood, the popular HBO series adapted from Charlaine Harris'sbestselling The Southern Vampire Mysteries, has a richcollection of themes to explore, from sex and romance to bigotryand violence to death and immortality. The goings-on in themythical town of Bon Temps, Louisiana, where vampires satiate theirblood lust and openly commingle with ordinary humans, present noshortages of juicy metaphysical morsels to sink your teethinto.

Now True Blood and Philosophy calls on the minds of someof history's great thinkers to perform some philosophicalbloodletting on such topics as Sookie and the metaphysics ofmindreading; Maryann and sacrificial religion; werewolves,shapeshifters and personal identity; vampire politics, evil,desire, and much more.

The first book to explore the philosophical issues and themesbehind the True Blood novels and television seriesAdds a new dimension to your understanding of True Bloodcharacters and themesThe perfect companion to the start of the third season on HBOand the release of the second season on DVD

Smart and entertaining, True Blood and Philosophyprovides food—or blood—for thought, and a fun, new wayto look at the series.

  • This book covers a rather broad spectrum of philosophical ideas as seen through the prism of the True Blood series, and the novels that inspired it. There are 18 chapters, divided relatively arbitrarily into 6 parts. Many different authors contribute to the book.

    PROS: This is basically a book that serves as a catalyst to have fun thinking about the ethics one can gleam from analyzing the situations in the this series. I don’t know of another commercially available book that does this, and on the whole, it is much better in quality than reading the random blog that try to do the same. Although there is just a little bit of humor, “The Edible Complex,” most authors seem fairly serious about their task. One can be entertained by watching the TV show, then take the unreal situations, free from the complexity of human history, culture, and politics, to examine ethical principles that can then be applied to real human situations. One can ask if Arlene should abort her child that might be truly evil demon spawn. This helps to more clearly delineate the principles that apply in making a decision about abortion in real life. Can we know the qualia of a vampire’s experience? Another human’s? Our own? Besides some challenging scenarios to ponder, I also personally learned about philosophers such as Theodore Sider and his identity theory called “four-dimensionalism.”

    CONS: Primarily the quality of writing differs quite significantly between the various authors.
    I found three chapters to be quite compelling and argued well. The best was CHAP 5: “Honey if we can’t kill people, what’s the point of being a vampire?” by William Curtis. He was one of only a few to point out that many vampires kill humans. Even Bill, who many other authors call the “good” vampire, kills an innocent human, Jessica, and kills others in his own vigilante justice.
    Six or seven other chapters I enjoyed, and although I disagreed with some lines of reasoning and conclusions, I could see enjoying having a beer with the authors arguing over some points, or debating this with classmates in college. For example, Sarah Grubb asks, “If our human bodies don’t really remain the same throughout our lives, how can the bodily theory account for our personal identity?” She answers with the example of Jessica being sweet and innocent before turning, then becoming quite the party girl after, whereas I would argue that the precipitants for this personality conversion were already present before her conversion into a vampire, and would likely have emerged once she was free of her family’s constraints. We are talking about vampires, so who knows, but what fun to make the argument anyway!
    The rest were weak or confused even, and seemed to value political correctness over substance. A couple chapters seemed to continually mix the reality of our nonfiction world with the unreality of the fictional world. (The following supports this statement and may be skipped unless wanting to know my reasons for stating this).
    For instance Brace and Arp argue that vampires serve as a metaphor for homosexuality, such as in “coming out of the coffin,” and note when the metaphor does not work, for instance in that many vampires choose to become vampires, whereas homosexuals are born that way. However they deal with vampires killing humans, not by noting that this isn’t a very gay trait either (thus adding to the growing list of how vampires really don’t serve well as a metaphor for homosexuality), but instead labor to say that this is merely the fear that homosexuals are predators preying on the non-homosexual, but in the story, vampires are really killing. If vampires came out of the closet and deserve equal rights, like say, to marry each other, metaphor for gays in the real world, then so many of them shouldn’t be killing the humans in the pretend world.
    A more egregious argument is the race baiting provided by Jonell and Craton. The TV series showed a person upset that the store Tara works in does not having plastic sheeting, which Jonell and Craton argue is an example of “white entitlement.” So the customer would not have been upset if Tara was white? Could the customer NOT have been black? More than that is when Tara responds with the threat that her baby-daddy would kick in the teeth of the owner, and Jonell and Craton see in the resulting fear in the white customer racism since she didn’t see Tara’s use of stereotypes in that moment. First, regardless of Tara’s skin color, in this fictional world, she was lazy, and she was rude. This is followed by a threat. Yes, loaded with stereotyped language, but in the moment of facing a rude person making a threat, one might not see that, and, regardless, more important, it’s naïve to think that some people actually using stereotyped language still don’t mean what they are saying.
    Corn and Dunn argue it does not matter if people were externally controlled by the maenad Maryann, that it really shows they were victims of the crowd effect. However arguing for something being a metaphor for us in the real world means accepting the reality of it in the fictional world, in this case, Maryann’s vibrating body, and her victims’ eyes turning that eery halo black indicate her control over them, therefore their actions do not represent the expression of their repressed desires (thus our repressed desires and ease of manipulation of such in a crowd). Even if one were make the mistake of mixing the realities of the two worlds, it still does not make sense as some of these people cared for Sam, for instance, yet they were more than willing to see him sacrificed. Turning on friends this way in the real world worked by fear of Hitler for instance, or fear of being called a witch your-self in Salem, not by wanting to have an orgy.
    I also did not care for some authors mixing information from the books with information from the TV series, since there are some significant differences, so one cannot use one to support the other, but this is a minor complaint.

    CONCLUSION: If you like debating, or philosophizing, or are perhaps even struggling with getting a different perspective in how to see the principles informing some ethical concerns, and, if you enjoy “True Blood,” then by all means, get this book.

    KINDLE EDITION: No big problems with this Kindle edition as I have had with many other Kindle books. The footnote and return functions work well, relatively few typos.

  • I'm a huge fan of True Blood but also a professor about to use Dead Until Dark in First Year Seminar, so I was hopeful of using some of this text in class.

    This text will not give the real fan of the show anything new or enlightening, in fact if you are a fan of both the novels and the show you will find a few plots mistakes. But there are a couple of articles, especially Dressing Up and Playing Human or To Turn or Not to Turn, that I found fun and interesting. Both articles would work for non-fans of the show and asked some interesting questions that would translate well to a first year classroom (even if they offered no real answers - why do philosophers like to talk in circles so much?!)

    Again this is not ground-breaking stuff, it's more along the lines of fan scholars writing classroom ready pieces. There are very few sources, and I'm not convinced that, as a group, they know much about vampires beyond this particular show or the novels. I kept thinking about how much better a chapter like Joseph Foy's Signed in Blood would have been if he had more material on the history of the vampire and personal rights. But it had me nodding my head on occasion and laughing out loud (well okay smiling) once or twice.

    I'm glad I read it and I'm pleased that I used it in class. My students were able to understand a lot more from these articles than some of the more intensely scholarly material we read. But honestly if you are as much of a vampire nerd as I am who sees True Blood as part of a longer tradition, then you won't learn anything new. I say buy it, as someone who has a philosopher as a best friend I know how hard it is for these guys to translate their thoughts for a populist audience so this is pretty impressive and opens up a world of possibilities for bringing the vampire narrative into the classroom. If you want to try Zombies and Vampires try the earlier text in the seriesZombies, Vampires, and Philosophy: New Life for the Undead (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

    3 stars for content and 1 more for effort.

  • awesome philisophical take on the blueprint of the first two seasons, before it all went to s***.