mostraligabue
» » The End of Obscenity: The Trials of Lady Chatterley, Tropic of Cancer and Fanny Hill

ePub The End of Obscenity: The Trials of Lady Chatterley, Tropic of Cancer and Fanny Hill download

by Charles Rembar

ePub The End of Obscenity: The Trials of Lady Chatterley, Tropic of Cancer and Fanny Hill download
Author:
Charles Rembar
ISBN13:
978-0060970611
ISBN:
0060970618
Language:
Publisher:
Olympic Marketing Corp; 1st Perennial library ed edition (October 1, 1986)
Category:
Subcategory:
Rules & Procedures
ePub file:
1541 kb
Fb2 file:
1516 kb
Other formats:
mbr lrf rtf docx
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
492

People living in Europe had seen much worse in the meantime, and Harlequin has some volumes nowadays much more explicit and hot than these books. Rembar's is still the best book on that kind of censorship. These books were considered "classics" and therefore in my parents' library.

Lawrence, D. H. (David Herbert), 1885-1930. Lady Chatterley's lover; Miller, Henry, 1891-1980. Tropic of Cancer; Cleland, John, 1709-1789. Memoirs of a woman of pleasure.

The End of Obscenity book. 1986 stated 1st print. This book details the ultimately successful fight against the censorship of three books: Lady Chatterley's Lover, Tropic of Cancer, and Fanny Hill. The last book resulted in a 1966 Supreme Court case which held that a book was entitled to first amendment protection and could not be banned unless it was utterly without social value. Rembar, who was the lawyer in the three cases, In this day and age, it is hard to believe that there was a time when books were routinely banned for "obscenity.

As the lead attorney on the case, he-with the support of a few brave publishers-changed the way Americans read and honor books, especially the controversial ones. Up until the 1960s, depending on your state of residence, your copy of Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer might be seized by the US Postal Service before reaching your mailbox. Selling copies of Cleland’s Fanny Hill in your bookstore was considered illegal.

Up until the 1960s, depending on your state of residence, your copy of Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer might be seized by the US Postal Service before reaching your mailbox.

Published by Andre Deutsch (1969), (London), 1969. All books labeled "first .

Charles Rembar (March 12, 1915 – October 24, 2000) was an American lawyer who was born in Oceanport, New Jersey and grew up in Long Branch, New Jersey. In 1975, he published a collection of wide-ranging essays titled Perspective. In 1980 he wrote The Law of the Land: The.

Published 1970 by Simon and Schuster in New York. Memoirs of a woman of pleasure (Cleland, John). D. Lawrence (1885-1930), Henry Miller (1891-1980), John Cleland (1709-1789).

The lawyer Charles Rembar, who has died aged 85, won some of the most important censorship cases in America, defending the publishers of Lady Chatterley's Lover, Tropic Of Cancer and Fanny Hill. In each case, he argued that the artistic merit of the books outweighed any possible obscenity and should be protected by the first amendment of the US constitution.

In 1975, he published a collection of wide-ranging essays titled Perspective

1986 stated 1st print
  • Twenty-five years ago, it was a crime to sell Theodore Dreiser's An American Tragedy in Massachusetts, or Edmund Wilson's Memoirs of Hecate County in New York, or Lady Chatterley's Lover anywhere. Henry Miller's works could come into his native land only in the hands of smugglers.
    The End of Obscenity describes the exciting trials of Lady Chatterly, Tropic of Cancer, and Fanny Hill, leading all the way to the Supreme Court, which cleared the way for their publication in this country. Charles Rembar's analysis of the legal background and strategy of each case is insightful and lucid. And the excerpts from the trial transcripts are often gripping, especially the excerpts from the expert witnesses who were called by the defense: Malcolm Cowley (who, in speaking of Lady Chatterley's Lover, said to a not particularly literary-minded examiner, "Sir, I will have to explain that the whole book is directed toward what doesn't happen in the book") and his fellow critics Eric Bentley, Alfred Kazin, and many others, joined by such political figures as Senator Edward Brooke, judges, postmasters and the writers themselves.
    Rembar's book deals not with the why of obscenity laws but with the how, and as a result often has a freshness that little recent writing on this subject can match.

  • All the trials about obscene publications recounted by Rembar are about old fashioned old books: the trials took place in the 60s, but the books are much older: Lady Chatterley 1928, Tropic of Cancer 1934, and Fanny Hill...1748. People living in Europe had seen much worse in the meantime, and Harlequin has some volumes nowadays much more explicit and hot than these books. Rembar's is still the best book on that kind of censorship.
    These books were considered "classics" and therefore in my parents' library. I had much more trouble with Racine, which we had to study at school when I was 15, than with Lady Chatterley which was slightly boring to me. Racine is a French 17th century author who wrote a play about incest. Phèdre is in love with her son-in-law, but of course the reader is supposed to know that, nothing is said. As a result, I never understood the play: I could see the poor woman getting all hysterical every time her son-in-law appeared, but I had no clue: I did not have the concept...So whoever was on the board of education at the time probably did not know any better than me.
    I think pornography is in the eye in the beholder: if something seems dirty to you, do not read it: it is not good for you; if it seems beautiful, it is probably good literature too. Do not let the government tell you what to read.