mostraligabue
» » Landmark Cases in the Law of Restitution

ePub Landmark Cases in the Law of Restitution download

by Charles Mitchell,Paul Mitchell

ePub Landmark Cases in the Law of Restitution download
Author:
Charles Mitchell,Paul Mitchell
ISBN13:
978-1841135885
ISBN:
1841135887
Language:
Publisher:
Hart Publishing (March 1, 2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Business
ePub file:
1121 kb
Fb2 file:
1468 kb
Other formats:
docx lrf rtf lrf
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
559

Charles Mitchell is a Professor of Law at King's College London.

Charles Mitchell is a Professor of Law at King's College London. He writes widely on the law of trusts and the law of obligations, and his recent publications include Underhill and Hayton's Law Relating to Trusts and Trustees (17th edn, 2006) (co-authored with David Hayton and Paul Matthews) and Subrogation: Law and Practice (2007) (co-authored with Stephen Watterson). Paul Mitchell is a Reader in Law at King's College London and the author of The Making of the Modern Law of Defamation (Hart, 2005).

Start by marking Landmark Cases in the Law of Restitution as Want to Read . It is now well established that the law of unjust enrichment forms an important and distinctive part of the English law of obligations.

Start by marking Landmark Cases in the Law of Restitution as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Restitutionary awards for unjust enrichment and for wrongdoing are clearly recognized for what they are, but these are recent developments. Before the last decade of the twentieth century, the very existence of a separate law of unjust enr It is now well established that the law of unjust enrichment forms an important and distinctive part of the English law of obligations.

It is now well established that the law of unjust enrichment forms an important and distinctive part of the English law of obligations. Restitutionary awards for unjust enrichment and for wrongdoing are clearly recognised for what they are. But these are recent developments Added to basket.

The cases discussed are, The Earl of Oxford's Case (1615) David Ibbetson

The cases discussed are, The Earl of Oxford's Case (1615) David Ibbetson. Coke v Fountaine (1676) Mike Macnair. Grey v Grey (1677) Jamie Glister. Penn v Lord Baltimore (1750) Paul Mitchell. Burgess v Wheate (1759) Paul Matthews. Morice v Bishop of Durham (1805) Joshua Getzler. Tulk v Moxhay (1848) Ben McFarlane. Prince Albert v Strange (1849) Lionel Bently.

The cases discussed are, Lampleigh v Brathwait (1615). Moses v Macferlan (1760). Taylor v Plumer (1815). Planche v Colburn (1831). Marsh v Keating (1834). Erlanger v New Sombrero Phosphate Co (1878). Phillips v Homfray (1883). Allcard v Skinner (1887). Sinclair v Brougham (1914).

Professor Prue Vines Torts Law Journal Volume 19, 2011 Like the book's predecessors (on restitution and contract), Landmark Cases in the Law . Charles Mitchell is a Fellow and Tutor in Law at Jesus College, Oxford, and a Professor of Law at the University of Oxford.

Charles Mitchell is a Fellow and Tutor in Law at Jesus College, Oxford, and a Professor of Law at the University of Oxford.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The education debate.

It is now well established that the law of unjust enrichment forms an important and distinctive part of the English law of obligations. Restitutionary awards for unjust enrichment and for wrongdoing are clearly recognized for what they are, but these are recent developments. Before the last decade of the twentieth century, the very existence of a separate law of unjust enrichment was controversial, with its scope and content matters of dispute. In this collection of essays, a group of leading scholars look back and reappraise some of the landmark cases in the law of restitution. They range from the early seventeenth century to the mid-twentieth century, and shed new light on some classic decisions. Some argue that the importance of their case has been overstated, and others feel that these have been overlooked, or misconceived. All persuasively invite the reader to think again about some well-known authorities. The book is an essential resource for anyone-scholar, student, or practitioner-with an interest in this fascinating area of the law.